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Latest 'MAC Defender' malware attacks Mac OS X without password - Page 3

post #81 of 94
1 quick little OSX update turning off "open safe files" and locking it off until this security problem is fixed would work fine.
post #82 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

What have to clean Google, or Bing, or Yahoo. All of three can be cheated by SEO techniques.

You don't have to bother cleaning up Bing. When Google is cleaned up, Bing will follow automatically!
post #83 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

1 quick little OSX update turning off "open safe files" and locking it off until this security problem is fixed would work fine.

Oh, yeah. That's what we should do. Don't actually fix the problem, just circumvent it...

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #84 of 94
I concur.
post #85 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ernstcs View Post

I've always hated and never understood why the option existed in Safari to automatically 'Open "Safe" files after downloading'. I don't think Safari really knows what's SAFE and what's not. Bad Apple!

I concur.
post #86 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by ernstcs View Post

I've always hated and never understood why the option existed in Safari to automatically 'Open "Safe" files after downloading'. I don't think Safari really knows what's SAFE and what's not. Bad Apple!

Apparently Apple thinks that people are so stupid, or that Mac OS X is so badly designed that, after initiating a download, which makes the download window to pop-up letting you see what are your options, no one or very few will think to click "reveal in Finder" on that window.

Apple really is shooting its own foot with this one; there is no such thing as "safe file" before you open it and inspect it. It is absolutely ridiculous to categorize files downloaded from internet like that based on file type and letting a piece of software to handle them blindly.
post #87 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by PB View Post

Apple really is shooting its own foot with this one; there is no such thing as "safe file" before you open it and inspect it. It is absolutely ridiculous to categorize files downloaded from internet like that based on file type and letting a piece of software to handle them blindly.

Can malware be stored inside PNGs (other image formats, et. al.) that activate when opened in Preview?

Legitimate question.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone] exists, it doesn’t deserve to.
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post #88 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Can malware be stored inside PNGs (other image formats, et. al.) that activate when opened in Preview?

Legitimate question.

Yes and it happened years ago as a proof of concept with an mp3 file. This was one of the reasons that pushed Apple to update Mac OS X so that it warns the user when something (s)he tries to open, usually downloaded from internet, contains executable and potentially malicious code. I don't know if it is easy or not to bypass this kind of protection.

However, the open "safe files" option is still there in Safari activated by default. This is beyond logic today.
post #89 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by focher View Post

The next time someone drives a Volvo into a brick wall and dies, you will be that moron on the Volvo Insider forum blaming Volvo because they market their cars as safer than others. Your argument being mostly thatthe marketiing claim leads some people to believe that safer equates with invincibility.

If Volvo said "Our cars will protect you from all kinds of crashes. You wreck in one of our cars, you will be safe, and you will live, even if you intentionally drive your car into a wall." then yes, I would be that moron. However, Volvo does not state that. Apple, in their ads, in the way they state things claiming to be so secure, has said that. Yes, they have the "No computer is fully safe 100%", and "Does not catch Windows Viruses." both of these things are true. But its the fact they keep portraying that you can't be harmed on a Mac, that is the issue here. In court, Apple would definitely win as their verbiage is "right" enough, but in the eyes of a general consumer, its confusing enough to lull them into a false sense of security.

Bottom line: People downloaded the software, it caused havoc on their computer, even though its their fault, Mac OS X is not as secure as advertised. If it were, then this attack wouldn't be an issue, and I would be genuinely impressed.
Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
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Go Linux, Choose a Flavor!
"I aim to misbehave"
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post #90 of 94
bitWrangler:
It sure as heck is a Trojan. The simple meaning of Trojan (just like the old Greek story) is "something very bad that is disguised as something good".

camroidv27:
No one I know of has ever said "there is no malware written for their computers". If anyone said this, they are a lone voice of ignorance. What is commonly said is "there is no virus written for OS X', and that still holds. A virus must do two things: attach itself to some system file(s), and replicate itself. Nothing of that sort has ever been discovered in the wild for OS X.

