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Apple announces iTunes Match music service for $24.99 per year - Page 5

post #161 of 173
I wonder if there will ever be any features that facilitate sharing of the songs you upload (the ones that do not get matched by existing iTMS content). So, if I have my original music on my mac, and it gets uploaded to iCloud, can I authorize a friend to listen to it?

I'm curious about how sharing any document in iCloud will work, actually.
post #162 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by crzdcolombian View Post

so the quality isn't good on the icloud? I have really old CDs from my parents who have the 1st Bob Dylan, Beatles, etc releases before all this remastered crap. Never bothered to buy the remastered ones. Will they update my songs? Also how do they know which ones I stole and which ones I bought? I mean I have had a mac since 2005 but have been ripping CDs since 2000. I have about 15,000 songs. Most of which was when itunes had that cool hack where you basically can take every song off a computer on your network. Worked wonders in College. I went from 2,000 songs to 10,000 in no time.

They won't update the sound quality of songs NOT on Itunes. Apple says they update to 256k on MATCHED songs, which means songs only from Itunes. They don't actually take each song and remaster it into 256k.

Basically what they are doing is taking your Itunes music and converting to higher quality, which you can do yourself in Itunes. Now the only way to upgrade the quality of your non-Itunes music is to re-import the tracks to 256k straight to Itunes.

The $25 is for allowing you to have your music synced and backed up to their iCloud, so when you lose your iPhone and get a new one, your music just downloads. If you stop paying $25 what happens is you will still have your music on the cloud but if you try to upload more stuff without paying another $25 it won't let you. Not that big of a deal you will just have it on your computer and it won't sync with iCloud.

For example, If somebody bought CDs all their life and never had Itunes until iCloud comes out, then they pay $25 for one year and they sync half of the CDs in that year and then doesn't renew for another year, he would just have that music on the cloud to sync and download and the other half would just be on their Itunes local hard drive unable to sync until he pays $25 again.

I seriously doubt Apple will cut you off from your own non-Itunes music that you originally had (and most likely BOUGHT). That's like saying hey give me $25 a year or you can't get your music of our cloud! Apple customers would be rioting outside every Apple store coast to coast.
post #163 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by schwabsauce View Post

I wonder if there will ever be any features that facilitate sharing of the songs you upload (the ones that do not get matched by existing iTMS content). So, if I have my original music on my mac, and it gets uploaded to iCloud, can I authorize a friend to listen to it?

I'm curious about how sharing any document in iCloud will work, actually.

Not off iCloud, but you can use the Airdrop if you get OSX Lion and link to someone else who also has Lion via WiFi and share files that way.
post #164 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Maxx View Post

They won't update the sound quality of songs NOT on Itunes. Apple says they update to 256k on MATCHED songs, which means songs only from Itunes. They don't actually take each song and remaster it into 256k.

Basically what they are doing is taking your Itunes music and converting to higher quality, which you can do yourself in Itunes. Now the only way to upgrade the quality of your non-Itunes music is to re-import the tracks to 256k straight to Itunes.

Wrong. They update all matched songs.

Quote:
I seriously doubt Apple will cut you off from your own non-Itunes music that you originally had (and most likely BOUGHT). That's like saying hey give me $25 a year or you can't get your music of our cloud! Apple customers would be rioting outside every Apple store coast to coast.

That's right, they dont delete your local files anyway so how could this happen?
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #165 of 173
If I transfer some of my old scratchy LP's on to my computer and iTunes had nice clean versions I could essentially finally replace some of my albums with clean digital copies???

Red
post #166 of 173
Since there seems to be a bit of confusion about what matching and "in iTunes" means: Apple will replace (provide access to download) any music file you have (which will be "in iTunes" regardless of whether or not you purchased it through iTunes) if Apple has that song in their iTunes data base. The "upload your own" bit just comes in when the song has no match with Apple's servers, and is what counts against the 25,000 song limit. Obviously Apple can't provide a higher quality copy of music they don't have.

