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Apple planning massive 12,000 capacity "spaceship" campus in Cupertino

post #1 of 304
Thread Starter 
The day after giving a keynote at the Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple CEO Steve Jobs presented the company's plans for a second campus in Cupertino, Calif., which would feature a round building that would hold 12,000 Apple employees, to the city council.

"Apple's grown like a weed. And, as you know, we've always been in Cupertino. Started in a little office park and eventually got the buildings we are in now," Jobs said, as first noted by TechCrunch adding that the current campus at One Infinite Loop holds about 2,600 employees.

According to Jobs, Apple has almost 12,000 people in the area and has been forced to rent buildings "at an ever greater radius" form its headquarters. The new office building would augment the Infinite Loop facilities, rather than replacing them.

Apple has purchased roughly 150 acres for the new campus, with the bulk of the land coming from a land purchase from Hewlett Packard along Pruneridge Ave. Jobs noted that the land is "kind of special" to him because HP founders Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard were childhood "idols" of his.

"When I was 13, I called up Bill Hewlett because he lived in Palo Alto and there were no unlisted phone numbers in the phone book, which gives you a clue to my age," Jobs reminisced. "And he picked up the phone and I talked to him and asked him if he'd give me some spare parts for something I was building called a frequency counter. And he did, but in addition to that, he gave me something way more important. He gave me a job that summer, a summer job at Hewlett Packard right here in Santa Clara off 280 at the division that built frequency counters. And I was in heaven.



"As Hewlett Packard has been shrinking lately, they decided to sell off some property and we bought it," he continued.

Jobs said Apple had hired some of the best architects in the world to work on the design of the new campus. Apple expects to break ground on the facility next year in hopes of opening the campus in 2015.



"It's a little like a spaceship landed. "It's got this gorgeous courtyard in the middle, but it's got a lot more," Jobs said when he unveiled the design, noting later that Apple may "have a shot at building the best office building in the world. I think it could be that good."

"It's a circle, and so it's curved all the way around. There's not a straight piece of glass in this building. We've used our experience in building retail buildings all over the world. We know how to make the biggest pieces of glass for architectural use."



Jobs highlighted the fact that the new campus would consist of 80 percent landscaping, compared to the land's current ratio of 20 percent. Apple would nearly double the number of trees on the property from 3,700 to 6,000.

The facility and adjacent parking structure would be only four stories high in order to preserve the "human scale" of the campus. Apple also plans to supply its own power, using the city grid as backup.

The campus would have an auditorium for presentations, as well as a fitness center and separate R&D facilities. The space would take up 3.1 million square feet, with a main building footprint of 1 million square feet.



Mayor Gilbert Wong remarked after Jobs' presentation that "definitely the mother ship has landed here in Cupertino."

When asked what benefits city residents would gain from the campus, Jobs reminded the council that Apple is Cupertino's largest tax payer. "We'd like to continue to stay here and pay taxes. If we can't, we'd have to go somewhere like Mountain View and take our current people and over years sell the land."

Jobs also pointed out that Apple "employs some really talented people across the whole age spectrum." He described Apple employees as "fairly affluent" and likely to live near the campus.

When one councilwoman asked if free Wi-Fi for the city was a possibility, Jobs replied, "I'm a simpleton, I've always had this view that we pay taxes and the city pays to do this kind of thing. Now if we can get out of taxes, I'd be happy to put up Wi-Fi."

Apple's current campus, left; Proposed facility, right

Apple had originally planned a smaller 50-acre second campus intended to house 3,000 to 3,500 employees, but was held up during the rezoning process. In 2009, the rezoning of the Pruneridge Ave property from residential to industrial use was approved. In 2010, Apple purchased the adjacent 98-acre HP property.
post #2 of 304
Has to be one of the most beautiful office buildings in the world!!! Curved glass, lots of open land, mostly underground parking .... wow!
post #3 of 304
Like a weed?
post #4 of 304
And the apartment complex in the corner is not for sale?

