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Apple to US Senate: We have no plans to ever track users' locations

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
At the company's second U.S. Senate hearing in weeks, Apple told senators that it does not, has never and has no plans to ever track users' locations.

Apple Vice President of Global Affairs Catherine Novelli testified before the Senate Consumer Protection, Safety and Insurance subcommittee on Thursday, along with representatives from Google and Facebook, MacNN reports. Titled "Consumer Privacy and Protection in the Mobile Marketplace," the hearing came on the heels of a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing that took place last week.

Apple largely held to its stance from the prior hearing. "Apple does not track users' locations -- Apple has never done so and has no plans to ever do so," Novelli said.

Senators have turned their attention to the issue of mobile privacy recently partly in response to a report from security researchers last month that claimed Apple was pervasively tracking users' locations in a database file in iOS 4. Apple issued a statement denying the claims, asserting instead that the database was a crowd-sourced collection of Wi-Fi hotspots and cell towers used to help the iPhone's location services operate more quickly and accurately.

At Thursday's hearing, Google maintained its position that the open nature of Google Android requires in a hands-off approach to third-party applications.

"Google does not and cannot control the behavior of third-party applications, or how they handle location information and other user information that the third-party application obtains from the device," said Google's director of public policy for the Americas, Alan Davidson. "Google does strongly encourage application developers to use best practices," which include providing a set privacy policy, avoiding logging, and presenting options for data control.

Senators voiced their concerns at the hearing, raising the question whether geotracking can ever be legitimate. "I think anyone who uses a mobile device has an expectation of privacy, and sadly that expectation is not always being met," Sen. John Rockefeller IV said during the hearing. Rockefeller also expressed his dissatisfaction with "totally unregulated" state of the app market. The possibility of a "do not track" list was also raised during the discussion.
post #2 of 34
So Apple will not track you, and police apps so that they cant use your tracking info without your permission. Google leave it open to devs to not track you by 'stongly suggesting' that they don't.

Google will have to re-think this attitude by the end of these hearings.

Apple should pass the details of offending app creators to the FBI for federal investigation. Maybe then they will find out why they are stealing user info.

Googles fanciful tales of Android being open have been recently debunked by evidence released in the skyhook trial which demonstrates Googles total control of the platform.

A wise man once said nothing in life is free.

You are foolish to believe otherwise.
post #3 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

So Apple will not track you, and police apps so that they cant use your tracking info without your permission. Google leave it open to devs to not track you by 'stongly suggesting' that they don't.

Google will have to re-think this attitude by the end of these hearings.

I have a feeling there is more to it than this one paragraph wrap up.

Poor magicj is going to have an aneurysm.
post #4 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

I have a feeling there is more to it than this one paragraph warp up.

Poor magicj is going to have an aneurysm.

He's been repeatedly saying AppleInsider has not been covering this 2nd hearing (and a possible conspiracy not to) so, expect him on this thread in 3.. 2.. 1..

Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

So Apple will not track you, and police apps so that they cant use your tracking info without your permission. Google leave it open to devs to not track you by 'stongly suggesting' that they don't.

Google will have to re-think this attitude by the end of these hearings.

Apple: "We're not going to track users"
Google: "We're open, so we don't give a shit"
post #5 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by justinnorth View Post

Every company provides the option to opt out of sharing the user data or behaviour targeting. Google or Apple are no exceptions, no company in the world can track you without your permission. But chances are there that you may have permitted the company to track as most of us never bother to read the privacy policy in details and just click I accept.

The best part is, Google is saying it doesn't know or care what apps track you once you give the app permission in that fabulous "Allow or Deny" Android screen.

post #6 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

So Apple will not track you, and [they will] police apps so that they cant use your tracking info without your permission. Google leave it open to devs to not track you by 'stongly suggesting' that they don't.

Google will have to re-think this attitude by the end of these hearings.

I would not give too much credence to the "[Apple will] police apps" There is only so much they can do . They had various rules in place, but still there was that issue that Pandora and others took access to a lot of data, a lot of which was not necessary.

