or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › RIM's BlackBerry Enterprise Server to support Apple's iOS devices
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

RIM's BlackBerry Enterprise Server to support Apple's iOS devices

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
Research in Motion announced on Monday that it will update its BlackBerry Enterprise Server software to support Apple hardware running the iOS operating system, including the iPhone and iPad, as well as devices that run Google Android.

The multi-platform "BlackBerry Enterprise Solution" will support management and securing of both smartphones and tablets, and is designed for enterprises and government organizations. The features will be added to BlackBerry Enterprise Server through RIM's pending acquisition of ubitexx.

RIM said that the new solution is "expected" to allow secure device management for iOS-based devices, as well as hardware running the Google Android mobile operating system. RIM aims to allow management of those devices from a single Web-based console.

"The multi-platform BlackBerry Enterprise Solution is designed to address a growing market and respond to requests from enterprise customers who want a secure multi-platform device management solution from a company that already delivers the gold standard for enterprise mobility," said Peter Devenyi, Communications Platform Group VP at RIM. "We recognize the opportunity to continue leading in the enterprise market by providing customers with a common platform to help simplify the management of a variety of mobile devices."

RIM said the single web-based console is being designed to provide IT administrators with the ability to distribute software and manage policies, inventory, security and services for BlackBerry devices, as well as other mobile devices. IT administrators will be able to manage devices over-the-air, including activating devices, distributing software and applications, locking or wiping devices, enforcing and resetting device passwords, setting IT policies, and managing optional mobile applications for end users.

Certain features, including push technology and firewall access, are expected to remain exclusive to BlackBerry devices because such capabilities are built into the design of a devices operating system. The product is expected to be released later this year.

RIM's multi-platform push for BlackBerry Enterprise Server was one of a number of announcements from the company on Monday. Also revealed was the new "BlackBerry Balance" technology that allows use of a smartphone for both work and personal purposes, ensuring privacy of personal content and security of work data.

The company also unveiled a new video chat application and announced a Facebook application for its newly launched BlackBerry PlayBook tablet. The playbook launched in April to lukewarm reviews.

The company also announced the two new phones that run the BlackBerry OS 7 software: The BlackBerry Bold 9900 and 9930. Both feature a 1.2GHz processor and a "Liquid Graphics" touchscreen.



The BlackBerry Bold 9900 supports HSPA+ connectivity, while the 9930 supports CDMA EV-DO Rev. A and HSPA+ global roaming on GSM/UMTS networks. Both also feature built-in support for near-field communications, as well as a built-in compass and 720p high-definition video recording capabilities. They will be available this summer.

RIM surprised last week with a pre-announcement of its sales for the May quarter. The company opted to disclose its sales early because it expects it to be below guidance. The company also warned investors of impending delays for new BlackBerry product launches.

Wall Street reacted negatively to RIM's announcement, and one analyst said that the company's struggles and product delays are an opportunity for Apple to gain a greater lead over its competitor. Last quarter, Apple sold 18.65 million iPhones, a number 38 percent better than the 13.5 million handsets RIM expects to ship in its May quarter.
post #2 of 31
Mind blown. More or less sounds like a competitor for Activesync. Or maybe using Good Technology's model.
post #3 of 31
And the downward spiral continues.
post #4 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawson100 View Post

Mind blown. More or less sounds like a competitor for Activesync. Or maybe using Good Technology's model.

It will be interesting to see how the other operating systems take this. I know a few people with BES locked blackberry's. The companies can get kinda crazy with the protection, going so far as to have their Blackberry's locked out of application downloads entirely.

It's a sign of BBerry continuing to lose ground, but it's a win for customers who've wanted a modern smartphone, but their companies didn't allow it.
post #5 of 31
Smart move if you ask me. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Really this only helps RIM continue to do what they do best. Their phones were never revolutionary, they were just extremely reliable and now RIM is showing that it can bring that reliability to any mobile device/system.
post #6 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Research in Motion announced on Monday that it will update its BlackBerry Enterprise Server software to support Apple hardware running the iOS operating system, including the iPhone and iPad, as well as devices that run Google Android. ...

I don't get RIM. They keep going on like they are going to take on Apple and conquer the smartphone/tablet market, yet at the same time they are clearly preparing for a world where Blackberry no longer makes hardware. They've already looked into making Android and iOS BBM clients, and now the server will be compatible as well?

Why don't they just announce they are leaving the hardware market entirely and just get it over with?
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Smart move if you ask me. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Really this only helps RIM continue to do what they do best. Their phones were never revolutionary, they were just extremely reliable and now RIM is showing that it can bring that reliability to any mobile device/system.

Rim's phones were some of the first really popular messaging devices, and the first to really bring push services (specifically email and messaging) to the general public.

They've had a lot of issues the past couple of years, but that doesn't mean their products were never revolutionary.
post #8 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't get RIM. They keep going on like they are going to take on Apple and conquer the smartphone/tablet market, yet at the same time they are clearly preparing for a world where Blackberry no longer makes hardware. They've already looked into making Android and iOS BBM clients, and now the server will be compatible as well?

