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Fortune's 'Inside Apple' describes a furious Steve Jobs after MobileMe launch - Page 2

post #41 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Wasn't my definition. I didn't write that wiki article.

It was your interpretation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

If the stuff they offer in this iCloud product catches on, great. If not, they'll invent new things for "The Cloud" until something catches on or people just get tired of hearing about "The Cloud".

The success of iCloud is irrelivent as Cloud services have already "caught on".

I agree the marketing guys will eventually come up with another name if calling it the "Cloud" becomes passé.
post #42 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post

5) Shall we yet again discuss Steve Jobs telling iPhone 4 users to simply "Not hold the phone that way!", when they had reception issues??

Sorry. This one doesn't count because he was right on the money AND the whole antenna gate was bogus.

How do we know? Every survey on iPhone 4 satisfaction results in over 80% being 'very satisfied' and another 12% being 'satisfied'. This satisfaction metric out distances any other phone by a mile.
post #43 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Yes, but the time for Jobs to ask "What does this product do?" is before it's launched, not after.

Your point is well taken, but it's a conversation trap. The follow up question was always intended to be: "then why doesn't it do that?" Granted, if Apple's management was on top of it, they would never have launched MobileMe in the condition it was in.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #44 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprockkets View Post

Hate each other? That's pretty funny, in that it is pretty messed up.

Well, after hearing our number 2 in our company tear us a new one, this is really business as usual, I guess?

This is what it takes to become the best performing company on Earth. No slags allowed.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #45 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

...that's just not the way I'm seeing the term actually being used.

Yeah, that’s what I said in the post which you disagreed.
People use “cloud” tech constantly, they just don’t think of it as such because...
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post #46 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Hmm... That seems like a fairly broad definition of "Cloud". A more common definition might be:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_computing

Which would include your examples of email and Google services, of which only email is really popular. It wouldn't include Netflix, twitter, or IMs. "Cloud computing" also tends to imply (in usage if not in actual capabilities) a "thin client", the modern day equivalent of a dumb terminal. Usually, the "thin client" is the browser.

Outside of e-mail, I'm not really seeing a "killer app" for "The Cloud". Maybe disk backup. If it's free (at least for consumers).

For Apple the killer app would be iLife plus Numbers, Pages, and Keynote to be cloud services as well as on computer apps. The real killer app for Cloud Computing is reducing the need for IT support. DropBox is great, Apple should buy them. Apple's Sync-Sucks, services such as DropBox are much more straight forward for me. Cloud, to me, is these very simple yet robust technologies, put together to form apps. PHP, javascript, HTML, CSS, KML, and SQL, blend these into any app your heart desires.
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post #47 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Well, how about I put it this way: There's little point in arguing the technical definition of the term because, at this point, it's a marketing term. "The Cloud" means whatever some company's PR department wants it to mean.

The way I've usually seen the term used is how that wiki article described it. With that definition, I'm not seeing a killer app coming from "The Cloud". I'm seeing people like Oracle using the term to try and sell consulting time to Fortune 500 companies.

It's not like Wikipedia is the definitive source but in any case your interpretation of the article is incorrect.

The definition in the article is as broad as in real life, simply stating "Cloud computing" is the use of a remote server to store information.

They give some examples of data (music, pictures, videos, bookmarks) and of cloud services (Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo) but it doesn't state that "Cloud computing" is exclusively limited to these services.

Granted, calling something a "Cloud" service has become a marketing term but not one that a company's PR department can make up the meaning to. For an application to be "Cloud" enabled it still needs to use a server on the Internet to process and/or store user information.

I'm yet to see a company with an offline application/service claim to be integrated with the cloud.

Maybe you know of one?
post #48 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendon View Post

For Apple the killer app would be iLife plus Numbers, Pages, and Keynote to be cloud services as well as on computer apps.

IMO Microsoft has shown the best balance with office integration that Apple would do well to emulate.

Files are stored locally and in the cloud. If you have Office installed on the PC you're using you get the full featured experience. If not, you can edit the documents online using Office Web Apps.

Although this is useful, to be honest it isn't really revolutionary. People have been doing the same thing with email for years.

I expect a lot more applications to evolve this way. Along with the ones you mentioned (iLife, Numbers, Pages, and Keynote) I think you should also add iTunes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendon View Post

The real killer app for Cloud Computing is reducing the need for IT support.

For consumers I think Apple have shown you can do this with a curated App Store. You don't have to run everything through a browser.

I think Apple will continue to expand on this with future iOS and OSX versions. Eventually you should be able to log into a computer and have access to everything you own. For example personal pictures, videos, documents and settings along with purchased music, movies, TV and apps.