What ever became of that issue?
post #7 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

The best part is, Google is saying it doesn't know or care what apps track you once you give the app permission in that fabulous "Allow or Deny" Android screen.


Aaaaaagh !

Is that a single 'Allow' for all of that or is that many Allows ?

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #8 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT View Post

Aaaaaagh !

Is that a single 'Allow' for all of that or is that many Allows ?

A single allow. If you want to use an app, if the app requires whatever permissions it wants, you either Allow or Deny the whole list. AFAIK.
post #9 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT View Post

Aaaaaagh !

Is that a single 'Allow' for all of that or is that many Allows ?

Your Location: iOS also asks for permission (at the time)
Contact Data: I've never used an app which pulls in contact data; does iOS ask?
Network Communication: iOS does not ask
You accounts: don't even know what this means
Storage: iOS does not ask (but the app is sandboxed - is this the case for Android?)
Read Phone state: iOS does not ask.
System Tools: iOS does not ask.

It would seem to me that android is telling you exactly what the app is going to do. Arguably, I think some permission are irrelevant, such as Network communication, but really, what is the beef here?
post #10 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"I think anyone who uses a mobile device has an expectation of privacy, and sadly that expectation is not always being met," Sen. John Rockefeller IV said during the hearing.

Really, I always assumed the opposite.

So you mean those movies are all make believe and the FBI isn't listening to any of my cel calls?
We know strangers around us don't listen to conversations either.
post #11 of 34
The interesting part is in two Senate meetings Google never answered the question about whether they tracked users. Their answer was the same in both. It deflected it by referring only to 3rd party apps and the openness of Andriod
post #12 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post


If every time I install the app I have to read that I'd kill myself.
post #13 of 34
Apple to US Senate: We have no plans to ever track users' locations, DO YOU?

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #14 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by PXT View Post

Apple to US Senate: We have no plans to ever track users' locations, DO YOU?

Yeah, really. That's what they should have said. What really gets me here is the questions and statements presented by these completely uninformed politicians.

Quote:
"I think anyone who uses a mobile device has an expectation of privacy, and sadly that expectation is not always being met," Sen. John Rockefeller IV said during the hearing. Rockefeller also expressed his dissatisfaction with "totally unregulated" state of the app market.

1. Then you're an idiot, sir, because no one should have any real expectation of privacy on a mobile device. Should Apple be tracking and logging your location? No. But it's not doing that.

2. The last bolded part really shows the disease that our government has. They need to have their hands in EVERYTHING. One of the reasons the "app" model is so successful is that the government had nothing to do with it. Can you imagine if the government sponsored smartphones? They'd cost $5,000 and have between 3 and 9 apps. Like Windows phone.
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post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

No, it doesn't. So any app can steal your contact data without you ever knowing. This is against Apple policy, but there are no technical safeguards in place to enforce that policy. Instead Apple relies on random audits or an App being reported by users.

It's not a random audit, an API scan is performed on every application, and if any address book API's show up Apple will not approve the application before the developer clarifies why the application needs address book access.

Quote:
As far as I know the penalty for getting caught stealing a user's contact data is Apple requires the App to stop doing it within 24 hours. No other action is taken. Importantly, the user is never informed their data was stolen.

What would you expect Apple to do, and how do you even think Apple would technically be able to 'inform users their data was stolen'. Also, I still don't get WTF you are doing here railing against Apple, while in reality, Android has much bigger privacy issues. Just because an application shows a list of weird privileges you have to allow/deny doesn't mean the user actually knows what the application will do with these privileges. Any application masking itself as a legit address book tool can upload everything it finds on your phone without the user knowing. That's supposing the user actually even reads and understands that screen. Maybe legally speaking it's enough to get Google off the hook but in terms of privacy protection it's a dud, no less than the privacy policies on iOS. Last but not least it has been shown multiple times that Android applications can get around the privilege query using exploits, which has happened on multiple occasions. What 'action' did Google take? Why are you not complaining on any Android blogs about the fact that probably a million times the amount of private data is sent from Android devices (it's Googles friggin business model) than from iOS ones?