The real idiocy is with Apple who have removed the protection for system folders (such as /Applications). In the early days of OS X, you (nor any malware) could add any file to or remove any file from /Applications. I'm not saying it was an easy attribute to live with, but it was effective. A reasonable solution could have been devised, but Apple chose instead to throw out the baby with the bath water and open the /Applications folder (and home folder prefs login items) to all manner of junk. It is amazing to me that this is the first super-malware scare for Apple. These Russian thieves have been asleep at the switch.
post #91 of 94
camroidv27:
Two more glaring errors on your part.
(1) "Because that's what Apple said." You are making things up. Where do you read on Apple's site that 'clicking okay can't harm you'????
(2) "What I don't get, is why people are downloading an AV program for an OS that touts it not needing one." People are NOT downloading this Trojan. It downloads itself by Javascript. The OS does not tout that no anti-virus software is needed. Apple's site suggests using anti-virus software.

Time to get off the anti-Apple bandwagon and go back to your Vista.
post #92 of 94
[B]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ai666 View Post

In the early days of OS X, you (nor any malware) could add any file to or remove any file from /Applications

...without typing the admin password.
post #93 of 94
It's happening, folks. The assault has begun.

Yesterday a website asked me if I wanted to install a "Safari Update" as an Extension to Safari. The page looked VERY official, with the Apple favicon, Apple fonts, and images. But the URL was of course some ridiculously long and convoluted thing at linjini.com or something, can't remember. I got so nervous I Force Quitted and Logged out immediately. YIKES.

I also had "Auto open" downloads in Safari checked, I don't remember toggling that, perhaps it's on by default. Turned that off. edit: read PB's post, it's on by default! Yikes! That should be fixed!

I wonder if Firefox would be more secure on Mac? Or perhaps an even less popular browser like Opera that wouldn't be likely to be targeted?

This is a game-changer. I absolutely did not worry about spyware on my Mac until just now, because until now the only spyware or malware was from pirates intentionally downloading cracked software off BitTorrent. Apparently Apple is doing so well with marketshare they are now targeting us over the web, though. We must all now be more cautious. In general OS X is designed better in terms of security than Windows and Internet Explorer in my opinion and has much less marketshare and thus will still be targeted a lot less. But it's time to become more conscious of security for us Mac users. Think before clicking OK. We are a smart and tight community and perhaps if we all react strongly to this, we can repel further Mac malware attempts. I liken it to crappy applications. Mac users tolerate bad software less so than Windows users, and thus the average Mac app is better than the average Windows app. If we react strongly to this issue perhaps we can to some degree fight off Mac malware.
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"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
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post #94 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquatic View Post

It's happening, folks. The assault has begun.

Yesterday a website asked me if I wanted to install a "Safari Update" as an Extension to Safari. The page looked VERY official, with the Apple favicon, Apple fonts, and images. But the URL was of course some ridiculously long and convoluted thing at linjini.com or something, can't remember. I got so nervous I Force Quitted and Logged out immediately. YIKES.

I also had "Auto open" downloads in Safari checked, I don't remember toggling that, perhaps it's on by default. Turned that off. edit: read PB's post, it's on by default! Yikes! That should be fixed!

I wonder if Firefox would be more secure on Mac? Or perhaps an even less popular browser like Opera that wouldn't be likely to be targeted?

This is a game-changer. I absolutely did not worry about spyware on my Mac until just now, because until now the only spyware or malware was from pirates intentionally downloading cracked software off BitTorrent. Apparently Apple is doing so well with marketshare they are now targeting us over the web, though. We must all now be more cautious. In general OS X is designed better in terms of security than Windows and Internet Explorer in my opinion and has much less marketshare and thus will still be targeted a lot less. But it's time to become more conscious of security for us Mac users. Think before clicking OK. We are a smart and tight community and perhaps if we all react strongly to this, we can repel further Mac malware attempts. I liken it to crappy applications. Mac users tolerate bad software less so than Windows users, and thus the average Mac app is better than the average Windows app. If we react strongly to this issue perhaps we can to some degree fight off Mac malware.

From "what me worry" to "ruh, ruh" in 30 days flat.
http://forums.appleinsider.com/showthread.php?t=123632

My advice in that thread still stands. Many Mac users, particularly newer ones, could benefit from malware detection software and should at least consider it. The overhead hit will be minimal and probably not even noticed, but the benefits could be immense. Apple could even offer their own "run once" detection and removal software as Microsoft recently rolled out.
http://www.microsoft.com/security/sc...s/default.aspx
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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