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Evidence suggests Apple will make Mac OS X Lion Server a paid App Store add-on

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
Mac OS X 10.7 Lion Server could be a paid add-on that users would download from the Mac App Store, according to evidence allegedly discovered in the Lion beta.

Searching "install server" in the help menu in a developer preview of Mac OS X Lion, a reader of French site HardMac reportedly discovered a note that claims Mac OS X Server in 10.7 Lion will be a paid add-on. The alleged note says that users can make their Mac a server by "installing the Server app."

An accompanying screenshot shows that the Server application will be available on the Mac App Store, and once it is purchased it will be available in the Applications folder. Users will then open the Server application to set up the software.

From there, users enter the name and password of an administrator account on the Mac in order to begin installing and setting up Lion Server software. The Server application allegedly downloads the Server Essentials software package and installs it, a process that will turn the Mac into a server.

The current version of Mac OS X Server for 10.6 Snow Leopard has a retail price of $499, granting users an unlimited client license. The help file does not offer any indication as to how much the Mac OS X Server application would cost on the Mac App Store.

With its developer previews of Mac OS X Lion, Apple has issued separate builds for the Server version of the Mac operating system. Preview 3 was released to developers in mid-May.



For more on Mac OS X 10.7 Lion Server, see AppleInsider's previous coverage:

Inside Mac OS X 10.7 Lion Server: Apple replaces Samba for Windows networking services

Inside Mac OS X 10.7 Lion Server: remote lock, disk wipe and administration

VMware vSphere 5 to add cloud virtualization support for Mac OS X Server

Why Apple axed Xserve, and how it can reenter the server market
post #2 of 43
This is odd, as it directly contradicts Apple's Lion preview page. From there:

"Lion Server is now part of Mac OS X Lion. It’s easy to set up your Mac as a server and take advantage of the many services Lion Server has to offer."
"Lion Server guides you through configuring your Mac as a server. And it provides local and remote administration — for users and groups, push notifications, file sharing, calendaring, mail, contacts, chat, Time Machine, VPN, web, and wiki services — all in one place."

That doesn't sound at all like a separate app to me. It sounds much more like an option in your System Preferences pane.
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post #3 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

This is odd, as it directly contradicts Apple's Lion preview page. From there:

"Lion Server is now part of Mac OS X Lion. It’s easy to set up your Mac as a server and take advantage of the many services Lion Server has to offer."
"Lion Server guides you through configuring your Mac as a server. And it provides local and remote administration — for users and groups, push notifications, file sharing, calendaring, mail, contacts, chat, Time Machine, VPN, web, and wiki services — all in one place."

That doesn't sound at all like a separate app to me. It sounds much more like an option in your System Preferences pane.

Perhaps once the app is installed everything works as you say. Maybe the app also acts as a server dashboard separate from System Prefs.
post #4 of 43
$499 is still a steal.

Windows 2008 R2 Standard runs $799 plus $35 per computer/user connecter to the server.
post #5 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

This is odd, as it directly contradicts Apple's Lion preview page. From there:

"Lion Server is now part of Mac OS X Lion. It’s easy to set up your Mac as a server and take advantage of the many services Lion Server has to offer."
"Lion Server guides you through configuring your Mac as a server. And it provides local and remote administration — for users and groups, push notifications, file sharing, calendaring, mail, contacts, chat, Time Machine, VPN, web, and wiki services — all in one place."

That doesn't sound at all like a separate app to me. It sounds much more like an option in your System Preferences pane.

I think it was Preview 2 of Lion that changed the way the server components were distributed. There is a separate redeem code for the server add-on in the Mac App Store. It's a small app at about 35MB When you first run I believe it will then download and load all the other server components.

If this might be a good thing. Even if it's free (though I'm thinking it will require a small fee) having it be purposeful action to use on your Mac may keep more novice users from thinking they need this to do daily tasks like organizing mail and user accounts.
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post #6 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I think it was Preview 2 of Lion that changed the way the server components were distributed. There is a separate redeem code for the server add-on in the Mac App Store. It's a small app at about 35MB When you first run I believe it will then download and load all the other server components.

