or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › RIM recalls 1,000 PlayBooks, Nvidia CEO explains slow Android tablet sales
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

RIM recalls 1,000 PlayBooks, Nvidia CEO explains slow Android tablet sales

post #1 of 179
Thread Starter 
Research in Motion has recalled about 1,000 defective units of its new PlayBook tablet, though most had not yet been sold to users. And in an interview, Nvidia's CEO provided a number of reasons why Android-based tablets aren't selling well yet.

RIM recalls about 1,000 PlayBooks

Research in Motion has issued a recall for about 1,000 faulty BlackBerry PlayBooks that were available at Staples retail stores, as first reported by Engadget. The affected devices were said to have a defective build of the touchscreen tablet's operating system.

The site has a complete list of affected serial numbers, so any owners can check to see if their device is part of the problem batch. But RIM also commented on the issue and said most of the devices were in the retail channel and were not sold to end users.

Staples stores were issued a copy of the recall last week, and employees were instructed to pull any inventory with the affected serial numbers. The issue caused users to be unable to set up their new PlayBook.

The PlayBook debuted in April to lukewarm reviews, which indicated that the device seemed to be released to the public without quite being finished. One review suggested the 7-inch device, which RIM hopes will compete with Apple's iPad, seemed "rushed to market."



Nvidia CEO talks Android tablet struggles

Nvidia's chief executive, Jen-Hsun Huang, spoke last week with Cnet (via Hardmac) about slow sales of the first tablets running Android 3.0 Honeycomb. Nvidia makes the Tegra 2 graphics processor found in devices like the Motorola Xoom.

Huang gave a number of reasons why the first Honeycomb-powered tablets haven't had a strong start. Specifically with regard to the Xoom, he said the initial model introduced should not have included 3G, and should have been a Wi-Fi-only option.

"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."

Huang also went on to offer a more positive outlook regarding upcoming products. He noted that the initial struggles are just the first batch of Android 3.0 tablets, and improvements will be made.

"Those problems are all getting solved," he said. "The rate at which these Honeycomb Tegra 2 tablets are being improved is really stunning. I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."



Various reports have indicated that sales of the Motorola Xoom were lower than expected, and projections have been slashed to 100,000, though actual sales figures have not been announced. Future tablets running Honeycomb are said to have been delayed to address issues with the fledgling tablet-only operating system and assess the market, as Apple continues to dominate the market with its iPad.
post #2 of 179
Give it up RIM. It's just not going to work out.
post #3 of 179
Quote:
"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."

So, you're saying: No one can find them to buy, no one knows how to sell them, no one wants to advertise them, they cost too much and have nothing useful you can do with them. OK I understand now.
post #4 of 179
The number of missteps taken by Android tablet manufactures so far is amazing. Greedy pricing, failure to recognize the limited market for 3G/4G models, ineffective marketing plans. Couple that with with an OS that looks like it was released before it was fully-cooked just to satisfy a few who wanted to push out tablet models before the launch of Apple's iPad2.

I agree with NVidia's chief that some of these guys may finally be seeing how their tablets should be marketed, what features are important and what price-points are most effective. Acer's Iconia and especially Asus' Transformer may see some success. I haven't seen any mention whether Honeycomb 3.1 has addressed most of the earlier OS complaints, so I won't comment on that. I have seen some press reports of various Android tablet optimized apps noted, but again don't know how many there are now or even if tablet-specific versions are needed in most cases. No idea.

But the early entries were certainly less than they could and should have been.
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #5 of 179
...The Good News is that the majority of the 1.000 units are Still In The Channel and have Not Been Sold To End Users!
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #6 of 179
All together now, folks:

1. Point
2. Laugh

post #7 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."

Oh dear.
post #8 of 179
I saw this in action when I stopped by a Staples the one day. I decided to check out the Playbook and give it a fair shake. When I walked up to the display, it was completely disheveled. The device was lopsided on the stand and the screen was half filled and stretched. Complete unusable. Next to the device as a sign printed on a piece of regular paper that said you need to download an update and it takes 30 minutes on a broadband connection.

Why on EARTH would you buy this load of crap?
post #9 of 179
"I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."

So this time they 'plan' on making a device that actually works? How much market research did it take to arrive at that decision?
post #10 of 179
Bottom line is that Apple brings out new products that are well thought out. The iPad was brought to market when it was ready to offer consumers lots of useful, polished applications.

What is underestimated, though, is the most important aspect of the iPad at launch. Price.

