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FCC, FTC invite Apple to location services forum

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
The U.S. Federal Communications Commission and Federal Trade Commission announced Tuesday they had invited Apple and Google to a June 28 "public education forum" on the benefits and risks of location-based services.

The FCC indicated that the forum will aid agency staff in producing a report on location-based services that could recommend regulation to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and other commissioners, The Los Angeles Times reports.

In addition to Apple and Google, other technology companies, wireless providers, consumer groups and academics have been invited to participate in next month's hearing.

"Over the last few years, [location-based services] have become an important part of the mobile market and a boon to the economy," the FCC said Tuesday. "Commercial location-based services include applications that help consumers find the lowest-priced product nearby or the nearest restaurant.... But recent reports have raised concerns about the location-based information that is gathered when consumers use mobile devices."

According to the report, topics at the forum will include: "how location-based services work, their benefits and risks, and information parents should know about location tracking of children using mobile devices."

The joint FCC and FTC hearing will mark the third time that Apple has been called to testify before lawmakers on the issue. Apple testified last week at a Senate Judiciary Subcommittee hearing and will serve as a witness at a Consumer Protection, Safety and Insurance Subcommittee hearing on Thursday.



Security researchers drew attention to the location data privacy issue last month when they published a report claiming that an unencrypted database file in iOS 4 stored users' location information for as long as a year. Apple responded that the file was actually a database of nearby Wi-Fi hotspots and cell towers used to help an iPhone calculate its location.

As for the size of the file, Apple attributed the issue to a bug in iOS and has since resolved the problem with the release of iOS 4.3.3. According to Apple, the iOS update reduces the size of the cache, no longer backs up the cache to iTunes and deletes the cache when Location Services is turned off.
post #2 of 14
"We're the government, and we're here to help!"
post #3 of 14
Maybe they can include a topic on how dangerous it is to run android near wifi even with location services turned off!
post #4 of 14
Is there any goddamned thing these people don't want to stick their noses in?.... Don't answer that.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

Get the lowdown on the coming collapse:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45010

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

Get the lowdown on the coming collapse:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45010

Reply
post #5 of 14
Such a waste of taxpayer money.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

You don't feel that Apple can be taught the basics of privacy and how to implement it in its products?

They don't need to be. Because they haven't violated them.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Apparently 3 Congressional hearings and several lawsuits disagree with you.

This is a widespread problem. Burying your head in the sand isn't going to make it go away.

There are worse places.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

"We're the government, and we're here to help!"

You left out a word: "We're the government, and we're here to help [ourselves]!"


Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Is there any goddamned thing these people don't want to stick their noses in?.... Don't answer that.

The oligopoly with SMS data costs, any potential data mining of my SMS data, and the inability to get my property unlocked after Ive satisfied my contractual obligations.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

Such a waste of taxpayer money.

A waste of Tax Payer Money are the 50+ billion in Corn and Oil Subsidies.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

22000 posts and not a single one worth reading.

Oh. I'm sure the man is mortally wounded by such an overused cliche.
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

22000 posts and not a single one worth reading.

Trying to catch up, are you?
post #12 of 14
Lot's of anti-government sentiment, not a lot of actual discussion. Do we really need to cover why it's the government's business because it's the people's business? Does the government often actually side with the people vs. corporate interests? Not often these days, but that's because people, against their self-interest, out of an immature sense that, "no one's gonna tell me what to do," keep voting for politician's who don't believe government should do anything. We saw how well that philosophy worked out under Bush after Katrina.

Protecting privacy against corporate invasion is at least as important as protecting it against government violation, especially as corporations gain more and more power. So, yes, the government's nose belongs in this business and the people deserve to have their liberty and privacy protected from corporate cyberstalkers. Unfortunately, until people start voting for politicians who believe that America is about liberty, and not just about making a buck any way possible, not much of substance is likely to change until some huge abuse of privacy turns into a scandal.

And, I'm almost certain that magicj is MacTripper.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Apparently 3 Congressional hearings and several lawsuits disagree with you.

This is a widespread problem. Burying your head in the sand isn't going to make it go away.

Paranoid much?

Did you know that your home could be monitored by security agents that you paid for? You don't know what information they're collecting on you but you trust them enough to monitor your home.

Did you know that late model security systems monitor your car's location and yet you pay for that. You also don't know what information they are collecting and yet you pay them for the service so that when your car is nicked or you're lost on the road you can find your car or your way.

Why do we trust navigation systems or home security systems and yet a company like Apple - who has NEVER shown they do anything with the information they gather - gets railed on?

The benefits outweigh the risks in my not so humble opinion.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Lot's of anti-government sentiment, not a lot of actual discussion. Do we really need to cover why it's the government's business because it's the people's business? Does the government often actually side with the people vs. corporate interests? Not often these days, but that's because people, against their self-interest, out of an immature sense that, "no one's gonna tell me what to do," keep voting for politician's who don't believe government should do anything. We saw how well that philosophy worked out under Bush after Katrina.

Protecting privacy against corporate invasion is at least as important as protecting it against government violation, especially as corporations gain more and more power. So, yes, the government's nose belongs in this business and the people deserve to have their liberty and privacy protected from corporate cyberstalkers. Unfortunately, until people start voting for politicians who believe that America is about liberty, and not just about making a buck any way possible, not much of substance is likely to change until some huge abuse of privacy turns into a scandal.

And, I'm almost certain that magicj is MacTripper.

Bah! "Men are not angels", so that applies equally to those in government and business. The difference is that when businesses are exposed for cheating customers, customers "fire" the business. When government is caught in a wrongdoing, who the hell knows who to complain to? Incompetence protects incompetence.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

Get the lowdown on the coming collapse:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45010

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

 

Get the lowdown on the coming collapse:  http://www.cbo.gov/publication/45010

Reply
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