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US Sen. Franken calls on Apple, Google to require app privacy policies - Page 2

post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbsteph View Post

Does your grocery store have a "discount" card? Does your retailer ask for a phone number when you purchase with cash?

Don't tell me you actually give them your phone number?! That's none of their f#$@!g business! Neither is your name, address or shopping habits. The fact that so many people give this out at the checkstands willingly for no good reason is so stupid it's embarrassing. :-(
No Matte == No Sale :-(
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No Matte == No Sale :-(
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post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Freedom isn't free, and neither is privacy.

If you want your privacy, take care with how you use the Internet and other networks.

If you don't study, you're a crappy voter.
If you don't mind your privacy, no one will mind it for you.

Google didn't invent databases. Echelon predates the Internet.

We are each responsible for our own freedom, and our own privacy. Both require diligence and effort.

So right!!!!!!!!
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by redbarchetta View Post

Because they are, by far, the biggest ones, perhaps? You know, the ones that more than 90% of all mobile app sales go through?

I'm amazed at the opposition here--this can only be good for consumers. There are literally no downsides for us. Now if you're Apple or Google (which I swear to god some of you think you are), then you have a right to be slightly worried as it requires further transparency in exactly how user's data is being used and shared.

It's a waste because no one READS the privacy policy. I don't care what the policy says. Rather than putting a privacy policy into the app that no one would read, the privacy policy should be stated on the product page in the store. And the app should warn when it's doing something with my info.
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxhunter101 View Post

So right!!!!!!!!

He didn't actually say anything that had any meaning.
post #45 of 49
[QUOTE=ktappe;1869845]... If he is so concerned about privacy that he starts attacking Apple and Google...

Seemed more like a request to me. Sure, this request only went to A & G, and maybe it isn't completely thought through from all technical angles, but I think this makes a "reasonable" first step. Is it the best way to go? Maybe not. But it isnt an attack...
post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

And, under Apple's current practices, you never will see any evidence, as their practice is to not inform anyone when such theft occurs.

Nice bit of circular reasoning, MacTripper.
post #47 of 49
The primary problem here is that the solution that the good Senator from Minnesota is asking for is no solution at all. I think it has been clearly demonstrated that policy statements for all intents and purposes aren't read by the average user, and usually contain clauses that indemnify the issuer. In short they are proven ineffective and are classic routes to claim the moral highground for legislation - without producing sensible or effective controls. You cannot mandate or legislate commonsense. Human nature moves the same way rivers move. You try to control a river and it will demonstrate to you that you are in error - just ask the Army Corps of Engineers. You can provide for slight course alternations but nothing more. But our elected "representatives" cannot admit to that.

This whole thing is the result of a pissing contest between two committees: Franken's Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law , Representative Fred Upton's House committee on Energy and Commerce, and competition from the Interagency Subcommittee on Privacy & Internet Policy. All three are looking at and proposing privacy controls and rushing to beat their counterparts to legislation. Which means we will get crap for legislation ultimately that (if we are lucky - history indicates we aren't) will be implemented badly and need to be revised in a couple of years.

Nothing good comes out of legislative wrangling - and there's a whole lot of wrangling over this issue.
If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesmall View Post

Agreed. The best outcome would be for Senator Franken to resign and just go away. He's a jerk and he puts a face on the term 'bozo.'

Amen! The same people who voted for Mr. Franken are the same dolts who think that the Daily Show is a news program! Al Franken = brain dead comedian. Always was. Always will be. Why would any one vote for someone who spent their entire life being paid to be obnoxious? Wait! Now I get it! Politics IS the next logical path for washed up comedians! My bad!
post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicj View Post

In his letter to Apple and Google, Senator Fraken asked that the policy be written in language that is easy to understand for the average user.

It always pays to read the original source material first hand, rather than relying solely on press releases.

understood it very well, but thank-you for what i will assume is well-intentioned guidance. In fact I have been following this from the start, well before any of this broke in the media. I asked for and saw a couple of drafts of what was going to be pursued in committee for all three committees. That being said, the request for an average consumer understandable privacy policy is nothing but political posturing with Senator Franken knowing very well that his request cannot be complied with in any reasonable fashion, that does not in some way create a conflict of interest for the developers. Not so much the collection and use of the "private" data, but the fact that such policies have very specific legal ramifications that require the use of specific legal terms. You think agreements and policy statements are long-winded now, just imagine having to state in accurate legalese the privacy policy and then Very carefully and plainly spell out what each term means and its potential nuances under different circumstances.

That being said I do love the fact that you managed to misspell the Senator's name as Fraken.
If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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