No one thought a decent tablet could be brought to market, at that time, for such a reasonable price and by taking away probably the only card the competition would have had to play, Apple ended this war before it even started.

Software is incredibly cheap and so easy to acquire and install, so any whining about Apple using a closed system matters very little to the end user. Industrial design is something Apple has always done better. Apple has a decided advantage now and with significant annual updates, how likely is it that the competition will ever catch up, let alone surpass Apple's efforts.

If Apple was working on the iPad for years, why is it that the competition is only now struggling to respond. And what does it matter that a year from now competing tablets will become about as polished and capable as the iPad 2 for a competitive price when a year from now Apple will be selling the iPad 3.

To turn this into a legitimate competition, a competitor has to leapfrog what Apple has accomplished and considering all of them seem to be stumbling around trying to catch up, with that catch-up months away (around the time when Apple will raise the bar with the next iPad), it's not hard to figure out where this is headed.

So by my calculations, you have to figure out what the iPad 3 is likely to be and offer something similar months before the likely January/February 2012 introduction. We are likely to see a lighter device with more power, more memory, a higher-resolution screen, better cameras, and OS enhancements with no change in price. Are we going to see a competitor bring to market a device able to take on such an iPad 3, only be available to consumers in time for this coming Christmas? Possible but not likely.

So there it is. That's the challenge. If what we have in time for Christmas are tablets that are at least competitive with the iPad 2, too little, too late.
post #11 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by msuberly View Post

Give it up RIM. It's just not going to work out.

I actually hope they figure it out and do well. More competition is better for the market. It will push innovation at a faster pace. Yes, even as good as Apple's products are, I believe they could do even better if they had some competition nipping at their heels.
post #12 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Research in Motion has recalled about 1,000 defective units of its new PlayBook tablet.

So they've recalled all of them then.
post #13 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

"I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."

So this time they 'plan' on making a device that actually works? How much market research did it take to arrive at that decision?

Apparently a lot.\
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
melior diabolus quem scies
Reply
post #14 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

"I think all of the manufacturers have now recognized that and readjusted their plans."

So this time they 'plan' on making a device that actually works? How much market research did it take to arrive at that decision?

why do you think the playbook doesn't have email? they spent the time alloted for it to think about if they should make it work when it arrives

PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

Reply

PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

Reply
post #15 of 179
Quote:
"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."

That is an awfully long list of pretty fundamental problems, and so far I don't see any clear solutions...
post #16 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

To turn this into a legitimate competition, a competitor has to leapfrog what Apple has accomplished...

Not really. They just need to be good enough to offer a viable alternative. Android phones fumbled around for awhile at first, but now are giving Apple some competition. They didn't "leapfrog" the iPhone. They offered good options as an alternative.

Believe it or not, not everyone drinks the Apple Kool-Aid. Some people want choices which Apple refuse to offer. And I know a growing number of people who are anti-Apple because of that lack of choice and the "my way or the highway" attitude. Sure, Apple has the best option right now, but that doesn't mean it fits everyone's needs.
post #17 of 179
The problem for Android tablets is iPad. No need to get any fancier than that CEO's of America haha
post #18 of 179
"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."

or Huang could've just said in three words: "it's a mess."
post #19 of 179
I didn't know there were other notebooks on the market, only the iPad.
post #20 of 179
I wonder wether DaHarder was lucky to get his 3 or 5 PlayBooks, that are actually functioning?
post #21 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by EyeNsteinNo View Post

I didn't know there were other notebooks on the market, only the iPad.

iPad = notebook ???
post #22 of 179
Quote:
"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."

Now say that in 4 words or less: It's not an iPad.
post #23 of 179
RIM is burying themselves with disastrous PR for this one device alone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Urinal Mint View Post

All together now, folks:

1. Point
2. Laugh


To the tune of Nelson Muntz, of course: "Ha, HA!"
post #24 of 179
Apple did a very difficult but successful maneuver on the parallel bars and made it look really easy... the other kids on the block thought there was nothing to it, tried to do it themselves and the results have been contusions, concussions, lacerations, 3rd degree burns and broken bones.
Hmmmmmm...
Reply
Hmmmmmm...
Reply
post #25 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urinal Mint View Post

All together now, folks:

1. Point
2. Laugh


Enjoy your laugh now. Then again, perhaps your laugh will continue for a while, I don't know. I do know that today's Android phone market is larger than the iOS market. It's tough to laugh at Android handsets. At least today. Once upon a time, Android phones were weak. Rushed to market. The only appeal was that they weren't Apple products. And yet they still sold. Today, Android phones are represent a pretty decent platform. A true alternative to iOS. I suspect that Android on tablets will come around as well. You may be laughing at something that will come back to bite you.
post #26 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkichline View Post

I saw this in action when I stopped by a Staples the one day. I decided to check out the Playbook and give it a fair shake. When I walked up to the display, it was completely disheveled. The device was lopsided on the stand and the screen was half filled and stretched. Complete unusable. Next to the device as a sign printed on a piece of regular paper that said you need to download an update and it takes 30 minutes on a broadband connection.