If you don't have permission to (or don't want to) sync to a computer there should be simplified "web app" versions of the applications you own.
post #49 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Yes, but the time for Jobs to ask "What does this product do?" is before it's launched, not after.

Don't you get it?!?!?

It was a leading question. Jobs already knew what it was SUPPOSED to do, and he was waiting for the idiot that would answer the question to give his response.

Thompson
post #50 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Agree with Dropbox. It's great (which reminds me, I have some backups to do ).

Numbers, iLife, Pages, and Keynote I'm not so sure. Partly because Google's cloud apps haven't been huge successes, partly because I don't want to have to connect to the internet to use those kinds of apps, and partly because I don't want to upload my personal data to Google, Apple, or any other company unless I need to, and partly because it's hard to duplicate full desktop app functionality with javascript/html.

Maybe in a corporate setting the centrally managed apps in a cloud would be a better fit. Even there, I'm not so sure.

Interest by Corps and large organizations are what is driving the Cloud.
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post #51 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

I expect a lot more applications to evolve this way. Along with the ones you mentioned (iLife, Numbers, Pages, and Keynote) I think you should also add iTunes.

I think well have to see something pretty close to how iTunes currently works for their iCloud service to be a winner. That includes but is not limited to Playlist access, creation and editing right from the browser.

As Im sure you know they moved iTunes Store within iTunes to WebKit a couple years ago and now have pre-iTunes Store/App Store web browser pages that mimic the look and feel pretty much exactly. You can even sample music tracks within the modern browsers. I bring this up because Ive always seen this as a stepping stone to the eventual inclusion to a web-based iTunes app.

Quote:
For consumers I think Apple have shown you can do this with a curated App Store. You don't have to run everything through a browser.

I think Apple will continue to expand on this with future iOS and OSX versions. Eventually you should be able to log into a computer and have access to everything you own. For example personal pictures, videos, documents and settings along with purchased music, movies, TV and apps.

If you don't have permission to (or don't want to) sync to a computer there should be simplified "web app" versions of the applications you own.

This is an interesting thought and perhaps not too difficult with Apples support for modern webcode, though looking at iWeb you wouldnt think Apple cared much at all. \
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post #52 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by warheart777 View Post

Hey, remember clicking that little agree button. You agreed that any loss of information due to YOU not being RESPONSIBLE to back up what's important to YOU, won't be apple's responsibility. Take some god damn responsibility lolol...jeeezzz adults act as ignorant as kids.

One of the things I like about AppleInsider is the lack of snotty criticism. Well, I guess until now. Seriously, do you read every license agreement that you have to click "agree" to? It's Apple. They are trusted. He should've backed up....and probably did. If not, I'm sure there's a recovery program that will get his photos back. You don't have to be a dick about it.

It's funny how people hide behind the internet to spew their venom.
post #53 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

IMO Microsoft has shown the best balance with office integration that Apple would do well to emulate.

Files are stored locally and in the cloud. If you have Office installed on the PC you're using you get the full featured experience. If not, you can edit the documents online using Office Web Apps.

Although this is useful, to be honest it isn't really revolutionary. People have been doing the same thing with email for years.

I expect a lot more applications to evolve this way. Along with the ones you mentioned (iLife, Numbers, Pages, and Keynote) I think you should also add iTunes.



For consumers I think Apple have shown you can do this with a curated App Store. You don't have to run everything through a browser.

I think Apple will continue to expand on this with future iOS and OSX versions. Eventually you should be able to log into a computer and have access to everything you own. For example personal pictures, videos, documents and settings along with purchased music, movies, TV and apps.

If you don't have permission to (or don't want to) sync to a computer there should be simplified "web app" versions of the applications you own.

Yep you're correct, I missed iTunes. I think your last sentence is what is making hearts beat strong for the Cloud, given that 90% of the abilities of applications like Word are unused making a streamlined, made for web and desktop application possible and practical. The Google apps that you had mentioned in a prior post I think are there to test the waters, there are different ways to measure success, especially when talking about a paradigm shift when it comes to large organizations and IT support.
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post #54 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Never said it was. I said things like Netflix aren't examples of cloud computing, as the term is commonly used. Netflix is an example of cloud computing if you use the term to mean "network computing" or "Internet computing".

But, again, I'm not seeing a lot of point in arguing the technical definition of a marketing term. Netflix is what it is, regardless of whether or not you and I agree on the meaning of "The Cloud".

And yet you are the one that started arguing the point that cloud computing shouldn’t mean what it means because the common definition is no longer as prominent as the marketing term, yet that is what I initially stated despite your arguing with that point and the cropping of a through definition that backed up what we’ve been stating in this thread.
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post #55 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprockkets View Post

Hate each other? That's pretty funny, in that it is pretty messed up. ...