If this might be a good thing. Even if it's free (though I'm thinking it will require a small fee) having be purposeful action to use on your Mac may keep more novice users from thinking they need this to do daily tasks like organizing mail and user accounts.

Agreed. It's like the Developer Tools that have been distributed with OS X discs as optional installs. Don't waste disk space or confuse users with stuff they will likely never need, but make their readily available.
post #7 of 43
I'm glad this is an add-on, rather than a separate install from the same disk, as I want to have a play with the server parts and see if they can do anything interesting for me. For the same reason, I wouldn't pay a lot of money for it.

I think there's a lot of people setting up interest groups and small businesses that will find value in the server components.
So Apple should encourage people to explore with cheap licensing for small groups.

I assume I have to get a fixed IP address from my ISP if I really want to go to town and play with email serving etc.

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post #8 of 43
I have a SL server with sensitive data that does not connect to the Internet (it runs internally on a private 10.0.0.x network). I installed it from DVD and download updates on a different machine and transfer them over on a portable drive. I'm hoping that I can continue to keep it isolated if I upgrade to Lion, but relying on the App Store will throw that out the window.
post #9 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

I have a SL server with sensitive data that does not connect to the Internet (it runs internally on a private 10.0.0.x network). I installed it from DVD and download updates on a different machine and transfer them over on a portable drive. I'm hoping that I can continue to keep it isolated if I upgrade to Lion, but relying on the App Store will throw that out the window.

You should be fine. Lion and Lion server on the Mac App Store aren't encapsulated in DRM like App Store apps so you can DL from a connected machine and then transfer to your server. There may some hoops to jump through with the secondary install package but I bet by the time Lion goes live there will be plenty of sites detailing how to DL the package directly. Also, Apple using the Mac App Store as the primary distribution for Lion and Lion Server doesn't mean they won't offer a DVD version, too.
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post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Apple using the Mac App Store as the primary distribution for Lion and Lion Server doesn't mean they won't offer a DVD version, too.

I'm sure that Lion (client) will be available on DVD; some people are still stuck with dial-up! But Lion Server might be a different case where Apple assumes anyone running their server software will also have some form of broadband. We'll have to see when it is finally released.

Regardless, I hope there isn't some sort of requirement for the actual machine to be net-connected to get running. (Even with Snow Leopard Server one can enter the software key offline with no phoning home.) The growing push for the App Store makes me a little wary in this regard.
post #11 of 43
Are any App Store apps currently limited to install on a single machine?
post #12 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

This is odd, as it directly contradicts Apple's Lion preview page. From there:

"Lion Server is now part of Mac OS X Lion. Its easy to set up your Mac as a server and take advantage of the many services Lion Server has to offer."
"Lion Server guides you through configuring your Mac as a server. And it provides local and remote administration for users and groups, push notifications, file sharing, calendaring, mail, contacts, chat, Time Machine, VPN, web, and wiki services all in one place."

That doesn't sound at all like a separate app to me. It sounds much more like an option in your System Preferences pane.

I thought the same thing. I think I'll believe Apple's website over a rumor based on a help page out of a developer build.
post #13 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I thought the same thing. I think I'll believe Apple's website over a rumor based on a help page out of a developer build.

They both can be true. All the tools for getting your ios Lion to be a server are a part of Lion, although to get it running you need to visit the app store. This makes a lot of sense actually.
post #14 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I thought the same thing. I think I'll believe Apple's website over a rumor based on a help page out of a developer build.

It's not a rumor, it's how it's currently being delivered. Whether that alters for the final release is another story but it's not uncommon for featutes to change or disappear altogether between Apple's initial OS specs and their final release.
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post #15 of 43
You could still "buy" a free app from the App Store. Or it could be a mere $4.99, like the Developer tools.
post #16 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

This is odd, as it directly contradicts Apple's Lion preview page. From there:

"Lion Server is now part of Mac OS X Lion. Its easy to set up your Mac as a server and take advantage of the many services Lion Server has to offer."
"Lion Server guides you through configuring your Mac as a server. And it provides local and remote administration for users and groups, push notifications, file sharing, calendaring, mail, contacts, chat, Time Machine, VPN, web, and wiki services all in one place."

