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ARM expects to control 50% of mobile chip market by 2015

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Led by devices like the iPhone and iPad, ARM Holdings expects its reference chip designs to be found in 50 percent of mobile devices sold by the year 2015.

ARM-based chips are currently found in about 10 percent of mobile devices, and that number is expected by the company to increase to 15 percent by the end of 2011. But according to Bloomberg, ARM President Tudor Brown expects the company's share to explode in the next few years, reaching half of all mobile devices by 2015.

ARM currently plays an important role with Apple products, with the custom A5 processor found inside the iPad 2, while its predecessor, the A4, is found in the iPhone 4, fourth-generation iPod touch, and Apple TV, all released in 2010.

Apple's tremendous growth with sales of the iPhone and the new product category represented by the iPad have played an important part in the spread of ARM-based chips. And earlier this year, Microsoft announced it too would get into the ARM game with the next version of Windows to offer compatibility with the system-on-a-chip architecture.

Brown also said on Monday that he expects ARM to start generating royalty revenue from Microsoft by the end of 2012. While ARM is currently a major player in creating chips for devices like smartphones and tablets, the deal with Microsoft is expected to boost its presence in laptops as well.

The details come soon after a rumor surfaced that Apple, in its internal labs, built a test MacBook Air powered by the same low-power A5 processor found in the iPad 2. An anonymous source said the test MacBook Air "performed better than expected," though the device, allegedly built by Quanta Computer, was characterized as an "experiment."



Earlier this month, a separate rumor claimed that Apple plans to move its laptops from Intel to ARM processors "as soon as possible." It was said that Apple could begin the transition when 64-bit variations of ARM-based chip designs are available at the end of 2012 or by early 2013.

Apple began designing its own ARM-based chips starting with the release of the first-generation iPad, powered by its custom A4 processor. That became possible through Apple's acquisition of chipmaker PA Semi for $278 million in 2008.
post #2 of 27
Apple moving closer to self-sufficiency. A natural development.
post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Led by devices like the iPhone and iPad, ARM Holdings expects its reference chip designs to be found in 50 percent of mobile devices sold by the year 2015....

I think your title is off. "Control" is almost certainly the wrong word.

ARM will never "control" the processor market the way Intel attempts to. They only produce and licence designs. Their goal isn't domination or control of the market, it's just making a good chip design.
post #4 of 27
It should be 10% of Mobile PC devices. That is Tablet, Netbook and Notebook.

Since 99% of Tablet are ARM Powered, which basically means Tablet are already 10% of the total Mobile PC Market. And this is amazing growth!!!
post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Apple moving closer to self-sufficiency. A natural development.

I see it that way too... now, about those displays...
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post

It should be 10% of Mobile PC devices. That is Tablet, Netbook and Notebook.

Since 99% of Tablet are ARM Powered, which basically means Tablet are already 10% of the total Mobile PC Market. And this is amazing growth!!!

Yeah, I think you're right. Very deceiving title. I don't know one mobile device that doesn't use some form of their chipset.
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Led by devices like the iPhone and iPad, ARM Holdings expects its reference chip designs to be found in 50 percent of mobile devices sold by the year 2015.

Tablets and phones will be about half the mobile market... not a huge surprise

Quote:
ARM-based chips are currently found in about 10 percent of mobile devices, and that number is expected by the company to increase to 15 percent by the end of 2011. But according to Bloomberg, ARM President Tudor Brown expects the company's share to explode in the next few years, reaching half of all mobile devices by 2015.

More people buying phones/tablets than laptop right now. not a big surprise

Quote:
The details come soon after a rumor surfaced that Apple, in its internal labs, built a test MacBook Air powered by the same low-power A5 processor found in the iPad 2. An anonymous source said the test MacBook Air "performed better than expected," though the device, allegedly built by Quanta Computer, was characterized as an "experiment."

"better than expected" could mean they though it could run 1 window okay, and it could run 2 decently.... until someone explains what "better than expected" is i don't buy this.... i would advise more people to follow this for now
Quote:
Earlier this month, a separate rumor claimed that Apple plans to move its laptops from Intel to ARM processors "as soon as possible." It was said that Apple could begin the transition when 64-bit variations of ARM-based chip designs are available at the end of 2012 or by early 2013.