I don't know why this is "messed up." It sounds like appropriate chastisement to me.

What are they supposed to do after screwing up thousands of people's data? Have a group hug?

If it was me I would use the word "ashamed" more than "hate" because it's more accurate, but the general feeling is the same.
post #56 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

1a) Surely you understand that there is a time frame between the knowing of an issue and its resolution. I have no idea if that time frame was excessive but your comment doesnt support any evidence that it was, but simply states what was obvious fact for a given time frame.

1b) Since this logic board issue also affected some iBook G4 models The faulty logic boards also affected some iBook G4 models it seems to me the design/production issue could have eluded Apple for awhile.

1c) Considering that the iBook G3 goes back 8-10 years the harming of Apples rep would be minor compared to todays Apple with dominate mindshare. Note in 2003 Apple wasnt eve selling a million Macs a quarter.

1d) Ive never even heard of Screen Savers and have been using Macs long before the iBook was an Apple brand.

2a) iPods did sell in excessively higher numbers than iBooks and therefore more of an issue and concern for consumers but arent we still talking about the 1st and 2nd generation iPods from 2004 and earlier. I wonder how many of those affected consumers said Ill never buy another Apple product again and actually havent with so many advances in technology.

2b) The number of products with bad Lithium batteries is astounding. Batteries may not have moving parts but they are active, and can and do fail.

3) I dont recollect any iPod Nano battery recall or replacement settlement. Lawsuits against corps. with deep pockets are filed all the time and usually long before any company knows of an issue or can assess an issue. Note the latest issue with the tracking and the lawsuits filed immediately.

4) See #3.

5a) He never said that to users and they held an event to address the perceived issue. Apple and Jobs did show how you can attenuate the single of other phones with your hands.

5b) The antenna-gate issue probably affected Apples reputation more than all the other niggling points you make but to what extent? They gave away free Bumpers for a couple months but didnt issue a recall and didnt remove the external antenna and has increased their sales each quarter since that announcement. They are the worlds most profitable handset vendor *and by a large margin, at that *so any boost to Android-based vendors, RiM, et al. would pale in comparison.


PS: Its odd that you personally blame Jobs for technical issues that he wasnt directly responsible for except when it comes to MobileMe. Jobs is Apples CEO (still is!) so if the company falters, even if the issue is from a 3rd-party its still on Jobs as the head of the company.

PPS: You left out the iPad 2 light leak issue which isnt as large as "antenna-gate but still more widespread and known than any of the other issues you mention.

PPPS: Did you know that all CE is prone to potential issues because its mass produced consumer electronics that literally has dozens of companies involved in its creation? You can only feasibly sample only so many units. One of the things that people seems to like about Apple is their no hassle returns and replacements. They dont even have a restocking fee anymore. Id say that Apples rep is far exceeding their competition.


I hate to say this to people but don't be a prick. Steve is the CEO and therefore does get the blame. Sorry I don't know that name of every software/hardware developer manufacturer - but he put the damn shit together. Additionally, it was due to his policies that stuff like number 1 and 4 developed - hide it, wait, oh shit, we need to react to media attention. I love Apple products but I had the stuff they do. I can recognize the good shit that they do so I think it is only fair that you are able to recognize and accept the shit shit that they do.
post #57 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by pk22901 View Post

Sorry. This one doesn't count because he was right on the money AND the whole antenna gate was bogus.

How do we know? Every survey on iPhone 4 satisfaction results in over 80% being 'very satisfied' and another 12% being 'satisfied'. This satisfaction metric out distances any other phone by a mile.

I don't know how stupid you are but the reason people use the phone and like it so much is because they are willing to LIVE with the antenna gate thing. It does count for two reasons, it is a legitimate issue that many other phones do not have and Apple didn't do anything about it. The OS is awesome, the syncing is awesome, the things the phone can do is awesome. So everyone gets a bumper or a bluetooth headset. That does not resolve the issue but merely patches it. Being satisfied does not mean an issue doesn't exist.
post #58 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't know why this is "messed up." It sounds like appropriate chastisement to me.

What are they supposed to do after screwing up thousands of people's data? Have a group hug?

If it was me I would use the word "ashamed" more than "hate" because it's more accurate, but the general feeling is the same.

Completely agree
post #59 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

I wouldn't be surprised to see some sort of merger between MobileMe and Ping to make it easier to share content. Currently you can post photos, but you can't really do anything with them after they are posted (tagging, mapping, etc). And there is no good way to get people to your photo page.