That doesn't sound at all like a separate app to me. It sounds much more like an option in your System Preferences pane.

Thank you for saving me the trouble of looking it up. I agree.

We have no idea what this "Server app" might be. Doesn't mean it's part of, or necessary for, Mac OS X Server. For all we know, it's merely an install wizard to ease/facilitate server installation/configuration, as the "Aide > Server Help" text in the screenshot suggests.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

$499 is still a steal.

Not if you're a non-profit on a limited budget.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

I have a SL server with sensitive data that does not connect to the Internet (it runs internally on a private 10.0.0.x network). I installed it from DVD and download updates on a different machine and transfer them over on a portable drive. I'm hoping that I can continue to keep it isolated if I upgrade to Lion, but relying on the App Store will throw that out the window.

Lion will be available on DVD. Mark my words!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

I'm sure that Lion (client) will be available on DVD; some people are still stuck with dial-up! But Lion Server might be a different case where Apple assumes anyone running their server software will also have some form of broadband. We'll have to see when it is finally released.

Regardless, I hope there isn't some sort of requirement for the actual machine to be net-connected to get running. (Even with Snow Leopard Server one can enter the software key offline with no phoning home.) The growing push for the App Store makes me a little wary in this regard.

Interesting thought. But i doubt it. The assumption that all servers are InterNet facing isn't a valid one. Lot's of servers out there which are LAN-only, for security reasons. Apple is aware of this too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I thought the same thing. I think I'll believe Apple's website over a rumor based on a help page out of a developer build.

Ditto.


Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

It's not a rumor, it's how it's currently being delivered.

Actually, yes this is a rumor. While the existence of the software may be said to be factual, it's purpose is unknown and is pure speculation at this point.
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

$499 is still a steal.

Windows 2008 R2 Standard runs $799 plus $35 per computer/user connecter to the server.


Linux is free. $499 is a ripoff as is $799.
post #18 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by enzomedici View Post

Linux is free. $499 is a ripoff as is $799.

Linux is free if you have lots of free time.
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcahill009 View Post

They both can be true. All the tools for getting your ios Lion to be a server are a part of Lion, although to get it running you need to visit the app store. This makes a lot of sense actually.

Is that an announcement... a faux pas?
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post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Hawkeye_ View Post

Thank you for saving me the trouble of looking it up. I agree.

We have no idea what this "Server app" might be. Doesn't mean it's part of, or necessary for, Mac OS X Server. For all we know, it's merely an install wizard to ease/facilitate server installation/configuration, as the "Aide > Server Help" text in the screenshot suggests.

[…]

Actually, yes this is a rumor. While the existence of the software may be said to be factual, it's purpose is unknown and is pure speculation at this point.

If you read the damn thread you can see that we know exactly what Server.app does and what its purpose. If you read the screenshot it tells you exactly what it does.





The only thing to be speculated is if it will be part of the standard, consumer Lion purchase or separate, and if it will be free or paid, but if we are exclude everything that exists and has been dished for months on tech blogs then Lion being distributed to devs via the Mac App Store is also just a rumour. Here is one such write up from February: http://www.facebook.com/note.php?not...50097737406190
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post #21 of 43
How is all of this going to work in an enterprise environment? App stores don't really go with the way software is distributed in the enterprise world.
post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

If you read the damn thread

I did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

you can see that we know exactly what Server.app does and what its purpose. If you read the screenshot it tells you exactly what it does.

But it doesn't tell you if it's essential to installing the Server portion, or if it might simply be something which facilitates installation.

Which is what i said previously, if you had read my post a little more carefully.
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Hawkeye_ View Post

I did.



But it doesn't tell you if it's essential to installing the Server portion, or if it might simply be something which facilitates installation.

Which is what i said previously, if you had read my post a little more carefully.


It's been a while...

But I have:

1) Taken a standard OS X system and added the necessary bits to act as a Web Server, Web Application server, etc.

2) Installed OS X Server

The OS X Server automates everything in 1), (saving hours of work at the CLI level) -- then provides additional services and high-level GUI to manage the system.