Stop trolling this forum under the pretence you care about privacy, the only thing you care about is spamming this board with negative drivel about Apple's privacy policies, often with incorrect, one-sided or incomplete 'facts'.

Quote:
This is what I can gather from Apple's statements to Congress on the matter. But there is no published policy that I know of where Apple details exactly how it handles data theft.

Ah I was already wondering when the millionth reference to the 'Congresss Hearings' you seem to be inexplicably interested in would drop.

Why didn't you answer my direct question the last time: are you in any way affiliated with/working for/are enjoying benefits from any of the parties involved with this legal circus?

Before you give an honest answer to this question, we can all safely conclude you are some kind of shill, with a mission to spew negative BS about Apple here.
post #16 of 34
"I think anyone who uses a DEMOCRACY has an expectation of privacy, and sadly that expectation is not always being met,"

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

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post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Until that happens, I'll take the word of an Apple VP testifying before Congress over some guy on the internet any day of the week.

As will I, just like when any executive has continually stated that iOS does not, has not, and will not track you. An onboard file that requires root access is stored locally on your phone and never shared with anybody? The horror!

Quote:
I've answered that one several times. I'm a small Apple developer of iPhone/iPad apps. And when I complain about Apple's flaws in handling privacy, their 800+ fart apps, and their 3rd rate search features in all their stores, it's because it affects my business.

So who the <bleep> are you to keep trying to have these problems ignored so that I have to continuely face them? Asshat.

Please let me know which apps are yours. This way, I can make sure to never in my right mind purchase them if I am unfortunate enough to stumble across them. Any developer that reacts this way and name-calls a potential customer is just foolish, and deserves no money from us.

edit: the second quote didn't work originally.
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

No, it doesn't. So any app can steal your contact data without you ever knowing. This is against Apple policy, but there are no technical safeguards in place to enforce that policy. Instead Apple relies on random audits or an App being reported by users.

As far as I know the penalty for getting caught stealing a user's contact data is Apple requires the App to stop doing it within 24 hours. No other action is taken. Importantly, the user is never informed their data was stolen.

This is what I can gather from Apple's statements to Congress on the matter. But there is no published policy that I know of where Apple details exactly how it handles data theft.

That's incorrect. iOS does ask if the app uses your contact data. Example: Nuance's Dragon Dictation which improves my personal voice recognition spelling by reading the contact list. I ended up creating a contact record for my dog just so the speech recognition engine's accuracy improved.
post #19 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

I'm a small Apple developer of iPhone/iPad apps. And when I complain about Apple's flaws in handling privacy, their 800+ fart apps, and their 3rd rate search features in all their stores, it's because it affects my business.

Oh, I think I see the reason for all of your anger towards Apple. You blame them because your apps aren't doing well. Apple isn't going to hold your little hand and lead you to the promise land.
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

I'm only passing on what Bud Tribble said during Franken's hearing. If it's wrong, Apple can clear things up by publishing their policies for protecting contact data.

Until that happens, I'll take the word of an Apple VP testifying before Congress over some guy on the internet any day of the week.

I'd expect Apple to notify everyone who's purchased the app in question that their data may have been breached. They can certainly notify users when an app they purchased has an update for them. They can notify users about privacy issues.

Common sense, really.

I've answered that one several times. I'm a small Apple developer of iPhone/iPad apps. And when I complain about Apple's flaws in handling privacy, their 800+ fart apps, and their 3rd rate search features in all their stores, it's because it affects my business.

So who the <bleep> are you to keep trying to have these problems ignored so that I have to continuely face them? Asshat.

Ahhhhh, now I get it! You are one of the newly disenfranchised Fart app writers that are getting booted out of the App Store! No wonder you are so bitter, cynical and hateful. I'll bet you answered one of those ads "YOU TOO CAN MAKE MILLIONS WRITING FART APPS FOR THE APPLE APP STORE! TAKES MERE MINUTES A DAY! MAKES MILLIONS ENTERTAINING PEOPLE AND NEVER LEAVE YOUR BASEMENT! CALL NOW FOR FREE BROCHURE AND DEV KIT."

