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Apple's iPhone trumps Android in enterprise adoption, iPad dominates

post #1 of 44
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A new survey of ActiveSync-based smartphones in the enterprise found that Apple's iPhone is the market leader with a 61 percent share and growing, while Google Android owns just 17 percent.

The business user data was released this week by Intermedia, the world's largest Microsoft Exchange hosting provider with 320,000 premium hosted Exchange e-mail accounts. In addition a strong lead for the iPhone, the data also shows market dominance for the iPad, with a 99.8 percent share of ActiveSync-based tablets.

Apple and Google were found to be the leaders in enterprise smartphone operating systems, while the remaining players -- Windows Phone, Nokia Symbian and Palm's webOS -- accounted for the 22 percent of platforms in the "other" category.

Intermedia's numbers also show that Apple's share of the enterprise continues to grow. In April, the iPhone remained the number one device, and even increased its share to 64 percent among new devices. Android's share also climbed to 33 percent for the month, showing that both platforms are making gains at the expense of competitors.

iPad share continued to remain dominant in April as well, with close to 100 percent of new tablet activations being iPads. Intermedia said it typically sees about 300 new iPads activated in its service per month, but that number jumped to over 900 in March and more than 1,200 in April.



"Professionals want to sync and manage their business email, contacts, and calendars across their computers, smartphones, and tablets," said Jonathan McCormick, chief operating officer of Intermedia. "They also want to use the brands of their choice. Supporting these options can strain an IT department accustomed to managing only one type of device -- or an entrepreneur with no IT staff to help with set up. Email services like Intermedia's deliver these productivity capabilities with the click of a mouse and back them up with 24x7 support from certified professionals."



Apple regularly boasts about the success that it has had with the iPhone in enterprise, as well as the quick adoption the iPad has found in the corporate world. In its last quarterly earnings conference call, the company revealed that 88 percent of the Fortune 500 are testing or deploying the iPhone, while 75 percent are utilizing the iPad.

Apple Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook also said that the success of the iPad and iPhone have created a "halo effect" for the Mac. As companies have made iOS-based devices a part of their employees' available tools, they have also begun buying Macs for corporate use.
post #2 of 44
This is somewhat surprising given that enterprise traditionally favors PCs over Macs (and still do). Yet you'd think they would be all over the Mac for its ease-of-use and high level of integration. It took adoption of iOS devices to get them to notice the Mac?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #3 of 44
Google "products" in general are not very appealing for corporate users. I doubt Android will ever be any more popular with corporate clients than gmail or google docs. The main reasons are (1) data security, (2) support, and (3) feature sets.
post #4 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Google "products" in general are not very appealing for corporate users. I doubt Android will ever be any more popular with corporate clients than gmail or google docs. The main reasons are (1) data security, (2) support, and (3) feature sets.

In short, 'fragmentation'.
Also, good quotes on "products".
Google's 'product' is you.
post #5 of 44
Where is the data for Blackberry does it not use ActiveSync?

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post #6 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

This is somewhat surprising given that enterprise traditionally favors PCs over Macs (and still do). Yet you'd think they would be all over the Mac for its ease-of-use and high level of integration. It took adoption of iOS devices to get them to notice the Mac?

People forget (or perhaps never knew, depending on age) just how bad things got for the Mac in the late 1990s. Not only were things bad for Apple from a business perspective, but there were a good 5 years (at least) where the Mac was technologically a mess. The Copland shipwreck left Apple with an ancient OS that had been poorly maintained and the PPC shipwreck left Apple with chips that were way slower than the Intel/AMD competition. When Jobs returned, he did as much as he could as fast as he could, but there was a lot to do and it took time. Apple managed to get the classic Mac OS back in usable shape by the time version 8 rolled around, but it was still creaking along on an ancient foundation. And the PPC G4 was a joke compared to the AMD Athlon.

It really wasn't until Tiger + Core2Duo that Apple had a product that could possibly compete for business users attention. Leopard and Snow Leopard, plus Office 2011, plus VMWare, have moved things further still. I actually think it's remarkable just how well Apple has been able to do with Macs in business given the long memories of corporate IT. It just goes to show how truly awesome Macs are today that Apple is able to overcome those well-earned prejudices.
post #7 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Where is the data for Blackberry does it not use ActiveSync?

According to Blackberry Forums it does not. Uses the Blackberry Desktop Manager instead.

http://supportforums.blackberry.com/...ync/m-p/164624

In fact I think it was the middle of last year before Android even supported Microsoft's ActiveSync, which might explain part of the low figures for enterprise adoption of Android.

But with a single line of smartphones to deal with I would definitely expect the iPhone to be an easier solution than working with different Android-based ones. Have no idea if it really is easier tho.
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post #8 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

In short, 'fragmentation'.
Also, good quotes on "products".
Google's 'product' is you.