Apple began designing its own ARM-based chips starting with the release of the first-generation iPad, powered by its custom A4 processor. That became possible through Apple's acquisition of chipmaker PA Semi for $278 million in 2008.

This would be great--if they made a 11' laptop that costed like 900 that had like what, a 4 or 6 core ARM CPU? i don't see them being able to get enough performance to justify it right now. at least not for their CURRENT LAPTOPS.

possibility of education model only model?

PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

Reply

PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

Reply
post #8 of 27
Normally really great articles, but this one is really poor and no research!

Not sure how Appleinsider has defined the mobile chip market, but agree with other comments, that the numbers are way off. Today ARM absolutely dominates the market for mobile (as defined by most analysists), somewhere in the region of over 90% for mobile phones. ARM is used by almost every single chip vendor in the world, expect Intel. If we look consumer devices (basically anything a consumer buys in a electronics store, expect a PC) then ARM has this market sown up.

Some numbers:
- ARM shipped through it partners (silicon vendors) over 6bn devices (yes I said billion)
- Mobile accounts for a large proportion of this probably 60-70%
- It has 770 licensees for its CPUs

If you look at any typical smartphone you will have probably 3-4 ARM CPUs. One for the Apps processor, one in baseband, one for your combo wifi/BT chip, so there is three straight away!

I also noted that Appleinside believe ARM is growing off the back of Apple's devices like the iPhone etc. Although it is true that ARM benefits from growth in sales of Apple products and the reputation for powering some of the most iconic devices in the industry, Appleinsider I think misunderstands ARM's business.

It is in fact more accurate to say that when Apple entered the phone market ARM was the only real choice to use, as ARM is number one in this market. Apple has been using ARM CPUs since the first iPod, and in fact ARM and Apple have a relationship that goes back to the very founding of ARM, as a spin-out from Acorn Computers- An Apple competitor in the UK.

ARM's business is heavily royalty based (approximately 53% of revenue in Q1 for the Processor Division within ARM). So it is fair to say that volume shipments count. Although Apple is number one by value in the market, it is very low down the list when looking at shipment numbers (mobile phone total volume not smartphones). Q1 shipments: Nokia 108m, Samsung 70m, LG 24m, then Apple with almost 17m). Again the claim by Appleinsider is somewhat a stretch at the very least

Numbers I used form these presentations
ARM Q1 results presentation http://ir.arm.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=197211&p=irol-irhome
IDC Q1 mobile shipment numbers
http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS22808211


Cheers,

Kevin

Linkedin profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinmcintyre09
post #9 of 27
@kevin.mcintyre

Nice post.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #10 of 27
@solipsism

Nice observation.
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeanSolecki View Post

@solipsism

Nice observation.

@DeanSolecki

Nice compliment!
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #12 of 27
@ Dick Applebaum

Nice trend.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin.mcintyre View Post

Not sure how Appleinsider has defined the mobile chip market, but agree with other comments, that the numbers are way off. Today ARM absolutely dominates the market for mobile (as defined by most analysists), somewhere in the region of over 90% for mobile phones. ARM is used by almost every single chip vendor in the world, expect Intel. If we look consumer devices (basically anything a consumer buys in a electronics store, expect a PC) then ARM has this market sown up.

Some numbers:
- ARM shipped through it partners (silicon vendors) over 6bn devices (yes I said billion)
- Mobile accounts for a large proportion of this probably 60-70%
- It has 770 licensees for its CPUs

ARM's business is heavily royalty based (approximately 53% of revenue in Q1 for the Processor Division within ARM). So it is fair to say that volume shipments count. Although Apple is number one by value in the market, it is very low down the list when looking at shipment numbers (mobile phone total volume not smartphones). Q1 shipments: Nokia 108m, Samsung 70m, LG 24m, then Apple with almost 17m). Again the claim by Appleinsider is somewhat a stretch at the very least

considering an aprox total of 1Bn PC's (THAT MEANS PERSONAL COMPUTER, NOT NECESSARY WINDOWS, I HATE WHEN PEOPLE FORGET THIS) shipped when 2008 ended, aprox about 400 million laptops right now in 2011-not counting broken ones or unused ones...
ARM has a huge % of market already, in terms of mobile computing device

PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

Reply

PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

Reply
post #14 of 27
@ Sol...