So, the answer is if you want to do all the low-level stuff, install/setup Apache, etc. -- the OS X Server Component is not necessary.

But if you want the added function, management capabilities, and ease-of-use -- even a $499 price tag is a bargain for what you get including an unlimited numbr of client seats.


There are rumors about the TimeMachine evolving into a iOS-based Home Server. I can visualize a later release adding general-purpose server capability to iOS -- similar to what they are doing with Lion.
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post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by zorinlynx View Post

How is all of this going to work in an enterprise environment? App stores don't really go with the way software is distributed in the enterprise world.

I can visualize a use for an app store-like distribution/installation/update capability for enterprise.

One way to think of it is :

Big Enterprise Insurance has 500 branches world wide.

Currently Headquarters IT configures all software centrally and then distributes by whatever means -- somehow monitoring install progress in the branches.


Apple says to BEI: "Why don't you use the Apple Cloud Service to help you?"

The Apple Cloud service would work just like a "Private App Store for BEI installations only!"

You, BEI, decide what goes in, when and who, has access -- and get a record of every download and successful install.


Yeah... that could work!
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post #25 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

Linux is free if you have lots of free time.

And not nearly so free if you're using it an enterprise environment with equivalent support.
post #26 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveH View Post

And not nearly so free if you're using it an enterprise environment with equivalent support.

What can be said about "Support" for OS X Server in the same context? Everything I read suggests Apple themselves are not really in tune with the expectations of enterprise support. A lot of organisations offer third party enterprise support for Windows and Linux (and AIX, 390, etc). Are there organisations which do the same with Apple's offerings?

Genuine questions. I honestly don't know. I've never seem a Mac in a server room.
post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

This is odd, as it directly contradicts Apple's Lion preview page. From there:

"Lion Server is now part of Mac OS X Lion. It’s easy to set up your Mac as a server and take advantage of the many services Lion Server has to offer."
"Lion Server guides you through configuring your Mac as a server. And it provides local and remote administration — for users and groups, push notifications, file sharing, calendaring, mail, contacts, chat, Time Machine, VPN, web, and wiki services — all in one place."

That doesn't sound at all like a separate app to me. It sounds much more like an option in your System Preferences pane.

no where does it say that it will be free. or that it is built in etc

and if Lion is only by MAS as some rumors suggest, it makes sense to divide things up so folks that won't ever use server don't have to bother with those bits

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post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Hawkeye_ View Post

Not if you're a non-profit on a limited budget.

Apple, Microsoft, and most other companies offer non-profit pricing models (steep discounts) of some sort.

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post #29 of 43
Hopefully the fact that they are separating it out suggests Lion itself will be cheaper than in the past. I really hope Lion is released at WWDC!
post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

$499 is still a steal.

Windows 2008 R2 Standard runs $799 plus $35 per computer/user connecter to the server.

Cant run OSX server on any sever class hardware, so its a toy at this point...you cant buy servers from Apple (note, the mac mini is not a server, its a headless laptop), you cant install on bare metal HP Dell etc. boxes and you cant run it in VMWare esxi or MS Hyper-V so to call it a "server" OS at this opint is misleading. It is a desktop client build with a few server apps added on...Real server OSes install in an incredibly minimalist fashion, allowing you to just install the roles and services that you need.

OSX Server is a toy, Windows server is an enterprise class tool. That is why MS can command that premium.
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post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by zorinlynx View Post

How is all of this going to work in an enterprise environment? App stores don't really go with the way software is distributed in the enterprise world.

Oddly enough, I I have been reading up on MS System Center vNext AKA 2012 and they are implementing an app store for enterprises, which will actually make life really nice for IT folks who manage licensing like myself. Basically, we can publish apps to the app store and the end users could select the apps they need and for the ones that don't require licensing, like internal apps or some OSS apps we use, they just need their managers approval and it happens with no IT intervention. If they need a license, we get the approved request from the manager, go to the needed director for signoff on the expense, add it to our volume license count for true up and distribute the app to teh PC, so yes, this model is definitely coming to a corporation near you, soon.
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post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I really hope Lion is released at WWDC!