Can you say eminent domain for Cupertino's largest taxpayer?
post #5 of 304
The irony is that it really is a spaceship! Powered by magic and stuff!

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #6 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

The irony is that it really is a spaceship! Powered by magic and stuff!

Ha ha! Apple has access to alien technology, now it all makes sense
post #7 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by halhiker View Post

Can you say eminent domain for Cupertino's largest taxpayer?

I can say Fortress of Solitude, with minions. Did he say they were going to build it or land it?

The new Aviva stadium here in Dublin also looks like a giant glass-covered spaceship that has just plonked down in a low-rise residential area. There are prettier angles than this but it looks awesome looming above small little houses with nothing else in the skyline.

post #8 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by halhiker View Post

And the apartment complex in the corner is not for sale?

Can you say eminent domain for Cupertino's largest taxpayer?

Wondered the same thing. But that does take time. Law suits etc.
This won't be an easy permit process. Dirt haul way, power plant rules, traffic flow to streets etc etc. It's not like it's some farm land in the country side. How ever, most smart cities work with companies during the design phase to iron those things out. Sounds like they have started that.

That aside... Looks great.
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
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post #9 of 304
Powered by Blue Energy, the grid as a back up
I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
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I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
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post #10 of 304
So Apple are building their own particle accelerator?

The concept looks spectacular. I really love how Apple are trying to return so much of the surface land back to its indigenous state. The building really looks like it's sharing the land with nature rather than dominating it.

This is exactly what modern companies should be doing with their new buildings.
post #11 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by halhiker View Post

And the apartment complex in the corner is not for sale?

Can you say eminent domain for Cupertino's largest taxpayer?

The owner of that apartment complex has just realized he owns some if the most valuable apartment buildings in California. He was smart by not selling. The only bad part for now will be the deafening construction noise while they are contructing that huge building.

Will be a work of art when it's done!
post #12 of 304
At Pixar, Job's was instrumental in the design of their new campus in Emeryville. As the Pixar guys have mentioned in various short films about their workplace, Jobs wanted the a central open area in the building so that everyone would at some point run into everyone else during the course of a day or week, as the pizza place, mail, recreation, and main screening rooms were all around that court.

Seems to me, he's doing the same thing at Apple. He's going to leave them a building which embodies his notions of how Apple should be configured in order to thrive.

Infinite Loop was designed and in place prior to Job's return.
post #13 of 304
Welcome to Eureka.

Absolutely stunning. This man's vision will continue long into the future.
post #14 of 304
I like the green space inside the circle. Looks like a beautiful walled garden!
post #15 of 304
Damn his presentation was better than the WWDC Keynote!!! All the jokes about making the thinnest and best office campus came true!!!
post #16 of 304
Does that mean everyone will have a window view and not just some have a view of the window?

This looks stunning. I can't help but think how happy people will be working here which will mean better products due to inspiration.

Can someone give me a green card? I would like to work as a product tester. If gear can survive a month with me it's awesome. My MacBook Pro lasted 3 years with me until a couple of weeks ago now thanks to insurance I have a brand spanking new 15" MBP which just feels like it will survive me.
post #17 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Damn his presentation was better than the WWDC Keynote!!! All the jokes about making the thinnest and best office campus came true!!!

Oh Gawd, embarrassing immigrant Chinese woman (I'm half ethnic-Chinese so trust me, it's bloody embarrassing) asking for free WiFi and iPads... WTF. Apple builds the best campus in the world and their expected to give everyone in the city free WiFi and iPads?

``We think the tax revenue we bring is more than the free wifi, but we'll be glad to give you free wifi in exchange of our tax revenue.''

Classic Steve.
post #18 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Does that mean everyone will have a window view and not just some have a view of the window?

This looks stunning. I can't help but think how happy people will be working here which will mean better products due to inspiration.

Can someone give me a green card? I would like to work as a product tester. If gear can survive a month with me it's awesome. My MacBook Pro lasted 3 years with me until a couple of weeks ago now thanks to insurance I have a brand spanking new 15" MBP which just feels like it will survive me.