Why don't they just announce they are leaving the hardware market entirely and just get it over with?

I imagine they have lots of inventory and production is still running, so they can't just slam on the brakes. It does seem like the handwriting is on the wall in six foot tall letters, however.
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't get RIM. They keep going on like they are going to take on Apple and conquer the smartphone/tablet market, yet at the same time they are clearly preparing for a world where Blackberry no longer makes hardware. They've already looked into making Android and iOS BBM clients, and now the server will be compatible as well?

Why don't they just announce they are leaving the hardware market entirely and just get it over with?

Because there is still money to be made?
post #10 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

I imagine they have lots of inventory and production is still running, so they can't just slam on the brakes. It does seem like the handwriting is on the wall in six foot tall letters, however.

I thinks it is a smart move as it prolongs the life of their enterprise service. As long as they retain that they can still exist in the hardware market. Perhaps it gives them time to come up with some inovative products Without it they would probably disappear pretty quickly.
post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't get RIM. They keep going on like they are going to take on Apple and conquer the smartphone/tablet market, yet at the same time they are clearly preparing for a world where Blackberry no longer makes hardware. They've already looked into making Android and iOS BBM clients, and now the server will be compatible as well?

Why don't they just announce they are leaving the hardware market entirely and just get it over with?

I think you are over simplifying the situation. It is not about BB leaving the hardware market, it about strengthening their position with companies already running BB enterprise and making a very good solution even better. If Apple/Google were going to produce an enterprise solution, their have just found it much harder, unless both companies can develop a product, which is far superior to BB enterprise.
Very clever move on BB's part, if you can not outright win, at least take advantages of your opponents strengths and use it to your own advantage.

I like the apple solution as smartphone, but must praise BB for their enterprise solution and very happy, I can get both worlds supporting me in further.
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

I think you are over simplifying the situation. It is not about BB leaving the hardware market, it about strengthening their position with companies already running BB enterprise and making a very good solution even better. ....

Yeah, but their only differentiator as a company is the plastic keyboard and BBM messenger. The plastic keyboard enthusiasts are already fading fast.

Making BBM available on all platforms is actually the smart move for them and kind of the only way out if their hardware continues to not sell well. But it kills their main differentiator (BBM), so it kind of telegraphs the "end of the hardware business" or at least the beginning of the end of the hardware business.

What I'm saying is that if BBM is available on different hardware, then there is no reason for anyone to buy their hardware (because of it's relative suckage).
post #13 of 31
This isn't the first time that RIM have supported a rival platform. I remember a friend having Blackberry e-mail on his Nokia smartphone about 4 years ago. I have no idea why RIM retreated from rival platforms after that and why they've decided to revisit the strategy now.

Makes a lot of sense though. RIM's core business is the e-mail service, not the smartphones it runs on.
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Smart move if you ask me. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Really this only helps RIM continue to do what they do best. Their phones were never revolutionary, they were just extremely reliable and now RIM is showing that it can bring that reliability to any mobile device/system.

I think its smart and desperate. They dont have a competing handset going forward and it is their backend where they make the most money. If they convince corporations that BES is the best option for secure and reliable communications they do have the potential to increase their profits as they lose ground in the handset market.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't get RIM. They keep going on like they are going to take on Apple and conquer the smartphone/tablet market, yet at the same time they are clearly preparing for a world where Blackberry no longer makes hardware. They've already looked into making Android and iOS BBM clients, and now the server will be compatible as well?

Why don't they just announce they are leaving the hardware market entirely and just get it over with?

they spent the last decade building data centers around the world to run the backend for BIS and BES. cost ridiculous amounts of money. no one is brave enough to suggest they shutter all the data centers since they aren't needed and just make a phone like apple/htc/motorola and others
post #16 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

I imagine they have lots of inventory and production is still running, so they can't just slam on the brakes. It does seem like the handwriting is on the wall in six foot tall letters, however.

My guess is that RIM uses modern supply chain management practices such as JIT or ERP and can slam the brakes on at any time.

The people who run this company are seasoned business professionals. It's not a lemonade stand.
post #17 of 31
Wasn't RIM's CEO telling us all to stayed tuned for new hardware today? Looks like RIMM is going to make same transition SEGA made.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

That is exactly what I was going to say.
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Smart move if you ask me. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Really this only helps RIM continue to do what they do best. Their phones were never revolutionary, they were just extremely reliable and now RIM is showing that it can bring that reliability to any mobile device/system.

Apple is bringing their own Ecosystem for their iOS Devices. Who in their right mind wants to rely on a 3rd party competitor when the support from Apple covers them bumper to bumper?

Sorry, but if you're investing in the iOS platform for the Enterprise you are also investing into OS X.
post #20 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Apple is bringing their own Ecosystem for their iOS Devices. Who in their right mind wants to rely on a 3rd party competitor when the support from Apple covers them bumper to bumper?