And I really hope it isn't. It's nowhere near ready.

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post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

OSX Server is a toy, Windows server is an enterprise class tool.

I think the mainframe boys would take issue with your assessment.

(And what's with the chest-beating? Was this an issue in the article that warrants your expenditure of testosterone ?)
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

Cant run OSX server on any sever class hardware, so its a toy at this point...you cant buy servers from Apple (note, the mac mini is not a server, its a headless laptop), you cant install on bare metal HP Dell etc. boxes and you cant run it in VMWare esxi or MS Hyper-V so to call it a "server" OS at this opint is misleading. It is a desktop client build with a few server apps added on...Real server OSes install in an incredibly minimalist fashion, allowing you to just install the roles and services that you need.

OSX Server is a toy, Windows server is an enterprise class tool. That is why MS can command that premium.

A needless distinction.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Server

Quote:
A computer that manages centralized data storage or network communications resources. A server provides and organizes access to these resources for other computers linked to it.

A Mac mini running Snow Leopard Server is every bit the part of being a server by definition. People are free to make up their own "personal" definitions but the world at large still uses the good ole dictionary at their source so as not to get confused.
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post #35 of 43
I wonder how an upgrade path for an existing 10.6.x OS X Server will work.

And I wonder if they will have dumbed down server. I run multiple e-mail virtual domains on mine, for instance. This requires some low level text file edits in postfix.

And I wonder if they will have switched some server tooling (which will cost me a lot of time).

And I wonder how a 10.6.x server will play with 10.7 clients in case I decide that upgrading my server will have to wait.

And I wonder if portable home directory syncing will finally work decently. It is a nice idea but gives tons of headaches when in practical use and is the part of OS X Server which takes by far the the most of my time to repair all the time.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

I think the mainframe boys would take issue with your assessment.

(And what's with the chest-beating? Was this an issue in the article that warrants your expenditure of testosterone ?)

I guess I may have failed to communicate what I am thinking on this: the post I quoted mentioned that Mac OSX Server was a good cost value over Windows at todays prices, $499 vs say $800 for win server. I was simply saying that Apple has to give away the server OS because most people who buy server OSes demand a certin level of hardware to run them on that Apple no longer sells. Take a top end Mac Pro and cram it into a 1 or 2-u rack mountable enclosure and you have something, I can not imagine any real big shops putting mac minis in a data center, no dual NICs? no redundant power? no fiber channel or other san interface and no slots fr these things make it a no go.

OSX server on consumer hardware may be a good solution for some small mom and pop shops or the few that need mac only server tools like FCS but mom and pop shops arent gonna fork out $500 for a server OS when the cloud can take care of most of their stuff, pro shops that need FCS will use mac pros cause they have no choice and no one else will touch it, ergo there is no more market for a $500 apple server software product - open it up to virtualization and the story changes instantly.


I call OSX Server a toy not because it is bad, it is a pretty great OS, but I believe that it is so handicapped because it can not run on the kind of hardware that will allow it to flex its muscle.
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post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

Windows server is an enterprise class tool.

I wouldn't be that harsh, Steve Ballmer is an enterprise class tool, but Windows isn't so bad.

Actually I'm not so sure Apple is interested in selling OS X Server to enterprises, it is more aimed at small business. They even discontinued their rack Mac.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I wouldn't be that harsh, Steve Ballmer is an enterprise class tool, but Windows isn't so bad.

Actually I'm not so sure Apple is interested in selling OS X Server to enterprises, it is more aimed at small business. They even discontinued their rack Mac.

you called Ballmer right LOL

as to OSX in small shops, for the sub-25 seat non IT related shops, I dont really see much of any need for on site servers with services like google docs, Office 365, carbonite, and quickbooks online, why woulod Joes Plumbing or some other non web design type firm need servers? For massive onsite file storage, tehre are plenty of cheap NAS boxes that are gonna work fine without server OS management complexity. I think even apple offers such a device, like a router with a HDD in it - I dont know exactly because I dont use or read up on apple networking gear.
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post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

It's been a while...

But I have:

1) Taken a standard OS X system and added the necessary bits to act as a Web Server, Web Application server, etc.