Why on EARTH would you buy this load of crap?

I think this is more indicative of the quality of Staples than the Playbook.
post #27 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilM View Post

So they've recalled all of them then.

I wonder what their value might be in the recycling industry? 5$ per tablet?
post #28 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMacGuy View Post

So, you're saying: No one can find them to buy, no one knows how to sell them, no one wants to advertise them, they cost too much and have nothing useful you can do with them. OK I understand now.


nothing like cutting to the meat



"RIM is burying themselves with disastrous PR for this one device alone."

but we have heard over and over how to forget the past this is the future of RIM, and how this alone will rescue BB and RIM, well enterprise sees the writing on the wall, RIM can't provide the support of the products, which os to use and continue supporting, too fragmented to really care. enterprise is moving AWAY from RIM to android and iOS
RIM's big players, enterprise are moving on
there was a good article about the the future of RIM and it wasn't pretty when i find it i will post

RIM is in deep deep trouble

found the article:

http://www.macworld.com/article/1598...lackberry.html
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
Reply
post #29 of 179
Wow, I bet that really puts a huge dent in their supply chain.
post #30 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

If Apple was working on the iPad for years, why is it that the competition is only now struggling to respond. And what does it matter that a year from now competing tablets will become about as polished and capable as the iPad 2 for a competitive price when a year from now Apple will be selling the iPad 3.

To turn this into a legitimate competition, a competitor has to leapfrog what Apple has accomplished and considering all of them seem to be stumbling around trying to catch up, with that catch-up months away (around the time when Apple will raise the bar with the next iPad), it's not hard to figure out where this is headed.

So by my calculations, you have to figure out what the iPad 3 is likely to be and offer something similar months before the likely January/February 2012 introduction. We are likely to see a lighter device with more power, more memory, a higher-resolution screen, better cameras, and OS enhancements with no change in price. Are we going to see a competitor bring to market a device able to take on such an iPad 3, only be available to consumers in time for this coming Christmas? Possible but not likely.

So there it is. That's the challenge. If what we have in time for Christmas are tablets that are at least competitive with the iPad 2, too little, too late.

Apple is a software company that makes their own hardware. They have iTunes and the iTunes store to integrate with. They have great developer tools with XCode and a simple way for developers to get their software to users. Until a competitor can cover all three areas: PC integration, content delivery, and developer tools; they aren't going to compete.

Microsoft could have had a chance, but they don't make their own hardware, and their OS is intentionally generic allowing hardware manufacturers to butcher the user experience. Android has the same OS-hardware disconnect. Google is trying to get the content delivery working, but they seem to be angering the content owners.

Sony would be a good candidate to compete, too. But apparently they can't write software or understand user interfaces to save their life.

- Jasen.
post #31 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

Enjoy your laugh now. Then again, perhaps your laugh will continue for a while, I don't know. I do know that today's Android phone market is larger than the iOS market. It's tough to laugh at Android handsets. At least today. Once upon a time, Android phones were weak. Rushed to market. The only appeal was that they weren't Apple products. And yet they still sold. Today, Android phones are represent a pretty decent platform. A true alternative to iOS. I suspect that Android on tablets will come around as well. You may be laughing at something that will come back to bite you.

So the tablet market's story has yet to be written, but the Android phone market is all sewn up. We'll see I guess.

iPhone 3GSs are out selling Android phones for pete's sake. Every Android phone that is annointed 'iPhone-killer" is forgotten less than three months after its release. Android, I suspect, is burning through its customers in the US via these BOGO. In other words, companies tend to drop the prices as they move from consuming early adopters, then mainstream, then the latecomers. Android may already by at the end of the curve by giving away the hardware. The broke and the cheapies simply don't make good customers. Look at how much money is being made by iOS developers vs. Android developers.