Definitely. Photos and music are easy starting points of a social service. Add commenting options, published calendars, current location (via iPhone), bookmark menus on Safari, game centre - it gets big reasonably easily.
post #60 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

Don't you get it?!?!?

It was a leading question. Jobs already knew what it was SUPPOSED to do, and he was waiting for the idiot that would answer the question to give his response.

Thompson

I find it extremely hard to believe that the MobileMe Team can launch the product without SJ's testing and approval. But if SJ already did that, then it's also his responsibility for allowing the product to be approved.

Maybe I'm a traditionalist but I believe that when there's any mistake made in a company, the CEO always bear at least part of the blame, and should have no right to point fingers.
post #61 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by drobforever View Post

I find it extremely hard to believe that the MobileMe Team can launch the product without SJ's testing and approval. But if SJ already did that, then it's also his responsibility for allowing the product to be approved.

Maybe I'm a traditionalist but I believe that when there's any mistake made in a company, the CEO always bear at least part of the blame, and should have no right to point fingers.

They bear part of the blame but they have the right to point fingers unless they are the only one who worked on the project - the people work for the guy so they did not do it right. It wasn't like he was making the servers deny requests.
post #62 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Never said it was. I said things like Netflix aren't examples of cloud computing, as the term is commonly used. Netflix is an example of cloud computing if you use the term to mean "network computing" or "Internet computing".

But, again, I'm not seeing a lot of point in arguing the technical definition of a marketing term. Netflix is what it is, regardless of whether or not you and I agree on the meaning of "The Cloud".

You back flip more than an Olympic gymnast!
post #63 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post

Steve Jobs has probably done more to tarnish Apple's reputation than any number of MobileMe programmers did.

Yeah, Apple's reputation is in shambles.
post #64 of 102
This article is supposed to paint a picture of Apple's impressively unique management architecture. But the MobileMe example unintentionally shows that their system failed miserably. First of all, how could Steve Jobs the almighty leader not be aware that MobileMe was simply not working well? How could the entire management team allow it to be launched? How is it that, two years after this impassioned outburst by Jobs, MobileMe remains essentially a dud? Clearly, neither Jobs nor his gestalt management team uses it, or they would be more aware of its failings.

Jobs likes to say that Apple makes great hardware in order to write great software. Well, MobileMe and Ping are two examples of miserable software failures. In comparison, their hardware products have a superior batting average.

And, before the shots are fired, this is not an Android troll writing, but rather a passionate Apple fan. The point here is that Apple does not seem to have the requisite DNA in writing service based software. This is not an easy thing to change. And it makes you wonder about their upcoming music locker service.
post #65 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

I'd love to see more effort put into RSS... but it seems like everyone is moving to Twitter.

It's a shame IMO that we have to trade off the better news format in RSS for the added social element in Twitter.

I'd love to see an RSS replacement that sits on top of Twitter. That would be sweet.

As far as managing RSS feeds go Google Reader is by far and away still the best service... although I like using local client front ends (Feeddler is my fav)

RSS is too "antisocial", agreed. Everything's gotta be "social" nowadays. If the whole world doesn't know what you're doing, where you are, who you're friends with or following or not following and who's retweeting or not retweeting or tagging who and what or what not it's no longer worthwhile.

Isn't it interesting that the value of "news" is no longer in the content or reporting but the response of those consuming the news.
post #66 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

You just can't admit you were wrong and move on.

But hey, tell the world that Unix's ping utility is a cloud service for all I care. This discussion has passed the point of being useful.

Really? Alright then...

I'm tempted to say your idea of what "the cloud" encompasses is out of date (if it was ever in date) but I don't think you've given a solid definition of what you think the cloud is?

You seem to be able to say what it isn't, but you're vague on the definition of what you think it actually is.

Looking back on your posts your explanation seems to resemble SaaS more so than "the cloud"... except for email. In which case you concede that using a local email client to view emails and a cloud server to store and process emails is an example of "cloud computing" where both Twitter (where you use a local Twitter client to view tweets and a cloud server to store and process tweets) and IM (where you use a local IM client to view IM's and a cloud server to store and process IM's) are both not examples.

So give me your definition of what "the cloud" encompasses and I'll either admit that I'm wrong or give you pointers as to where you need to update your knowledge.
post #67 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

This article is supposed to paint a picture of Apple's impressively unique management architecture. But the MobileMe example unintentionally shows that their system failed miserably. First of all, how could Steve Jobs the almighty leader not be aware that MobileMe was simply not working well? How could the entire management team allow it to be launched? How is it that, two years after this impassioned outburst by Jobs, MobileMe remains essentially a dud? Clearly, neither Jobs nor his gestalt management team uses it, or they would be more aware of its failings.

