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Microsoft's Ballmer: Next-gen Windows systems coming next year

post #1 of 64
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Speaking at a developer forum in Tokyo, Japan on Monday, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer confirmed plans for a 2012 launch of the "next generation of Windows systems," which will include Windows 8 slates and tablets.

During the keynote, Ballmer publicly used the name "Windows 8" for the first time. While touting advances made in Windows 7, Ballmer noted, "There's a whole lot more coming."

"As we progress through the year, you ought to expect to hear a lot about Windows 8. Windows 8 slates, tablets, PCs, a variety of different form factors" he said.

Microsoft announced in January that it plans to port Windows 8 to the ARM system-on-a-chip architecture in order to compete with devices like Apple's iPad. "Windows PCs will continue to adapt and evolve. Windows will be everywhere on every device without compromise," said Ballmer at the Consumer Electronics Show.

Early builds of Windows 8 hint at a scalable cross-platform solution that could make its way into tablets and phones. Microsoft has struggled in the mobile market, partly due to Intel's unsuccessful efforts to meet low power requirements with its line of Atom chips.

Source: Within Windows

Ballmer admitted on Monday that the company's "big sort of effort" to transform communication with Windows Phone had arrived late. "We came to market with Windows Phone about a year later than I wish we had, shame on us. But, we're moving forward very actively," said Ballmer. The company is set to launch a major upgrade to Windows Phone on Tuesday.

He also noted during his remarks that the 18 months since his last trip to Japan were the "longest period of time between visits in Japan." According to Ballmer, Japan is Microsoft's second-largest subsidiary in the world. This year, the Redmond, Wash., corporation celebrates 25 years of being in business there.

For its part, Apple will unveil the future of Mac OS at the Worldwide Developers Conference early next month. Mac OS X 10.7 Lion brings several major features from iOS back to the Mac and is due out this summer.

post #2 of 64
Hmmmm. Given past performance, I am inclined to say this is hope, not expectation.
post #3 of 64
Does it involve that stunningly creepy login screen?
post #4 of 64
"We're gonna kick butt...in the future': This has been Steve Balmer's mantra for the past five or so years.

However, it seems to be working on the shareholders, as he still holds a job after failing to perform in so many areas for such a long time.

Does 'next generation' mean 'as good as Apple'?
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post #5 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Hmmmm. Given past performance, I am inclined to say this is hope, not expectation.

I can’t say MS is a well oiled machine but they certainly seem more efficient than they have in the past. WP7 isn’t a copy of Apple. Kinect was smart purchase. IE9 has been a huge catch up to modern web browsing. The only recent move I question from MS is their Skype purchase.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jpellino View Post

Does it involve that stunningly creepy login screen?

That is very creepy.

The new login screen and unlock screens in Lion are very nice.
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post #6 of 64
Quote:
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer revealed plans to release the "next generation of Windows systems," which will include Windows 8 slates and tablets, next year.

Microsoft is building computers?
post #7 of 64
Is it just me, or does anyone else think that having to hold the same ctrl-alt-delete keys that are used to force quit, end tasks etc are still being used after 20 plus years. It just seems that Microsoft can not break away from the past. Couldn't they just use the "Windows" key to log in?
post #8 of 64
You know there was a day when an announcement like this struck fear into the hearts of Microsoft's would be competitors. Not anymore...
post #9 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The only recent move I question from MS is their Skype purchase.

Actually, that may have been one of their smarter moves. Not as much of an overpayment as some might think.

(Happy to explain the financial logic in PM. Don't want to bore the general readership.)
post #10 of 64
He also said they'll be 500 (FIVE HUNDRED) new FEATURES in Windows Phone 7.

500???
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post #11 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmikeo View Post

Is it just me, or does anyone else think that having to hold the same ctrl-alt-delete keys that are used to force quit, end tasks etc are still being used after 20 plus years. It just seems that Microsoft can not break away from the past. Couldn't they just use the "Windows" key to log in?

This x 1,000,000

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post #12 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmikeo View Post

Is it just me, or does anyone else think that having to hold the same ctrl-alt-delete keys that are used to force quit, end tasks etc are still being used after 20 plus years. It just seems that Microsoft can not break away from the past. Couldn't they just use the "Windows" key to log in?

No way. Nothing says kludge like having to press Ctrl-Alt-Del to login to a Windows Slablet.

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post #13 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"Windows will be everywhere on every device without compromise,"

So it really isn't enough for Microsoft to be successful, they need a full-on, no-competition monopoly?
post #14 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

Microsoft is building computers?