Apologies I didn't realize that you were one of <those> developers. However - I hear that Android is always looking some more apps, and they are seriously lacking fart apps! Just sayin'...
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post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by justinnorth View Post

Every company provides the option to opt out of sharing the user data or behaviour targeting. Google or Apple are no exceptions, no company in the world can track you without your permission.

Wow are you naive. Have you forgotten about recent automatic opt ins with Facebook, Google Buzz, and Pandora just for using the service or downloading an app?
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Apple's half-assed handling of user data isn't going to help small developers. Because now customers are wondering if I'm stealing their data. If Apple does their job and does it right, I'll sell more apps and Apple won't be getting dragged into hearings and courthouses every other day.

And I really don't want to hear Jobs talking about the importance of not having a lineup of junk for sale when he sticks developers in a lineup with over 800 fart apps.

And it's just ridiculous that I can go to some small company's web site and they've developed a better search engine (not using Google) than the 2nd largest company in the world can pull off.

The vast majority of Apple's payments to developers go to a few big fish. Now, of course, the small developer is partly responsible. It's hard to compete against companies with a lot of resources. But it's not impossible, and we really don't need Apple making the job harder for us. And we certainly don't need the apps to be hard to find, plopped in a pile of junk, and with the customer wondering how much data I'm going to steal from them if they get my app.

All I ask from Apple is they do a half way decent job on their side of things and I'll deal with being a small developer.

And your time spent on these forums must really be paying off too. Stop whining to random people on the internet and start spending more time trying to have a dialog with Apple and making better apps. Angry Birds, Tiny Wings, Doodlejump... these didn't start out as huge names or huge development studios. Those developers made them what they are. Stop making excuses for your inability to make a living on the App Store and leave us all alone.
post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

It's not a random audit, an API scan is performed on every application, and if any address book API's show up Apple will not approve the application before the developer clarifies why the application needs address book access.

Can you provide a reference for this? This would be great news as far as I'm concerned, if it's true.

Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

What would you expect Apple to do, and how do you even think Apple would technically be able to 'inform users their data was stolen'.

They should at least email owners of the particular app, which would be trivial. Why on earth do you think this would be difficult?! But I think they should go a step further: First offense by a particular company or developer: stern warning. Second offense: ban from the App Store. Apple has explicit policies in place that developers are thumbing their nose at. But honestly, Apple can take care of this just like they do with location, and they probably should.

Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

Also, I still don't get WTF you are doing here railing against Apple, while in reality, Android has much bigger privacy issues.

I guess I'd like to see magic's answer to this as well, but for me, I'm not going to spend any time/effort complaining about Android because I'm not a user of their products. And unless or until they would ever tighten down their own technology with regards to privacy issues, I never will be. So why should I give a shit what they're doing? They are so incredibly far from being a product I would use it's not even funny. Apple, on the other hand, is very good in general, with a few issues to work on around the edges. So I'm happy when these issues are being addressed, and I hope that Google gets completely bitch-slapped as part of the process. Can you imagine what would happen to Google's business model if all tracking and profiling were required to be "opt-in"??

Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

Stop trolling this forum under the pretence you care about privacy, the only thing you care about is spamming this board with negative drivel about Apple's privacy policies, often with incorrect, one-sided or incomplete 'facts'.

Really? I haven't seen anything to date that he's posted that was incorrect. Perhaps it didn't align with your personal view of the world, but that's quite different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

Why didn't you answer my direct question the last time: are you in any way affiliated with/working for/are enjoying benefits from any of the parties involved with this legal circus? Before you give an honest answer to this question, we can all safely conclude you are some kind of shill, with a mission to spew negative BS about Apple here.

What about you? Why do you continually come in here and rail against someone who is making good conversation about privacy issues? I might as well accuse you of working in the advertising/profiling industry. Or for Apple. WTF?

What is your interest in shutting down conversations about privacy issues, and why are you so adamant about it?!
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post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by justinnorth View Post

Every company provides the option to opt out of sharing the user data or behaviour targeting. Google or Apple are no exceptions, no company in the world can track you without your permission. But chances are there that you may have permitted the company to track as most of us never bother to read the privacy policy in details and just click I accept.