Jobs likes to say that Apple makes great hardware in order to write great software. Well, MobileMe and Ping are two examples of miserable software failures. In comparison, their hardware products have a superior batting average.

And, before the shots are fired, this is not an Android troll writing, but rather a passionate Apple fan. The point here is that Apple does not seem to have the requisite DNA in writing service based software. This is not an easy thing to change. And it makes you wonder about their upcoming music locker service.

I agree with you quite a bit. It seems strange that Jobs would have delegated this much responsibility away from himself and his core team.

Ping notwithstanding, it is very strange that .Mac/ MobileMe/ iCloud has been flapping in the wind for years... One can't say Apple can't do distributed online software solutions. The iTunes Store and the App Store are really quite sophisticated and successful.

There must be some reason for the MobileMe blind spot that we don't yet know about. Yes, something in the DNA that makes them want to make me.com as beautiful as possible instead of rock-solid... But at the same time they've made the iTunes Store and App Store attractive, engaging, and with blockbuster sales.

Maybe that's the key - *SALES*. Anything online that Apple does related to a direct sale has finesse. For example, Apple Store online ordering, iTunes Store and App Store. Whereas non-direct-sales-related websites like the discussion forums, MobileMe or iWork.com do not come to the level of robustness we expect.

That's one theory, I guess.
post #68 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

RSS is too "antisocial", agreed. Everything's gotta be "social" nowadays. If the whole world doesn't know what you're doing, where you are, who you're friends with or following or not following and who's retweeting or not retweeting or tagging who and what or what not it's no longer worthwhile.

Isn't it interesting that the value of "news" is no longer in the content or reporting but the response of those consuming the news.

I think there is a benefit to social integration that's often lost in a sea of tagging, retweeting and ego trips.

Tight social integration should allow services to be tailored for the individual user. There is a feeling that this will be the next shift in the web.

They should essentially follow the same concept as "other people who purchased this item also purchased..." but far more intelligent.

Specifically I think two situations should be prioritized
  • Items that are "liked" by "friends" (whether they be actual friends or journalists/bloggers) I trust should take precedence.
  • Items that are "trending" among users that have similar interests to my own should be next on the list.

For a news feed there needs to be a service that sits on top of my RSS/Twitter/Facebook etc, groups similar items together, removes duplicates and tailors priority based on the user.

This applies to all the information we consume though, not just news feeds.
post #69 of 102
Look, no company can be great in every product category. A centralized management system makes it impossible for the key visionary to spend enough time on anything except the core products. Clearly, MobileMe is not their core product - heck, it is not even one of the legs of the stool. This is no surprise. Chewing out his team for what is really a management failure is simply not the right way to go. This is why MobileMe remains Woe is Me today. Let's face it - it is not fixed.
post #70 of 102
He is very protective of the brand, cancelling nearly finished products because they were not good enough (so I have heard). He was probably p*ssed that this one got passed his radar somehow.

That is one thing that will dog Apple once he is gone, no one with the guts to cancel things that millions have been spent on. Not-so-great products may start coming out alongside the great ones.
post #71 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by huntson View Post

I don't know how stupid you are but the reason people use the phone and like it so much is because they are willing to LIVE with the antenna gate thing.

You're a pretty classy and very smart guy, but you must have missed the memo.

When this went down, the issue with 'death grips' was demo'd on each and every competing handset. iPhone's may have been bad, but all the others had special death grips too; it's part of the tech...

I guess you missed the part about iPhone selling +10mm more handsets yoy vs #2 Samsung selling about 2mm+ yoy and everyone else being FRACTIONALLY better yoy.

(Hmmmmmmmm, maybe satisfaction has something to do w/ everything, BUT antennas. Perhaps you're right, after all. But I'd rather own $aapl than be right about the antennas.)

I'm writing to the other 'dummies' here; I'm guessing smart guys like you will miss the point again.
post #72 of 102
and he should be even more now, what with 2 years later, when dropbox functions seamlessly and idisk chokes routinely.

well, let's hope something actually good is around the corner.
post #73 of 102
I really do hope that the iCloud is MUCH better than MobileMe. I still have problems with syncing despite endless hours of email and chat exchanges with Apple MM support. My problems have twice been escalated to their senior team, with the latest one I have been waiting over 4 months for a resolution - sometime around Christmas my home events in iCal stopped syncing with my iOS devices (iPhone and iPads). The problemn is bizarre - it only affects home calendar - the work and other calendars work okay, but Apple are unable to provide a fix, and since they will not actually talk to you on the phone about MM problems getting help is tortuous - earlier comments about this being a poor product are dead right - it sucks compared to other Apple products, and has definitely tarnished the brand for me. It has wasted soooo much time, and I have even missed appointments because its hard to remember what is in which calendars on which devices (I have 2 computers and three iOS devices).
post #74 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by huntson View Post
I don't know how stupid you are but the reason people use the phone and like it so much is because they are willing to LIVE with the antenna gate thing.