Well, yes. Just the kind with a curated software library, consumer-oriented focus, and no Adobe Flash:


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post #15 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

You know there was a day when an announcement like this struck fear into the hearts of Microsoft's would be competitors. Not anymore...

I was struck by mirth.
Ballmer probably thought, "You know, copying Apple has worked for us in the past. Maybe we should do it again because if that doesn't work, I don't have a Plan B."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #16 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Microsoft announced in January that it plans to port Windows 8 to the ARM system-on-a-chip architecture in order to compete with devices like Apple's iPad. "Windows PCs will continue to adapt and evolve. Windows will be everywhere on every device without compromise," said Ballmer at the Consumer Electronics Show.

Early builds of Windows 8 hint at a scalable cross-platform solution that could make its way into tablets and phones. Microsoft has struggled in the mobile market, partly due to Intel's unsuccessful efforts to meet low power requirements with its line of Atom chips.

One thing's for sure, MS isn't copying Apple's architectural finesse: Apple has been doing OS X for its desktop/laptop systems for ten years, improving at every release, and sometimes drawing a line in the sand stating "OS X 10.x and upward will no longer support y" (y being PPC, etc). MS in its infinite wisdom, and mostly because MS doesn't manufacture hardware boxes and is somewhat beholden to the h/w guys, has an OS that has become spaghetti code that still supports VGA, 5.25" floppies, serial & parallel ports, SCSI ports, etc.

Then along came Apple with its iPhone, then the iPod Touch, and now the iPad. An OS designed to power these small designs with intentionally limited use. An OS designed to be a power miser and that cuts the mouse cord. And following in its pattern of monolithic software bases, MS has tried for years to shoehorn Windows into PDAs and other stuff under the banner of WinCE, and now it announces that it plans to port (i.e. shoehorn) Windows 8 into tablets and phones.

MS seems to be doing things bass-ackwards and not learning that you simply can't take a desktop mouse-based OS and shoehorn it into smaller quarters, with probably 70% of the code atrophied and uselessly standing by.
post #17 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"As we progress through the year, you ought to expect to hear a lot about Windows 8. Windows 8 slates, tablets, PCs, a variety of different form factors" he said.

Not just slates, not just tablets, but slates and tablets.
post #18 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpellino View Post

Does it involve that stunningly creepy login screen?

What exactly is creepy about it? I'm at a loss. It's not great, but creepy? Interesting choice of words. lol
post #19 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecphorizer View Post

One thing's for sure, MS isn't copying Apple's architectural finesse: Apple has been doing OS X for its desktop/laptop systems for ten years, improving at every release, and sometimes drawing a line in the sand stating "OS X 10.x and upward will no longer support y" (y being PPC, etc). MS in its infinite wisdom, and mostly because MS doesn't manufacture hardware boxes and is somewhat beholden to the h/w guys, has an OS that has become spaghetti code that still supports VGA, 5.25" floppies, serial & parallel ports, SCSI ports, etc.

Then along came Apple with its iPhone, then the iPod Touch, and now the iPad. An OS designed to power these small designs with intentionally limited use. An OS designed to be a power miser and that cuts the mouse cord. And following in its pattern of monolithic software bases, MS has tried for years to shoehorn Windows into PDAs and other stuff under the banner of WinCE, and now it announces that it plans to port (i.e. shoehorn) Windows 8 into tablets and phones.

MS seems to be doing things bass-ackwards and not learning that you simply can't take a desktop mouse-based OS and shoehorn it into smaller quarters, with probably 70% of the code atrophied and uselessly standing by.

Isn't MS doing the thing that Apple did with iOS? Apple derived iOS from OS X (Darwin & XNU kernel). Now, Microsoft is doing the same thing and deriving the NT subsystems for ARM. Anything that's not suitable for tablet touchscreen are removed. The UI is rewritten from scratch for touchscreen usage, like iOS. The ARM version of Windows 8 doesn't run any of the legacy Windows apps, but it'll use the new app model (called appx) that's portable for ARM and x86.
post #20 of 64
Problem with MS, Ballmer, and Windows is that they don't have a consistent record on anything. Their OS is all over the board, and has major design changes with every release. This is problematic, as you constantly have a variety of strains of Windows across the spectrum, and they all have their inherent problems. Whereas Apple builds and improves upon the same platform over and over again which is great for increased stability and familiarity with every release for the end user. My company still uses XP due to being afraid of upgrading to anything else, and the performance is simply horrible....just horrible. We are looking to replace Blackberry with the iPhone though. Maybe this will lead to Apple laptops in the future. I can't imagine what we spend on tech support for these HP POS.