So you don't think there are companies that track you even after you've opted out? Or companies that let you opt out of some tracking, but track you in other ways regardless of your preferences? do you really know all the ways Google is collecting your information, and all the ways they shovel it out to advertisers?
post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

Please let me know which apps are yours. This way, I can make sure to never in my right mind purchase them if I am unfortunate enough to stumble across them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotWake View Post

Oh, I think I see the reason for all of your anger towards Apple. You blame them because your apps aren't doing well. Apple isn't going to hold your little hand and lead you to the promise land.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post

Ahhhhh, now I get it! You are one of the newly disenfranchised Fart app writers that are getting booted out of the App Store! No wonder you are so bitter, cynical and hateful. I'll bet you answered one of those ads "YOU TOO CAN MAKE MILLIONS WRITING FART APPS FOR THE APPLE APP STORE! TAKES MERE MINUTES A DAY! MAKES MILLIONS ENTERTAINING PEOPLE AND NEVER LEAVE YOUR BASEMENT! CALL NOW FOR FREE BROCHURE AND DEV KIT."

Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

Stop making excuses for your inability to make a living on the App Store and leave us all alone.

You guys all get up on the wrong side of the bed again? What a bunch of assholes.

A developer wants to clean up some minor privacy concerns on his platform of choice and the maggots come crawling out of the woodwork.
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post #26 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

Thank you, AI, for posting this article. Now if we can only get Apple to post it's policy regarding data theft...

The entire hearing is available here: http://www.c-span.org/Events/Congres...y/10737421634/

And what exactly is Google's policy for data theft? What is any company's policy for data theft? Those companies that have had data stolen still have no stated policy for data theft. Troll on as you will, but at least find a new topic occasionally.
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

So you don't think there are companies that track you even after you've opted out? Or companies that let you opt out of some tracking, but track you in other ways regardless of your preferences? do you really know all the ways Google is collecting your information, and all the ways they shovel it out to advertisers?

Absolutely right, elroth. At least a handful of people here are paying attention.

Opt-out cookies are complete bullshit. You are still totally being profiled, and depending on your usage models, more accurately than if you just turned cookies off. The only thing it means is that the advertisers won't give you ads that are specifically tailored to you. Kind of the worst of all worlds.
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post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

I've answered that one several times. I'm a small Apple developer of iPhone/iPad apps. And when I complain about Apple's flaws in handling privacy, their 800+ fart apps, and their 3rd rate search features in all their stores, it's because it affects my business.

So who the <bleep> are you to keep trying to have these problems ignored so that I have to continuely face them? Asshat.

Apple currently has fewer than 200 fart apps, and has made it clear that they're not accepting any more. You've repeated this lie before. Maybe shouldn't do that before calling other people "asshats."
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post #29 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDW2001 View Post

... 1. Then you're an idiot, sir, because no one should have any real expectation of privacy on a mobile device. ...

I don't think the person you are referring to is the idiot. Most people in fact do, and everyone ought to be able to, have an expectation of privacy on a mobile device, in their email, and in using the internet and telecommunications services generally. Just as they do and ought to have an expectation of privacy when using a land-line, or sending communications via the USPS. These latter are examples of area where traditionally and rightly people have an expectation of privacy. People ought to be able to have the same expectations of privacy using modern methods of communication. We ought not be expected to give up our privacy, and thus our liberty, just because technology advances. The right to privacy, from both the invasiveness of governments and corporations, is fundamental to liberty: without privacy, there is no liberty.
post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

You guys all get up on the wrong side of the bed again? What a bunch of assholes.

A developer wants to clean up some minor privacy concerns on his platform of choice and the maggots come crawling out of the woodwork.

I have no issue with Apple cleaning up anything that is not perfect. That will always be an eternal struggle. I have a problem with a developer coming on here and calling his potential customers names, questioning their intelligence, and getting upset when they don't agree with his views 100%.
post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

I have no issue with Apple cleaning up anything that is not perfect. That will always be an eternal struggle. I have a problem with a developer coming on here and calling his potential customers names, questioning their intelligence, and getting upset when they don't agree with his views 100%.