2) Installed OS X Server

Me too (both 1 & 2).


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

The OS X Server automates everything in 1), (saving hours of work at the CLI level) -- then provides additional services and high-level GUI to manage the system.

So, the answer is if you want to do all the low-level stuff, install/setup Apache, etc. -- the OS X Server Component is not necessary.

But if you want the added function, management capabilities, and ease-of-use -- even a $499 price tag is a bargain for what you get including an unlimited numbr of client seats.

The $499 is certainly a bargain if you're comparing against Windoze-based solutions. Not a bargain if you're a non-profit, hobbiest, or even a small business on a shoestring budget. In other words: It's relative.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

There are rumors about the TimeMachine evolving into a iOS-based Home Server. I can visualize a later release adding general-purpose server capability to iOS -- similar to what they are doing with Lion.

That's fine, if one limits it to a LAN server. I've seen some iomega NAS drives which do this. But i wouldn't want my backup HD exposed to the InterNet. I'd even be concerned about this if the backup were encrypted. It's just better to separate any backup device from any InterNet facing device, in my opinion.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

Apple, Microsoft, and most other companies offer non-profit pricing models (steep discounts) of some sort.

Apple doesn't offer non-profit discounts. At least when i last checked (circa 2006). Back in the late 80's, they didn't offer discounts, but they did do some grant giving to non-profits. But they discontinued that in the early 90's.

The only discounts which Apple does, as far as i'm aware, are educational discounts (which apply to both students and teachers).


Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Hopefully the fact that they are separating it out suggests Lion itself will be cheaper than in the past.

Uh, they're not separating it out. It was separate. They're consolidating it, as per Apple's website (cited above).

Be that as it may, the cost of Server was halved with Snow Leopard (if you were an unlimited customer; essentially no change in price if you were a 10-client customer).

Given that Apple has withdrawn from the rack-mounted server hardware business, it makes sense that they would roll the server OS in the client OS, and essentially give it away for free. It adds more value to the Mac platform, particularly for small businesses and non-profits, and doesn't really cost Apple that much more. As Dick Applebaum alludes to above, most of what is needed for a server is already contained in the client version of Mac OS X. Most of the difference between the client and server versions of Mac OS X is in the GUI interfaces for already installed components in the client version (e.g. Apache, Postfix, etc.) However server does add a few missing components (e.g. MySQL, Dovecot, etc.) But these are open source products, and represent very little cost for Apple.


Quote:
Originally Posted by a_greer View Post

I guess I may have failed to communicate what I am thinking on this: the post I quoted mentioned that Mac OSX Server was a good cost value over Windows at todays prices, $499 vs say $800 for win server. I was simply saying that Apple has to give away the server OS because most people who buy server OSes demand a certin level of hardware to run them on that Apple no longer sells. Take a top end Mac Pro and cram it into a 1 or 2-u rack mountable enclosure and you have something, I can not imagine any real big shops putting mac minis in a data center, no dual NICs? no redundant power? no fiber channel or other san interface and no slots fr these things make it a no go.

OSX server on consumer hardware may be a good solution for some small mom and pop shops or the few that need mac only server tools like FCS but mom and pop shops arent gonna fork out $500 for a server OS when the cloud can take care of most of their stuff, pro shops that need FCS will use mac pros cause they have no choice and no one else will touch it, ergo there is no more market for a $500 apple server software product - open it up to virtualization and the story changes instantly.

I call OSX Server a toy not because it is bad, it is a pretty great OS, but I believe that it is so handicapped because it can not run on the kind of hardware that will allow it to flex its muscle.

Your clarification is helpful; didn't get that from your previous post. Agree with most everything.

Seems to me somebody could come along and make a 1 or 2-u rack mountable enclosure into which you can drop a couple Mac minis. Not only do you get redundant power supplies, you get redundant servers!
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by _Hawkeye_ View Post

Uh, they're not separating it out. It was separate. They're consolidating it, as per Apple's website (cited above).

I sure hope not. The method introduced with Preview 2 is much nicer and, as i've previously argued, overall better for the consumer.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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