I mean, let's say Android domintes the low end in India, Brazil and China via the carriers giving away the phones, how does that benefit software developers in say the US? How do you get money of these people? Simple. You don't.

The PC market is having the exact same problem, except where Google is making all the money in phones, its MS in PCs. Yet, in both cases Apple is making more still cleaning up and growing share.

In addition, the Android phone market is NOT larger than the iOS market. That is simply untrue. iOS had sold more units and iPhones have sold more than probably the 4 top Android vendors. I am very interested in what iPhone 5 will do even though I know how it will turn out in the US. If the iPhone 4 is outselling the newest Android LTE phones like the Thunderbolt, I suspect that the iPhone 5 will dominate on Verizon to even a larger degree.
post #32 of 179
Apparently amateur hour isn't quite over yet.
post #33 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Not really. They just need to be good enough to offer a viable alternative. Android phones fumbled around for awhile at first, but now are giving Apple some competition. They didn't "leapfrog" the iPhone. They offered good options as an alternative.

Sure, Apple has the best option right now, but that doesn't mean it fits everyone's needs.

I agree and surely that is the point stacked against the iPad clones. What could the unique selling point be? Price, but that will be a junk system. Flash? If it was such a selling point, PC vendors would have been pitching theirs as better at it and they don't, it is marginal. Can take a USB stick, handy if a given app uses it, bit better than marginal. Better apps and media, hardly. A better camera? What for, a tablet is too big, laptop vendors haven't been leading the pack based on camera. Better web? But it will come up as a mobile device so you will have the same limits. Availability (in the USA only) was where android phones scored, a non issue with tablets.

One area, in my opinion THE area is producitivity apps. A real word/excel option, the iPad is still weak there. Android is even weaker with little hope or interest in making a leap forward. So we have to wait for Microkia really. Not to say android tablets won't sell but not in the volume. There is no compelling reason, sure for the minority of geeks you mention who feel they are above it all, so.

The company that produces a tablet that matches the iPad adequately and offer Word and Excel with full editing of any document. There is the opportunity.

Avai
you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
Reply
you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
Reply
post #34 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

Enjoy your laugh now. Then again, perhaps your laugh will continue for a while, I don't know. I do know that today's Android phone market is larger than the iOS market. It's tough to laugh at Android handsets. At least today. Once upon a time, Android phones were weak. Rushed to market. The only appeal was that they weren't Apple products. And yet they still sold. Today, Android phones are represent a pretty decent platform. A true alternative to iOS. I suspect that Android on tablets will come around as well. You may be laughing at something that will come back to bite you.

You are missing the reason for the tremendous "success" of the android market share. The reason that they have grown to where they are is is simply because they offer them for free or in 2 for 1 deals.

Without that, their rate of growth wouldn't have been nearly as fast and their success would have been non existent.

Now what you're seeing with the tablets is that they have to stand on their own feet with no subsidies, no freebies and priced high enough that people would rather spend that money on a product with a big name behind it and one that is also "trendy" like the iPad.
post #35 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eternal Emperor View Post

So the tablet market's story has yet to be written, but the Android phone market is all sewn up. We'll see I guess.

iPhone 3GSs are out selling Android phones for pete's sake. Every Android phone that is annointed 'iPhone-killer" is forgotten less than three months after its release. Android, I suspect, is burning through its customers in the US via these BOGO. In other words, companies tend to drop the prices as they move from consuming early adopters, then mainstream, then the latecomers. Android may already by at the end of the curve by giving away the hardware. The broke and the cheapies simply don't make good customers. Look at how much money is being made by iOS developers vs. Android developers.

I mean, let's say Android domintes the low end in India, Brazil and China via the carriers giving away the phones, how does that benefit software developers in say the US? How do you get money of these people? Simple. You don't.

The PC market is having the exact same problem, except where Google is making all the money in phones, its MS in PCs. Yet, in both cases Apple is making more still cleaning up and growing share.

In addition, the Android phone market is NOT larger than the iOS market. That is simply untrue. iOS had sold more units and iPhones have sold more than probably the 4 top Android vendors. I am very interested in what iPhone 5 will do even though I know how it will turn out in the US. If the iPhone 4 is outselling the newest Android LTE phones like the Thunderbolt, I suspect that the iPhone 5 will dominate on Verizon to even a larger degree.

All hail The Eternal Emperor for a darn good post!