Totally agree with you that Google's product is us.

Slight nitpick, though -- my point really wasn't about fragmentation (although that's also a good point). My point is that Google's products are all freeware, and are worth the price. For example, I use gmail for personal e-mail but I would never use it for work for exactly the three reasons I listed. And I would never pay for it. Also, I don't use it through a web browser -- I use the IMAP features. Which means that I never see any ads from Google. I figure if they're dumb enough to let me use this thing for free, I will (if they were to make gmail browser-only, I'd drop it like a bad habit). But only for stuff that isn't critical to my livelihood.
post #9 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

This is somewhat surprising given that enterprise traditionally favors PCs over Macs (and still do). Yet you'd think they would be all over the Mac for its ease-of-use and high level of integration. It took adoption of iOS devices to get them to notice the Mac?

The reason they prefer PCs, is because all the PC makers provided great support. And MSFT is extremely corporate friendly.

I mean, HP, Dell, etc., basically sign large contracts, and provide great service, and replacements etc.

The Android guys include Google, which is pretty poor at corporate support, and HTC, Motorola, Samsung, who have no idea what that even means. The only phone company with good support is RIM.

Apple is catching up, but they are WAY behind RIM.
post #10 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

This is somewhat surprising given that enterprise traditionally favors PCs over Macs (and still do). Yet you'd think they would be all over the Mac for its ease-of-use and high level of integration. It took adoption of iOS devices to get them to notice the Mac?

Apple is way behind the curve in the enterprise desktop. Most big companies are moving to Citrix terminals, with the local machine a very lightweight machine and the desktop pulled over from a huge virtualized server. They're starting to offer reasonable enterprise integration on the client just as the enterprise is starting to not care about the client computer anymore.
post #11 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

According to Blackberry Forums it does not. Uses the Blackberry Desktop Manager instead.

http://supportforums.blackberry.com/...ync/m-p/164624

RIM has its own proprietary network for handling email, so it would not appear here. This network is in fact RIMs greatest asset.

I would hesitate to read too much into these numbers as it only represents this companies own customers.
post #12 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgfsteed View Post

RIM has its own proprietary network for handling email, so it would not appear here. This network is in fact RIMs greatest asset.

I would hesitate to read too much into these numbers as it only represents this companies own customers.

I agree RIM's secure email is their greatest asset. Their enterprise solution now supports both ios and android. I imagine that corp IT will probably stay away from android though.
post #13 of 44
I don't understand why Daniel Eran Dilger writes under this pseudonym, Slash Lane, along with his other pseudonym, Prince McLean. Why doesn't he just write all of his stories under his real name?
post #14 of 44
This is due to Apple great entreprise program that allows IT to break free of the close down iOS. IT can run there own private app store for vertical applications. iOS for entreprise is pretty much a legal jailbreak.

Too bad we cant do that with the consumer iOS.
post #15 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by herbapou View Post

This is due to Apple great entreprise program that allows IT to break free of the close down iOS. IT can run there own private app store for vertical applications. iOS for entreprise is pretty much a legal jailbreak.

Too bad we cant do that with the consumer iOS.

Not really a jailbreak. You can install your own custom app but not anyone else's. Jailbreak allows you to install any app you want. Big difference.

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post #16 of 44
Note that this report doesn't count ANY companies that use Gapps (which can use iOS OR Android)

Google has over 3 million businesses registered for Gapps, both large and small.

Even with those factors, iOS most likely has a higher adoption rate than android overall, but whatever this report gives, it's not an accurate representation.
post #17 of 44
As I've said before, I don't think giving employees Iphone or Android phones is a good idea. They'd just use these phones to Facebook/Twitter/play games etc, and won't concentrate on work.
post #18 of 44
Boy, this whole report smells of cherry picking some data to make a particular product (iPhone in this case) look good. Not questioning the results, just the relevancy.
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booga View Post

Apple is way behind the curve in the enterprise desktop. Most big companies are moving to Citrix terminals, with the local machine a very lightweight machine and the desktop pulled over from a huge virtualized server. They're starting to offer reasonable enterprise integration on the client just as the enterprise is starting to not care about the client computer anymore.

Good points... although given Apple's tiny share of the corporate market, there is still room for Apple to gain a lot of sales here even with the issues you mention. Not everybody is or will go to the huge virtualized server approach -- some users are still going to need powerful clients. Also, it's easy to imagine that Apple might one day sell an iOS based thin client that could serve as a hub for other iDevices and then also act as a terminal to the huge virtualized server.