As far as the Windows phone, well, what a disaster. And I guess MS doesn't get it when it comes to the tablet industry, as it must have a subculture of apps/developers to compete. Coming to the party a couple years late sounds futile.

Not sure why shareholders keep Ballmer in place. He's taken the MS name from a market leader to just a ho hum, we'll believe it when we see it stereotype. He's also a pretty abysmal figurehead for Microsoft from a variety of perspectives.
post #21 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by hypoluxa View Post

What exactly is creepy about it? I'm at a loss. It's not great, but creepy? Interesting choice of words. lol

Fine, not creepy. How about "stunningly hideous?"
post #22 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinney View Post

Not just slates, not just tablets, but slates and tablets.

What the fuck is a slate?!
Hmmmmmm...
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Hmmmmmm...
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post #23 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinN206 View Post

Isn't MS doing the thing that Apple did with iOS? Apple derived iOS from OS X (Darwin & XNU kernel). Now, Microsoft is doing the same thing and deriving the NT subsystems for ARM. Anything that's not suitable for tablet touchscreen are removed. The UI is rewritten from scratch for touchscreen usage, like iOS. The ARM version of Windows 8 doesn't run any of the legacy Windows apps, but it'll use the new app model (called appx) that's portable for ARM and x86.

Maybe sort of, although we don't really have much information yet as to what, exactly, Windows 8 Tablet Edition (or whatever they end up calling it) will entail.

But MS also already has a mobile OS, WP 7, which carries forward some of the conventions of their other, cancelled mobile OS, Zune. Which means you'll be choosing among Windows, Windows Tablet, and WP 7, none of which are compatible.

If MS weren't so enslaved by the Windows brand, they would have actually done what Apple did and make the hard choices to create a phone/tablet friendly version of the NT code base, which they then would have called something other than Windows to avoid consumer confusion.

Instead, they're going to be running a version of "Windows" that isn't, at least in the the way people expect when they see the name. What's the point of that? Just to say that they got "Windows" running well on a touch device? And where does that leave WP 7? Apparently in an artificial phone ghetto that MS made up to defend their core business-- which is the exactly the kind of thing that has made them a shadow of their former selves.
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post #24 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpellino View Post

Does it involve that stunningly creepy login screen?

If I'm not mistaken that little guy is from the Windows 7 charactrers theme. I'm guessing this just means they are allowing the user to customize the wallpaper on the logon screen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by djmikeo View Post

Is it just me, or does anyone else think that having to hold the same ctrl-alt-delete keys that are used to force quit, end tasks etc are still being used after 20 plus years. It just seems that Microsoft can not break away from the past. Couldn't they just use the "Windows" key to log in?

Just one of the many examples of legacy and enterprise support that hold Microsoft back.

If Microsoft change something (even as simple as how to logon) then they risk pissing off their business customers. If they don't change they look stale to normal consumers.

However if the pattern logon screen is anything to go by they might be willing to strain the business relationship.
post #25 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

What the fuck is a slate?!

My guess is the Windows Slate will run a version of the Windows Phone OS modified for a larger screen whilst the Windows Tablet will run the full Windows 8 operating system.
post #26 of 64
So I can get Microsoft Windows for ARM but it cannot run programs designed for Microsoft Windows.


Hrm...What could go wrong?
post #27 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

My guess is the Windows Slate will run a version of the Windows Phone OS modified for a larger screen whilst the Windows Tablet will run the full Windows 8 operating system.

Maybe, but I don't think so. I made a some predictions a few months ago that I'm sticking to

I think they will eventually get rid of the WP7 codebase. Maybe by WP8, maybe WP9. It's based on WinCE which is pretty messy stuff compared to the modular nature of Windows 7/8.

The OS change should be transparent to the user though as applications are written to Dot Net, not to a specific OS or architecture.
  • Win Phone 8/9 - ARM/x86. All applications written to Silverlight/XNA.
  • Win Tab 8/ARM - Metro UI. Only supports Silverlight/XNA via Marketplace (although Office will have to be ARM native).
  • Win Tab 8/x86 - Dual UI. Standard Windows and Metro. Legacy as well as Silverlight/XNA support. Dock-able.
  • Win 8 - Standard Windows UI. Legacy as well as Silverlight/XNA support.
  • Xbox Next - I'm not sure. Support for Silverlight and the Marketplace has been rumored.
post #28 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

So I can get Microsoft Windows for ARM but it cannot run programs designed for Microsoft Windows. Hrm...What could go wrong?

My guess if we will never see standard desktop Windows running on an ARM processor. At least, not in retail available to normal consumers.

You've highlighted a long-running issue with Microsoft's product naming though. Basically, it sucks.