Sorry, but if you're investing in the iOS platform for the Enterprise you are also investing into OS X.

How so? I can see some notebooks running Mac OS or some other various Macs for in-house iOS developers, but I cant see the reasoning behind Macs being used widely in the enterprise simply because they use iOS-based iDevices.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #21 of 31
Do they have an ETA on this? I currently have to forward emails from my work BB to my iPhone. This would save a bit of hassle and allow me just to add it to the BES.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Menno View Post

Rim's phones were some of the first really popular messaging devices, and the first to really bring push services (specifically email and messaging) to the general public.
They've had a lot of issues the past couple of years, but that doesn't mean their products were never revolutionary.

That's history.
Looks like they want to stay in the secure Email server market. At least that is something the others don't excel at.
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienzed View Post

Smart move if you ask me. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Really this only helps RIM continue to do what they do best. Their phones were never revolutionary, they were just extremely reliable and now RIM is showing that it can bring that reliability to any mobile device/system.

Well, they have no choice. You know, resistance is futile and all that.

But it must gall those guys to be forced to make such accommodations for a competitor who they know full well will Eat Their Lunch.
post #24 of 31
1) I think it's smart for BB to do this. It will strengthen their ties with existing customers who were already looking at ways to migrate. Now the customers can simply upgraded BES and offer multiple devices, not just BB, rather than leave BB cold-turkey.

2) My company would probably allow me to use my personal iPhone, but there ain't no way in hell I'm letting them dictate security policies on my phone. I'm also not going to carry 2 phones again. With that said, if my company wants me to access company email on the go, they'll have to develop an app that contains the company email with the security they want or allow it to be on a device of my own making.
post #25 of 31
Wait... RIM wants to allow someone else to remote wipe my entire personal device just because they have a sandboxes corp email app on my phone -- that I pay for?

I don't think so.

Glad my corp elected to use Good Tech
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't get RIM. They keep going on like they are going to take on Apple and conquer the smartphone/tablet market, yet at the same time they are clearly preparing for a world where Blackberry no longer makes hardware. They've already looked into making Android and iOS BBM clients, and now the server will be compatible as well?

Why don't they just announce they are leaving the hardware market entirely and just get it over with?

I totally agree with you. BES is a big competitive advantage for BlackBerry devices. Enterprise customers like BlackBerry because of BES. If BES works for other devices, then people don't have much of a reason to buy BlackBerry phones.

Also, what's so great about the new Bold? It's the same as the old Bold except that the screen is a touchscreen and it has a keyboard, except that you have half the screen real estate that you'd normally have on full-size touchscreen phone (e.g. Droid).
post #27 of 31
What they need to do is go with the flow and start using another OS. They should make android phones or WP7 and install blackberry essential apps on them and they would make a killing. They don't need to crash burn and become a soft where only company. They never had bad hardware. They just don't notice people don't want Blackberries they want Androids and iPhones.
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

it kind of telegraphs the "end of the hardware business"

Agreed. They just signed the death warrant for BlackBerry hardware.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Yeah, but their only differentiator as a company is the plastic keyboard and BBM messenger. The plastic keyboard enthusiasts are already fading fast.

Making BBM available on all platforms is actually the smart move for them and kind of the only way out if their hardware continues to not sell well. But it kills their main differentiator (BBM), so it kind of telegraphs the "end of the hardware business" or at least the beginning of the end of the hardware business.

What I'm saying is that if BBM is available on different hardware, then there is no reason for anyone to buy their hardware (because of it's relative suckage).

Totally true. But what's happening here is that companies no longer want to pay for and maintain a service- BES, that only works with BB devices. Most all business already use exchange servers, why not just use it with activesync for mobile? Recently some firms are giving into requests for offering other devices, ie iPhone. And since so many switch to or want an iPhone, firms don't see the need to continue to play for BES for only a portion of its employees with BB's. So, firms are killing their BES which means everybody has to switch to iPhone or Android and nobody can keep BB even if they want to. I believe Clorox did this and I know of another large firm that is killing BES this summer when contract expires.

The result of this is harsh. RIM loses the BES service revenue as well as all potential device sales including replacements. RIM is basically locked out now.

By offering BES for non-BB devices, corporations can still keep BES servers and just use them for all devices. Sure, RIM will lose hardware sales, but it will still retain some hardware sales in addition to the BES service revenue. This is much better than no hardware and no service revenue.
post #30 of 31
most companies will kill BES if they could just so they don't have to pay the licensing. i can see it now, CIO's are just waiting to pay $75 or so per user for BES to manage iphones and android devices. just so some power crazed IT people can fee fuzzy that they control everything.
post #31 of 31
Will companies have to pay licensing for every iOS device being administered via the BB Ent Solution?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › RIM's BlackBerry Enterprise Server to support Apple's iOS devices