Really, Jobs whole truck vs car analogy is where the industry is heading and apple is well positioned for it. Microsoft is stuck in the 1990s and Google is just an ad company.
post #20 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Good points... although given Apple's tiny share of the corporate market, there is still room for Apple to gain a lot of sales here even with the issues you mention. Not everybody is or will go to the huge virtualized server approach -- some users are still going to need powerful clients. Also, it's easy to imagine that Apple might one day sell an iOS based thin client that could serve as a hub for other iDevices and then also act as a terminal to the huge virtualized server.

Really, Jobs whole truck vs car analogy is where the industry is heading and apple is well positioned for it. Microsoft is stuck in the 1990s and Google is just an ad company.

Since I switched to a Mac at work, with Parallels and Windows 7 for "emergencies", I've been amazed by how little I've needed to fire up Windows. It's probably less than once per week.

The Mac has proven tremendous in the enterprise for me.
post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

The reason they prefer PCs, is because all the PC makers provided great support. And MSFT is extremely corporate friendly.

I mean, HP, Dell, etc., basically sign large contracts, and provide great service, and replacements etc.


There, I fixed it for you.
post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by scotty321 View Post

I don't understand why Daniel Eran Dilger writes under this pseudonym, Slash Lane, along with his other pseudonym, Prince McLean. Why doesn't he just write all of his stories under his real name?

I don't understand why you care.
post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Google "products" in general are not very appealing for corporate users. I doubt Android will ever be any more popular with corporate clients than gmail or google docs. The main reasons are (1) data security, (2) support, and (3) feature sets.

First, there are over 3 million companies that use Google Apps for Business, including some large firms in "Security" sensitive fields.

1) Gapps are fully SAS 70 Type II complient, they're one of the first cloud management suites to get certified by FISMA. Google apps also has several android apps that increase security on the device (and allow device administrators to lock down devices as much as they want). They also make no claim to the data and allow companies to opt out of the advertising system, so the data isn't even scanned for anything but malware/spam. What kind of security are they missing? Sure, they don't have the super encryption of BES, but neither does iOS.

2) Again, 3 million companies and thousands of schools beg to differ.

3) What features?
post #24 of 44
NVidea stock got hammered after disappointing earnings. Their processors were supposed to be used in many iPad competitors and the stock had gone up in expectation. Looks like most of these iPad competing products are DOA. It is beginning to look like Honeycomb its is DOA.

With many common apps being used in the iPhone and iPad, there is reduced incentive for an iPad user to buy an Android phone
post #25 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Menno View Post

First, there are over 3 million companies that use Google Apps for Business, including some large firms in "Security" sensitive fields.

1) Gapps are fully SAS 70 Type II complient, they're one of the first cloud management suites to get certified by FISMA. Google apps also has several android apps that increase security on the device (and allow device administrators to lock down devices as much as they want). They also make no claim to the data and allow companies to opt out of the advertising system, so the data isn't even scanned for anything but malware/spam. What kind of security are they missing? Sure, they don't have the super encryption of BES, but neither does iOS.

2) Again, 3 million companies and thousands of schools beg to differ.

3) What features?

Menno, the paid Google astroturfer, steps in with the company line defense...
post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Menno, the paid Google astroturfer, steps in with the company line defense...

Twice.

I wonder how much it pays to be a Google shill.
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post #27 of 44
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Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Twice.

I wonder how much it pays to be a Google shill.

It must pay OK. He's obviously spending so much time defending Google that he can't be working another job, too.
post #28 of 44
In light of what is said here in this article. In might be suggested to RIM they should tone down their ads about being the professional Tablet on the market. Or perhaps, it is that being an ""also ran"" is "PROFESSIONAL", in their eyes. Well let them dream they are doing very little harm.
post #29 of 44
Let's consider the pair of phones I have here on my desk.

One is a Galaxy S.
The other is an iPhone 4.
Both are connected to ActiveSync.

One of these supports on-device encryption natively. One does not.

Guess which one?

I send both of them the Remote Wipe command, which both claim to support.
One of them almost INSTANTLY wipes itself by destroying the AES key, rendering the data unrecoverable.
The other one does nothing, and reports falsely back that it wiped itself.

Again, guess which did what.

Now, guess which one we want in our environment?
post #30 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by htoelle View Post

In light of what is said here in this article. In might be suggested to RIM they should tone down their ads about being the professional Tablet on the market. Or perhaps, it is that being an ""also ran"" is "PROFESSIONAL", in their eyes. Well let them dream they are doing very little harm.

Well, bear in mind that prostitutes call themselves "professionals" as well.

Seems to apply, because RIM is certainly getting [redacted] a lot lately.
post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Menno View Post

First, there are over 3 million companies that use Google Apps for Business

Ha, yeah right. The only way that number can possibly be right is if you use the broadest possible definition of "company".