So all your low quality rips or LP transfers or otherwise acquired music may be eligible for a quality upgrade assuming that 1) its current quality is less than 256 AAC and 2) Apple has a copy of that song in their iTunes data base.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #167 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Since there seems to be a bit of confusion about what matching and "in iTunes" means: Apple will replace (provide access to download) any music file you have (which will be "in iTunes" regardless of whether or not you purchased it through iTunes) if Apple has that song in their iTunes data base. The "upload your own" bit just comes in when the song has no match with Apple's servers, and is what counts against the 25,000 song limit. Obviously Apple can't provide a higher quality copy of music they don't have.

So all your low quality rips or LP transfers or otherwise acquired music may be eligible for a quality upgrade assuming that 1) its current quality is less than 256 AAC and 2) Apple has a copy of that song in their iTunes data base.

To get a good idea of what will be a match and is available in iTunes choose/highlight Music in Library section of your iTunes sidebar then go > View > View Options > Show Columns. Select, Kind, Purchase Date and Release Date. When finished click Ok.
Distinguishing info should now appear when View as List or View as Cover Flow are selected.
post #168 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmgr View Post

To get a good idea of what will be a match and is available in iTunes choose/highlight Music in Library section of your iTunes sidebar then go > View > View Options > Show Columns. Select, Kind, Purchase Date and Release Date. When finished click Ok.
Distinguishing info should now appear when View as List or View as Cover Flow are selected.

I think that just shows you which songs you originally purchased from iTunes (unless they've changed it up in the latest release).

The cool thing about Match is that they'll give you an AAC 256kbps copy of any tune you have that exists in Apple's iTunes library, no matter where you originally got the song.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #169 of 173
I wonder about titles with multiple releases. Like 'remastered' titles.

For instance, there have been two releases of the Beatles. If I have the 1980s Sgt. Pepper, will I get the 2009 Sgt. Pepper?

Or none at all.

There have been multiple releases for Lots of artists. Queen, has now had three.
post #170 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleZilla View Post

I wonder about titles with multiple releases. Like 'remastered' titles.

For instance, there have been two releases of the Beatles. If I have the 1980s Sgt. Pepper, will I get the 2009 Sgt. Pepper?

Or none at all.

There have been multiple releases for Lots of artists. Queen, has now had three.

if they have both, and you tag correctly, then they will match correctly.

( Of course a few months ago the matching wouldn't have worked for The Beatles)
I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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I wanted dsadsa bit it was taken.
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post #171 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

if they have both, and you tag correctly, then they will match correctly.

( Of course a few months ago the matching wouldn't have worked for The Beatles)

Well, they won't have the originals, digitally. They never existed.

Pointless for me to even speculate. Nothing will be for sure until iCloud is launched in 'Fall.'

Fall, btw, lasts until December 22.

Sigh.
post #172 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwynn View Post

Apparently i was the one missunderstanding.

So it's basically a remote sync to Apples's servers as opposed to your local iTunes?

That's all it is. The whole point of the big push for iCloud is to facilitate "Computerless" activation, management and storage for all IOS devices. When implemented all syncs will be with the iCloud, not iTunes. To that end all the cloud is doing is push music to your devices.

While experimenting with IOS 5 and iTunes 10.5 Betas, I purchased a song from my PC. It downloaded from the Cloud, didn't stream. It was also automatically downloaded to my iPad without any action on my part.

So the remaining $64 question is what happens to those "Matched" songs downloaded to your devices when you unsubscribe from the Match service. Will they be automatically deleted from your devices. I suspect so. If the Cloud can "push" a song automatically it can sure "suck" one too!
post #173 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

Wrong. They update all matched songs.

Exactly -- if a ripped song in your library lines up with a song that's already available for sale on iTunes (what James Maxx said in his first paragraph), then the iCloud version of the song (which gets pushed to all your iDevices) will be the iTunes version, in all its 256 kbps glory.

BUT, if a ripped song in your library is not available in iTunes, then it will not be updated to 256 kbps, and the iCloud version which gets pushed to all your devices, will be an exact copy of your original file, at its original bitrate, whatever that happens to be.
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