The misunderstanding about the antenna continues. Many (most?) users do not have an antenna problem that is noticeably different from other phones.
post #75 of 102
So Steve Jobs saw how bad it was back then, changed the entire team and it's still all terrible.

I started on MobileMe because I wanted a well-integrated and Apple-quality service, but every part of it is slow and unreliable. They regularly delete or mangle people's data, some of which i have experienced myself.

I really don't think Apple get data processing at all. They get hardware and they get multimedia but, perhaps due to having been away from enterprise for so long, they just don't get data processing. They can't design it and they can't code it. Many of the apps and services I buy are to compensate for poor software from Apple, such as Dropbox to replace iDisk. I want to give Apple more money every year for an upgrade to 60GB iDisk, but it's slow, buggy, gives poor feedback when it fails.

So what was the point of all that ranting and blaming if it's all still crud?

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #76 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

There are some services that are far better than the MobileMe counterpart (Dropbox and SugarSync compared to iDisk are prime examples) but I dont know of a single product that competes well with MobileMe as a whole.

Some of Apples other advancements have obsolesced some of MobileMes features. For example, the syncing and backup of so many personal settings and info that go well beyond what MS Active Sync can achieve. Another is Find My iPhone which Apple made a free service thus demising its value in another way.

Others simply have no equal, like Back To My Mac which means I can input my MobileMe credentials and have access to all computers both in Finder and as a remote client without any additional setup. For $65/year I get plenty of use from the service.

It's funny that so many of the people bashing MobileMe also say "I don't use it". It really amazes me how many people while whine about a product that they don't use - and expect their whining to have any credibility.

I use MobileMe all the time and use it on several different computers and iDevices. What it does for me is:
- Add a bookmark on one computer and it's automatically on all of them.
- Add an item to iCal and it's automatically on all my computers.
- All my essential files are instantly available to all computers when I save them to iDisk. No extra steps of moving them around to drop box or anything.
- My keychain is synced to all computers.
- If I DO have to get something on my home computer that isn't on iDisk, I can go to my home computer's Finder.
- I can continue to do the same thing even when not connected to the Internet. If I make changes to one computer, it will automatically sync as soon as I connect to the Internet.

It comes close to allowing me to work on all my computers the same way without having to spend countless hours manually syncing files and worrying about where to find something. It's all automatic and I don't have to give it a second though. I want my business files? Just go to iDisk without worrying about where I put them.

I'm not aware of any other package that does all of that. Heck, I can't think of even a collection of software that does all of that, although I suppose that you might be able to find 5 or 6 different software packages that would do the same thing, but I haven't seen them.

Is it perfect? Nope. There are a few flaws. For example, when you mirror iDisk to your computer, it seems that it should be backed up with TimeMachine, but that doesn't seem to be the case (or, at least, I can't find it). I guess Apple feels that their own data center backup is sufficient. I don't agree, but it's a minor enough issue that I can live with it to get all the other advantages (once I week, I simply copy the iDisk to somewhere else on my computer so it gets backed up locally).

It's a great product and makes life much easier for many people. Unless you've actually used it enough to explore its capabilities (some of the posts here are so wrong as to be ludicrous), you shouldn't be commenting.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #77 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I don't know why this is "messed up." It sounds like appropriate chastisement to me.

What are they supposed to do after screwing up thousands of people's data? Have a group hug?

If it was me I would use the word "ashamed" more than "hate" because it's more accurate, but the general feeling is the same.

I would agree except that I think Steve is shouting at the wrong team.

The MobileMe team was probably put together from developers at Apple.
Apple has no culture or understanding of data processing, so this team never stood a chance.

Steve should look at how to build an understanding of data processing, enterprise systems, etc by building exposure. They could hire in or buy small companies, for their skills and management. They should put together a small consulting team and have them do implementations of packages at businesses. All to build the knowledge that Apple is lacking.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #78 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post

Steve Jobs has probably done more to tarnish Apple's reputation than any number of MobileMe programmers did.

1) When a number of iBook G3 units had bad logic boards and he knew about it, the tech reps were instructed to tell people calling in that they had not heard of it. They charged loyal customers $350 for the repairs until a then-popular cable show called "The Screen Savers" broke the story of just how many of the laptops had the problem. Apple then offered refunds to those who paid and offered free repairs from them on ... again... AFTER being called out on it on a TV show.