(I actually mean that.)
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
Knowing what you are talking about would help you understand why you are so wrong. By "Realistic" - AI Forum Member
Reply
post #36 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

I actually hope they figure it out and do well. More competition is better for the market. It will push innovation at a faster pace. Yes, even as good as Apple's products are, I believe they could do even better if they had some competition nipping at their heels.

Apple does not need outside competition to drive them -- they compete with themselves.

Sometimes, a competitor will offer a [perceived] similar product before Apple -- the LG Prada phone comes to mind. Then everyone claims that the competitor beat Apple to market and Apple copied their product.

On sober review of the situation, you realize that Apple has spent years designing and perfecting a total solution -- while the competitor's product is shoddy and rushed to market.

To paraphrase an Orson Wells ad (no not the frozen peas ad) -- Apple will release no product before its time.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #37 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

I actually hope they figure it out and do well. More competition is better for the market. It will push innovation at a faster pace. Yes, even as good as Apple's products are, I believe they could do even better if they had some competition nipping at their heels.

Local file management, file sharing, printing... to name three areas that could be improved. The two first are really one, I guess.
post #38 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Believe it or not, not everyone drinks the Apple Kool-Aid. Some people want choices which Apple refuse to offer. And I know a growing number of people who are anti-Apple because of that lack of choice and the "my way or the highway" attitude. Sure, Apple has the best option right now, but that doesn't mean it fits everyone's needs.

While I agree that Android is a worthy competitor to iOS now, and a good alternative to an iPhone for many people, I disagree that it has anything to do with choice. That's just the same hollow reasoning you get from the 'anti-Apple' people you mentioned, but it's completely meaningless. People aren't anti-Apple because Android offers more choice, in fact for typical customers Android offers less. The fact that you can sideload applications, hook up a mouse or a printer, connect your phone over HDMI or flash custom ROMS, it's all so far removed from what 'normal people' do with their phones that it doesn't even cross their mind when buying a phone. The choices people care about are 'can I use Netflix on it', 'can I install Angry Birds on it', 'does it have WhatsApp and Skype', 'how easy is it to operate the thing', etc. In terms of quality applications iOS provides more choice, not less.

I have yet to meet the first person in real life who admits to buying an Android phone because it offers him/here 'more choice'. My observation is that the only choice people want to make about a smartphone is 'do I want to spend that much $$$ on a device that looks and works like this?'. If they conclude the iPhone is too expensive and they played around with an Android phone and it looks ok to them, they will go for the Android phone. I'd estimate the percentage of potential buyers who eventually decide to not buy an iPhone because they think it 'offers them less choice' is close to 1%. People always think they want more choice, but actually they don't want more than 2 or 3 choices, otherwise they lose their overview and get all stressed out because after they choose one of the many available choices, the idea they might have made the wrong choice because they didn't have the time or energy to research all their options will keep nagging.

I think people don't 'hate Apple' because Apple gives you less choice, people 'hate Apple' because it's human nature for many people to hate on something succesful, especially something succesful that isn't cheap. That's really all there is to it. It's the Microsoft effect from 10 years back, but now it's Apple who draws all the attention.
post #39 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post

Apple is a software company that makes their own hardware. They have iTunes and the iTunes store to integrate with. They have great developer tools with XCode and a simple way for developers to get their software to users. Until a competitor can cover all three areas: PC integration, content delivery, and developer tools; they aren't going to compete.

Microsoft could have had a chance, but they don't make their own hardware, and their OS is intentionally generic allowing hardware manufacturers to butcher the user experience. Android has the same OS-hardware disconnect. Google is trying to get the content delivery working, but they seem to be angering the content owners.

Sony would be a good candidate to compete, too. But apparently they can't write software or understand user interfaces to save their life.

- Jasen.

Add in the fact that RIM has punted on creating their own application programming interface. They've just hacked out some method allowing them to run Android apps. And they've stolen bits of their user interface from webOS. Plus no email, calendar, etc. Definitely rushed to market.

I have higher hopes for Microsoft. I fully expect them to be making their own phones within a few years. (Nokia purchase or merger).
post #40 of 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


"It's a point of sales problem. It's an expertise problem. It's a marketing problem to consumers. It's a price point problem," he reportedly said, adding: "And it's a software richness of content problem."

Other than that .... it's great, just perfect ... magical, you might say!
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
Reply
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPad
  • RIM recalls 1,000 PlayBooks, Nvidia CEO explains slow Android tablet sales
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPad › RIM recalls 1,000 PlayBooks, Nvidia CEO explains slow Android tablet sales