I feel a compulsion to watch the movie "Guys and Dolls".
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

@kevin.mcintyre

Nice post.

Yes. Most people forget Apple was a co-founding partner of ARM (I think they had a 10% interest) and had a big say in the chip design (Apple used to design a lot of their own chips in the old days, and still does.)
Although it sounds odd to me to refer to baseband, BT and WiFi chips as "CPU's."

The AI article also makes it sound like ARM manufactures chips, but I'm pretty sure they just concentrate on designing excellent chips and then licensing their designs to others.
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin.mcintyre View Post

Normally really great articles, but this one is really poor and no research! [...]

Douché Kev. Great use of Google there.

Maybe the AppleInsider author should have said "All of this adds up to very bad news for Intel." It doesn't really matter if Apple ships 17.0 million ARM-based chips or 17.1 million. The point is that Intel is so locked in to supporting Windows and Office and their legacy x86 architecture that they have lost their focus on mobile.

It's like Detroit automakers and the U.S. oil companies. The automakers would prefer to make big, heavy, gas-guzzling SUVs because they don't need to conform to stringent air pollution laws. No need for expensive engineering, and they can sell tarted-up trucks for $60k. The oil companies love this because big, heavy, gas-guzzling SUVs create more demand for gas. A match made in heaven.

Same thing with Microsoft and Intel. Microsoft makes bloated, resource-hogging software. They can't help it. They've lost the ability to write lean, mean code. Intel loves this because bloated, resource-hogging software creates more demand for their latest hot-running power-sucking x86 chips. A match made in heaven.

Oh, and there's one more thing. This is a blog, not CNN. Opinions are fine on blogs.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

@ Dick Applebaum

Nice trend.

@solipsism ... nice teeth.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Douché Kev. Great use of Google there.

Maybe the AppleInsider author should have said "All of this adds up to very bad news for Intel." It doesn't really matter if Apple ships 17.0 million ARM-based chips or 17.1 million. The point is that Intel is so locked in to supporting Windows and Office and their legacy x86 architecture that they have lost their focus on mobile.

It's like Detroit automakers and the U.S. oil companies. The automakers would prefer to make big, heavy, gas-guzzling SUVs because they don't need to conform to stringent air pollution laws. No need for expensive engineering, and they can sell tarted-up trucks for $60k. The oil companies love this because big, heavy, gas-guzzling SUVs create more demand for gas. A match made in heaven.

Same thing with Microsoft and Intel. Microsoft makes bloated, resource-hogging software. They can't help it. They've lost the ability to write lean, mean code. Intel loves this because bloated, resource-hogging software creates more demand for their latest hot-running power-sucking x86 chips. A match made in heaven.

Oh, and there's one more thing. This is a blog, not CNN. Opinions are fine on blogs.

As long as Windows requires x86 instructions, Apple will have x86 processors because virtualizing is a big deal, IMHO. But it is Apple we are talking about so who really knows.
Hard-Core.
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Hard-Core.
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post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplnub View Post

As long as Windows requires x86 instructions, Apple will have x86 processors because virtualizing is a big deal, IMHO. But it is Apple we are talking about so who really knows.

Maybe one day in the future, a Mac will be able to have an Intel CPU as an optional extra for those that want it. Like a language card on an Apple ][
Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
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Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
Reply
post #20 of 27
Well, if this isn't a hint to load up on ARMH shares, I don't know what is.
post #21 of 27
Quote:

The AI article also makes it sound like ARM manufactures chips, but I'm pretty sure they just concentrate on designing excellent chips and then licensing their designs to others.

Well, the article says "ARM Holdings expects its reference chip designs to be found in 50 percent of mobile devices sold by the year 2015." No informed person should interpret that as suggesting ARM manufacturing their own chips.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplnub View Post

As long as Windows requires x86 instructions, Apple will have x86 processors because virtualizing is a big deal, IMHO. But it is Apple we are talking about so who really knows.