2) iPod batteries that were defective and ignored by Apple/Jobs until lawsuits were filed that might damage sales.

3) Nano batteries that did the same on a previous generation, again ignored by Jobs, until lawsuits were filed.

4) More than once issue with Powerbook batteries, known and ignored by Jobs until there were damages and lawsuits filed.

5) Shall we yet again discuss Steve Jobs telling iPhone 4 users to simply "Not hold the phone that way!", when they had reception issues??

Sorry - sounds to me like Mr. Jobs is doing a FINE job of hurting Apple's reputation little by little, without any help from the old MobileMe team.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-0...-top-spot.html

Apple Brand Value at $153 Billion Overtakes Google for Top Spot
By Tim Culpan - May 8, 2011 11:59 PM ET

Apple Inc. (AAPL), maker of the iPhone, iPad and iMac, overtook search-engine giant Google Inc. (GOOG) to become the world’s most valuable brand, WPP Plc said in a report today.

Apple’s brand value climbed 84 percent in the past year to $153.3 billion, WPP’s Millward Brown unit said. Google’s brand lost 2 percent to $111.5 billion, ending four years atop the rankings, while International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) climbed 17 percent to be the No. 3, ahead of McDonald’s Corp. (MCD)

New versions of the iPhone and iMac, and the introduction of the iPad tablet, helped Cupertino, California-based Apple almost double sales and profit for the latest quarter. Apple, which overtook Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), as the most-valuable technology company by market value in May 2010, boosted its share of the global phone market and is the leading seller of tablet computers.

“It’s clear that every single Apple employee, from Steve Jobs and Tim Cook to the summer interns, see protecting and nurturing that brand as a top priority,” Millward Brown Chief Executive Officer Eileen Campbell wrote in the report. “Tablet computing also drove value growth not just for Apple, but also for the providers who support yet another networked device.”

Facebook Inc., operator of the world’s largest social- networking site, had a 246 percent climb in brand value, the fastest, to become the No. 35 brand at $19.1 billion, according to the report. Baidu Inc., Google’s Chinese rival, posted the second-fastest climb at 141 percent, to be the No. 29 brand at $22.6 billion.

Twelve of the top 100 global brands were from China, led by China Mobile Ltd. (941) at No. 9 and Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd. at No. 11. Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN), which ranked 14th, overtook Wal-Mart Stores Inc. (WMT), which ranked 15th, to become the most-valuable retail brand.

To contact the reporter on this story: Tim Culpan in Taipei at tculpan1@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net.


----------------------------------------

http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2011/04/20results.html

Apple Reports Second Quarter Results

Record March Quarter Drives 83 Percent Revenue Growth, 95 Percent Profit Growth
Record iPhone Sales Grow 113 Percent

CUPERTINO, California—April 20, 2011—Apple® today announced financial results for its fiscal 2011 second quarter ended March 26, 2011. The Company posted record second quarter revenue of $24.67 billion and record second quarter net profit of $5.99 billion, or $6.40 per diluted share. These results compare to revenue of $13.50 billion and net quarterly profit of $3.07 billion, or $3.33 per diluted share, in the year-ago quarter. Gross margin was 41.4 percent compared to 41.7 percent in the year-ago quarter. International sales accounted for 59 percent of the quarter’s revenue.

Apple sold 3.76 million Macs during the quarter, a 28 percent unit increase over the year-ago quarter. The Company sold 18.65 million iPhones in the quarter, representing 113 percent unit growth over the year-ago quarter. Apple sold 9.02 million iPods during the quarter, representing a 17 percent unit decline from the year-ago quarter. The Company also sold 4.69 million iPads during the quarter.

“With quarterly revenue growth of 83 percent and profit growth of 95 percent, we’re firing on all cylinders,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “We will continue to innovate on all fronts throughout the remainder of the year.”

“We are extremely pleased with our record March quarter revenue and earnings and cash flow from operations of over $6.2 billion,” said Peter Oppenheimer, Apple’s CFO. “Looking ahead to the third fiscal quarter of 2011, we expect revenue of about $23 billion and we expect diluted earnings per share of about $5.03.”


----------------------------------------

http://www.neowin.net/news/report-ap...rtphone-seller

http://www.macrumors.com/2011/04/28/...uarter-profit/

http://www.google.ca/#hl=en&safe=off...676df340ff76e8
----------------------------------------

Can you remember the last time Apple *didn't* have a record quarter? I can't.

I see nothing but growth there.