Why Microsoft called their new phone "Windows Phone" is beyond me. The only exposure a lot (most?) people have of Windows is at their work on a locked down version of a decade old OS on crappy underpowered hardware with enough bloat to sink the titanic.

That experience is not something any sane person would want on their phone.
post #29 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Well, yes. Just the kind with a curated software library, consumer-oriented focus, and no Adobe Flash:



What I find ironic is that the XBox came out first between the Wii and the PS3, yet it's about to be surpassed by the PS3 and its nowhere near as popular as the Wii.
post #30 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

So I can get Microsoft Windows for ARM but it cannot run programs designed for Microsoft Windows.


Hrm...What could go wrong?

This:

Windows CE. It ran on ARM. It was optimized for keyboard-less touch screens and low-memory hardware. And it could not run programs designed for Microsoft Windows.

Think about it. Microsoft has been down the ARM road. What's different this time? That they're porting their legacy Windows code base to ARM? That it's going to be called "Windows 8" instead of "Windows That's Not Compatible with Real Windows 8"? At some point, Microsoft is going to wake up to the fact that they're just repainting the Titanic.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #31 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by hypoluxa View Post

What exactly is creepy about it? I'm at a loss. It's not great, but creepy? Interesting choice of words. lol

You don't find being told to press Ctrl-Alt-Delete creepy? Gives me the chills every time

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John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #32 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

i especially liked the flying turtle one.

He forgot the elephants
post #33 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

What I find ironic is that the XBox came out first between the Wii and the PS3, yet it's about to be surpassed by the PS3 and its nowhere near as popular as the Wii.

I don't know about saying "about to be". I suppose it depends on your definition of "about to be". At current sales rates it should happen in 18-24 months.

That's 8 years after the release of the X360 and will probably be after the release of the next generation Xbox.

In any case. How is it ironic?

Sales (millions) and market share from last gen:
Nintendo: 21.75 / 11%
Sony: 143.07 / 76%
Microsoft: 24.65 / 13%

Sales (millions) and market share so far from this gen:
Nintendo: 86.40 / 45%
Sony: 50.38 / 26%
Microsoft: 53.76 / 28%

Relative market share change:
Nintendo: +395%
Sony: -286%
Microsoft: +217%
post #34 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

What the fuck is a slate?!

You've never seen The Flintstones?
post #35 of 64
Operating System Market Share
Windows XP\t 53.18%
Windows 7\t 25.11%
Windows Vista\t 10.22%

http://marketshare.hitslink.com/oper....aspx?qprid=10

Scary that XP's market share is still so high.
post #36 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

That it's going to be called "Windows 8" instead of "Windows That's Not Compatible with Real Windows 8"?

Isn't that the entire point of "post pc"? Your digital life changes from being PC-centric to cloud-centric and you have a bunch of different devices that have had the user experience tailored to the form factor that can access your data?

Isn't that what we all want?

As long as there is code-compatibility across devices developers will be happy, and as long as you create a mesh of devices tied together through baked in access to cloud services then consumers will be happy.

Having access to the same applications across all devices is the "old" way of thinking.

Having access to the same data across all devices is the "new" way.


Quote:
Originally Posted by macadam212 View Post

Operating System Market Share
Windows XP\t 53.18%
Windows 7\t 25.11%
Windows Vista\t 10.22%

http://marketshare.hitslink.com/oper....aspx?qprid=10

Scary that XP's market share is still so high.

Microsoft have a problem that Apple seem to have avoided in that people don't tend to upgrade the OS.

I'd put money on a majority of that 25% Windows 7 market share being new PC's that were purchased in the last 18 months.
post #37 of 64
creepy

frigging

graphic.


WTF Microsoft? "Ugly is the new beautiful"?
post #38 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

According to Ballmer, Japan is Microsoft's second-largest subsidiary in the world.

So now the entire country of Japan is a subsidiary of Microsoft!? Goodness! They've come a long way!
post #39 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

I'd put money on a majority of that 25% Windows 7 market share being new PC's that were purchased in the last 18 months.

I think a lot of people who got stuck with Windows Vista upgraded to Windows 7. IMO Vista was so bad that they should have offered free upgrade from Vista to Win 7.
post #40 of 64
We have many customers that run XP as the main OS. They have older software packages which run fine on XP. We have been shipping new HP systems to them and putting XP on them even though their software will work fine on 7.

They are happy with XP and the performance they get. We just stuck in a new hardware firewall and upgraded their security suite and they are pleased as punch.

Other clients have a majority of XP machines which will be upgraded over time to windows 7 when they are cycled out for new hardware but no one is in a rush to spend too much on hardware at this time
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