Here are some relevant numbers for the US:

http://www.census.gov/econ/smallbus.html

As you can see, the broadest definition of business includes 27 million businesses. But that includes "businesses" with no employees other than the owner. So basically it includes everyone who made a few hundred bucks from consulting and gave themselves a company name in TurboTax.

So under that ridiculously broad definition, Gapps are used by just 11 percent of "businesses". But that assumes your 3 million number refers to the US. My guess is you went as big as you could, and so it probably refers to the world.

Tell me how many Fortune 500 or 1000 companies are using Gapps for anything other than novelty/entertainment purposes. I'll wait and listen to the crickets.
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Menno, the paid Google astroturfer, steps in with the company line defense...

Oh, come on anonymouse. You're equal and opposite (actually a little more than equal). I think you've got DED bulimia. You binge on the articles he writes and then purge all over the comment threads. It's gross.

(Noted that DED didn't write this one)
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by htoelle View Post

In light of what is said here in this article. In might be suggested to RIM they should tone down their ads about being the professional Tablet on the market. Or perhaps, it is that being an ""also ran"" is "PROFESSIONAL", in their eyes. Well let them dream they are doing very little harm.

I've often wondered why an ad for a Professional Tablet would show the user playing games.
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Ha, yeah right. The only way that number can possibly be right is if you use the broadest possible definition of "company".

Here are some relevant numbers for the US:

http://www.census.gov/econ/smallbus.html

As you can see, the broadest definition of business includes 27 million businesses. But that includes "businesses" with no employees other than the owner. So basically it includes everyone who made a few hundred bucks from consulting and gave themselves a company name in TurboTax.

So under that ridiculously broad definition, Gapps are used by just 11 percent of "businesses". But that assumes your 3 million number refers to the US. My guess is you went as big as you could, and so it probably refers to the world.

Tell me how many Fortune 500 or 1000 companies are using Gapps for anything other than novelty/entertainment purposes. I'll wait and listen to the crickets.

His figure apparently came directly from the Google Apps for Business page. http://www.google.com/apps/intl/en/c...ndex.html#tab0

All you had to do was Google "How many companies use Google Apps for Business" and you could have found it yourself.
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post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Ha, yeah right. The only way that number can possibly be right is if you use the broadest possible definition of "company".

Here are some relevant numbers for the US:

http://www.census.gov/econ/smallbus.html

As you can see, the broadest definition of business includes 27 million businesses. But that includes "businesses" with no employees other than the owner. So basically it includes everyone who made a few hundred bucks from consulting and gave themselves a company name in TurboTax.

So under that ridiculously broad definition, Gapps are used by just 11 percent of "businesses". But that assumes your 3 million number refers to the US. My guess is you went as big as you could, and so it probably refers to the world.

Tell me how many Fortune 500 or 1000 companies are using Gapps for anything other than novelty/entertainment purposes. I'll wait and listen to the crickets.

http://www.google.com/apps/intl/en/customers/index.html

Doing searches is hard. And note, that's just the companies that gave consent for Google to use their name. Not every company wants their brand to be associated with the products they use (even if they have no issues with said products)
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

According to Blackberry Forums it does not. Uses the Blackberry Desktop Manager instead.

http://supportforums.blackberry.com/...ync/m-p/164624

This is incorrect. Blackberry devices connect to a secure Blackberry Enterprise Server that integrates with Microsoft Exchange and enables their push email service.

The confusion arises from the fact that Microsoft has used the term "Active Sync" for two entirely different things. "Exchange Active Sync" is the push-based email/contact synch protocol that the iPhone/Android uses. Most people think of this when referring to "Active Sync".

The original "Active Sync", which is referenced in the url you posted, was an application that ran on windows that synchronized email/contact/calendar data between a PocketPC/Windows Mobile device and a PC.
post #37 of 44
What's a "Huawei" ?

Sounds like something I shouldn't eat, and basically avoid altogether.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

What's a "Huawei" ?

Our 50th state? Just a guess...
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakefinance View Post

Oh, come on anonymouse. You're equal and opposite (actually a little more than equal).

Well, no, since I have no connection of any kind (other than as a not significant customer) with any of the persons or companies under discussion here, we may be opposed, but we are not equal. One of us (Menno, for the slow and DED haters) engages in dishonesty and deception in ever word he posts.
post #40 of 44
A good report for android. While apple have four times the market penetration for this company, current activations favour apple 2:1. As long as this is lower thn 4:1 android are gaining ground on apple. If it stays at 2:1 then figures will continue to improve for andoid until the total ratio aproaches 2:1.

But we know, given trends over the last 12 months, that current activations will grow closer to 1:1, then Android will take over from apple. The writing is on the wall. RIP ios
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