You're bad at trolling.
post #79 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

It's funny that so many of the people bashing MobileMe also say "I don't use it". It really amazes me how many people while whine about a product that they don't use - and expect their whining to have any credibility.

Sort of like people here continually bash Windows, Android, Windows Phone 7, etc.? Most here wouldn't dare want to be seen using such devices, but will gladly bash them without even touching them.

Quote:
I use MobileMe all the time and use it on several different computers and iDevices. What it does for me is:
- Add a bookmark on one computer and it's automatically on all of them.
- Add an item to iCal and it's automatically on all my computers.
- All my essential files are instantly available to all computers when I save them to iDisk. No extra steps of moving them around to drop box or anything.
- My keychain is synced to all computers.
- If I DO have to get something on my home computer that isn't on iDisk, I can go to my home computer's Finder.
- I can continue to do the same thing even when not connected to the Internet. If I make changes to one computer, it will automatically sync as soon as I connect to the Internet.

It comes close to allowing me to work on all my computers the same way without having to spend countless hours manually syncing files and worrying about where to find something. It's all automatic and I don't have to give it a second though. I want my business files? Just go to iDisk without worrying about where I put them.

I'm not aware of any other package that does all of that. Heck, I can't think of even a collection of software that does all of that, although I suppose that you might be able to find 5 or 6 different software packages that would do the same thing, but I haven't seen them.

Is it perfect? Nope. There are a few flaws. For example, when you mirror iDisk to your computer, it seems that it should be backed up with TimeMachine, but that doesn't seem to be the case (or, at least, I can't find it). I guess Apple feels that their own data center backup is sufficient. I don't agree, but it's a minor enough issue that I can live with it to get all the other advantages (once I week, I simply copy the iDisk to somewhere else on my computer so it gets backed up locally).

It's a great product and makes life much easier for many people. Unless you've actually used it enough to explore its capabilities (some of the posts here are so wrong as to be ludicrous), you shouldn't be commenting.

I'm glad that you are happy with MobileMe, but I just find it ridiculous to pay Apple for a service, when there are plenty of free alternatives.

- I do automatic Boomark/Extension/Cookie/Password/etc. syncing with Google Chrome in OS X. Just simply plug in my Google credentials to any PC or Mac with Google Chrome and I can take my ENTIRE web portfolio "identity" with me. It's seamless.

- iCal? Again, iCal provides integrated Google Calendar support, so if I add an event with my iPhone, MacBook Air, or from any PC through Google Calendar, it shows up in iCal.

- All the file backup/sharing I do is accomplished with DropBox. I can share files anywhere, and even use it on my iPhone. Couldn't be happier.

So again, why the hell would I pay?
post #80 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

It's funny that so many of the people bashing MobileMe also say "I don't use it". It really amazes me how many people while whine about a product that they don't use - and expect their whining to have any credibility.

I use MobileMe all the time and use it on several different computers and iDevices. What it does for me is:
- Add a bookmark on one computer and it's automatically on all of them.
- Add an item to iCal and it's automatically on all my computers.
- All my essential files are instantly available to all computers when I save them to iDisk. No extra steps of moving them around to drop box or anything.
- My keychain is synced to all computers.
- If I DO have to get something on my home computer that isn't on iDisk, I can go to my home computer's Finder.
- I can continue to do the same thing even when not connected to the Internet. If I make changes to one computer, it will automatically sync as soon as I connect to the Internet.

It comes close to allowing me to work on all my computers the same way without having to spend countless hours manually syncing files and worrying about where to find something. It's all automatic and I don't have to give it a second though. I want my business files? Just go to iDisk without worrying about where I put them.

I'm not aware of any other package that does all of that. Heck, I can't think of even a collection of software that does all of that, although I suppose that you might be able to find 5 or 6 different software packages that would do the same thing, but I haven't seen them.

Is it perfect? Nope. There are a few flaws. For example, when you mirror iDisk to your computer, it seems that it should be backed up with TimeMachine, but that doesn't seem to be the case (or, at least, I can't find it). I guess Apple feels that their own data center backup is sufficient. I don't agree, but it's a minor enough issue that I can live with it to get all the other advantages (once I week, I simply copy the iDisk to somewhere else on my computer so it gets backed up locally).

It's a great product and makes life much easier for many people. Unless you've actually used it enough to explore its capabilities (some of the posts here are so wrong as to be ludicrous), you shouldn't be commenting.

I use it and it is crap. ( Why do I use it - the email address I have had since the .Mac/ itools day).

idisk is the worst in class. The email is alright, but the client is sloooow and sometimes hangs, the rest of your post is stuff I never use.

Meanwhile I use dropbox all the time.
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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