You must be reading posts from a different magicj then, because as far as I can tell, they exhibit none of those characteristics. I haven't gone and following him/her around the forum but in relation to this thread, your comment makes no sense.
post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by hittrj01 View Post

I have no issue with Apple cleaning up anything that is not perfect. That will always be an eternal struggle. I have a problem with a developer coming on here and calling his potential customers names, questioning their intelligence, and getting upset when they don't agree with his views 100%.

I've read pretty much all the posts on all the threads related to any privacy issues, and that's not what I've seen.

Quite the contrary, in fact. I've seen a guy (presumably a guy) who has been thoughtful and measured in his posts. I don't think we need to agree with all the details of his posts to agree that he has generally been polite. On the other hand, others seem to enjoy insulting him without really addressing the issues in a meaningful way, other than "well I don't care about it, so why should anyone else care?"

And the one bad word I saw here was in response to d-range, who called him a "shill", and accused him of "enjoying benefits from any of the parties involved with this legal circus".

Magic explained his interest, but I don't recall seeing d-range explain why we should believe he's not a shill for the advertising industry or somehow enjoying benefits from the other side.

It doesn't take a lot to see this, my post above was just a handful of insults taken from just this one thread.
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post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Quite the contrary, in fact. I've seen a guy (presumably a guy) who has been thoughtful and measured in his posts. I don't think we need to agree with all the details of his posts to agree that he has generally been polite. On the other hand, others seem to enjoy insulting him without really addressing the issues in a meaningful way, other than "well I don't care about it, so why should anyone else care?"

This 1-2 tag team of you and magicj is getting comical. I'm not going to continue hypothesizing why you are both so eager to keep coming back in these discussions to back each other up, but to me, there is something stinking here.

Just let me leave it here with the remark that you can keep pretending you and magicj are actually debating privacy issues here all you want, and the people who reply to you don't care about it, but it still doesn't make sense. I've said multiple times that Apple messed up the location cache thing and should have done a better job there, because they have introduced a (very minor, very hypothetical) privacy issue, which already has been fixed. That's all there is to it. Repeating made-up stuff enough times so no-one visiting this site can get around it, doesn't make it true. You asked why I was so adamant about trying to sort out the nonsense magicj writes (which you are continually trying to back up), well that's the reason: because he is posted one-sided, convoluted drivel, selectively picking and choosing random quotes from the 'Congress Hearings' he seems inexplicably interested in (as if those are going to have any effect on his privacy), and repeating those ad nauseam.

I do care about genuine privacy issues by the way, which is why this whole discussion about nothing here kind of aggrevates me, it only detracts from the millions of ways governments try to invade your privacy 'to fight the terrorists' or to 'find the pedophiles' and that kind of BS. If you or magicj really, sincerely care about privacy, you should be ashamed of yourselves, making such a big deal about this stupid location cache thing, the whole legal circus around it, or the illusion that anything stored or sent to/from on a cell phone can and should be air-tight, and that the government is there to make it happen and help you guard your privacy. Childiss naivete.
post #34 of 34
Quote:
Apple does not track users' locations -- Apple has never done so and has no plans to ever do so," Novelli said.

Now that they've built all the Apple Stores in the places people frequent the most, they don't need the data any more.

Quote:
"I think anyone who uses a mobile device has an expectation of privacy, and sadly that expectation is not always being met," Sen. John Rockefeller IV said during the hearing. Rockefeller also expressed his dissatisfaction with "totally unregulated" state of the app market. The possibility of a "do not track" list was also raised during the discussion.

This could become a really big problem for app stores that aren't quarantined. No other device that people own can offer such a breach of privacy on such a large scale. Harvesting contacts is more important and should be fully protected at all times. I'm not sure how much abuse if any could be caused with location tracking. Possibly the movements of celebrities if they tie the data to the contact names but protecting the contacts would be the first step.
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