Well, that's ironic because Microsoft, and not Apple, is the one that has made an official announcement porting their OS to ARM architecture.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Yes. Most people forget Apple was a co-founding partner of ARM (I think they had a 10% interest) and had a big say in the chip design (Apple used to design a lot of their own chips in the old days, and still does.)
Although it sounds odd to me to refer to baseband, BT and WiFi chips as "CPU's."

The AI article also makes it sound like ARM manufactures chips, but I'm pretty sure they just concentrate on designing excellent chips and then licensing their designs to others.

Sorry my poor terminology They are in fact System on Chip (SoC), the integrated applications processor (apps processor) typically has several sub-systems on the chip. One for the main OS and general functions, another managing the mobile baseband, which typically has a real-time OS (RTOS). There are often multi-media sub systems which manage video, audio etc and can be one system or multiple. The apps and baseband sections for sure are today using an ARM core. The multi-media sub-system could also have a small ARM CPU core.

Connectivity (BT, WiFi, GPS, NFC etc) can be one or more SoCs depending on the configuration. If a combo chip then probably one ARM CPU, if two chips which is today still common (BT/WiFi with separate GPS is the most common), then usually as many as chips.

Hope that helps

Cheers,

Kevin
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

Douché Kev. Great use of Google there.

Maybe the AppleInsider author should have said "All of this adds up to very bad news for Intel." It doesn't really matter if Apple ships 17.0 million ARM-based chips or 17.1 million. The point is that Intel is so locked in to supporting Windows and Office and their legacy x86 architecture that they have lost their focus on mobile.

It's like Detroit automakers and the U.S. oil companies. The automakers would prefer to make big, heavy, gas-guzzling SUVs because they don't need to conform to stringent air pollution laws. No need for expensive engineering, and they can sell tarted-up trucks for $60k. The oil companies love this because big, heavy, gas-guzzling SUVs create more demand for gas. A match made in heaven.

Same thing with Microsoft and Intel. Microsoft makes bloated, resource-hogging software. They can't help it. They've lost the ability to write lean, mean code. Intel loves this because bloated, resource-hogging software creates more demand for their latest hot-running power-sucking x86 chips. A match made in heaven.

Oh, and there's one more thing. This is a blog, not CNN. Opinions are fine on blogs.

Sadly I am one of those who actually reads all this data (has always been part of my job), so had to just Googleit to find the right links
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post

Yes. Most people forget Apple was a co-founding partner of ARM (I think they had a 10% interest) and had a big say in the chip design (Apple used to design a lot of their own chips in the old days, and still does.)
Although it sounds odd to me to refer to baseband, BT and WiFi chips as "CPU's."

The AI article also makes it sound like ARM manufactures chips, but I'm pretty sure they just concentrate on designing excellent chips and then licensing their designs to others.

On ARM manufacturing chips, you are absolutely right, ARM does not manufacture chips themselves, they do a few test chips but that is it. ARM's business is in fact an Intellectual Property (IP) business, the largest in the world. Hence licensing and royalties are key for ARM. ARM sells the IP to major chip vendors like TI, Qualcomm, Freescale etc, they then turn the IP into a physical chip.

That said, if you look at where ARM is placed in the market, ie how the market views them, they are always put in the semiconductor bin as the market still does not get ARM is not an Intel.
post #26 of 27
They got a leg up on that one ROTFLMAO
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin.mcintyre View Post

It is in fact more accurate to say that when Apple entered the phone market ARM was the only real choice to use, as ARM is number one in this market. Apple has been using ARM CPUs since the first iPod, and in fact ARM and Apple have a relationship that goes back to the very founding of ARM, as a spin-out from Acorn Computers- An Apple competitor in the UK.

I'm not sure if ARM was the only real choice, but because ARM licenses its designs instead of manufacturing chips it gives Apple a lot of flexibility. They have licensed ARM's designs to add and modify them to fit their products better and they have the flexibility to seek out manufacturers the same way they do for other parts. This allows them to make great products and drive down their production costs.

It's also worth noting that Apple was an investor in ARM in its earliest days and Apple used ARM designs in the Newton MessagePad.
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