It'll mean that quite a few offices in between the inner and outer radii will have columns and curved/frosted partial glass you can count on that, not to mention clean rooms will be in other hidden areas.

I can imagine that Infinite Loop will really turn into the off-campus skunk works campus.
post #19 of 304
Why is there no mention of solar collectors? For a building of this size, in an area with almost year-round sunshine?
post #20 of 304
The councillors were of course just asking some due diligence questions for the sake of PR and procedure, etc... Apologies for my prior race-related comment if it was offensive.

But certainly the councillors were almost squealing like schoolgirls, how many office campuses put a smile on their face like that.

This whole thing was like William Shatner going to some Star Trek nerd's basement to help out in a scene they were recreating (ala Galaxy Quest).

You can imagine the only reason why Apple is in Cupertino is because Steve grew up there and doesn't want to move. As hinted by some of the councillors, one can only imagine what other mayors, governors and heads of states of all kinds of countries would have offered Steve. For example ILM has a Singapore office now, met a guy that just moved there from the SF Bay Area when I went on holiday to a popular Malaysian island (not too far from Singapore).
post #21 of 304
All the city council clowns could think of was to ask "where's our cut?". Apple should move to Mountain View, sell off the land, and let the remaining Cupertino residents drag the council's pathetic corpses through the streets. I'm pretty sure Mountain View's (or almost any city's) leaders would show a lot more appreciation for what Apple brings to the table.
post #22 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by The-Steve View Post

Why is there no mention of solar collectors? For a building of this size, in an area with almost year-round sunshine?

Yes, I don't think Apple should have carte blanche to do what they want just because it's already so stunning... Maybe the real questions the city council as well as the state should be asking is what about solar? There are many new office buildings around the world being built that are already "greener" than this. Yes, architect students will come to see it but it's not really an epitome of a green building.
post #23 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

All the city council clowns could think of was to ask "where's our cut?". Apple should move to Mountain View, sell off the land, and let the remaining Cupertino residents drag their pathetic corpses through the streets. I'm pretty sure Mountain View's (or almost any city's) leaders would show a lot more appreciation for what Apple brings to the table.

As I mentioned above, I'm sure there are many *governments* of countries around the world that have tried to make Steve an offer he couldn't refuse.

It's quite intriguing (and hilarious, if you will) to see how much power city councils have gained in the USA and other Western countries.

Of course, here in the developing world, it's the other extreme. Someone like Steve in this city and country wouldn't even have to show up let alone make a presentation, some lowly minion of his would "settle" anything and everything with the appropriate bureaucracy. We have so many failed "technology parks" and stuff like that lying around.
post #24 of 304
I wish I could recount some of the stories I heard about the custom architecture of the NeXT campus back in the day, but I don't have time right now.

One aspect of all that glass that I'm not fond of is the heat load from the sun. If not done properly the south-facing rooms all have their blinds drawn most of the time, and the air-conditioning becomes a huge operating cost. I would hope and assume that the architects know all this and compensate accordingly, but I would rather see something in that climate with a lot more shade overhangs.

(I've spent summers in Silicon Valley, and it typically hovers around 80-90 degrees fahrenheit for five months out of the year. Corporate architects and clients often have more design ego than brains, and I don't think Jobs, for all his accomplishments, is above this.)
post #25 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by The-Steve View Post

Why is there no mention of solar collectors? For a building of this size, in an area with almost year-round sunshine?

Because solar is still extremely inefficient. There is more power from a gas turbine than could be made with a massive array of solar panels which is actually an environmental nightmare when you're talking about so many trees.

The reflection from the panels will make those trees a ticking time bomb and I'm sure that's exactly what California needs is more risk of fire.
post #26 of 304
He's finally getting his Infinite Loop
post #27 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

I wish I could recount some of the stories I heard about the custom architecture of the NeXT campus back in the day, but I don't have time right now.

One aspect of all that glass that I'm not fond of is the heat load from the sun. If not done properly the south-facing rooms all have their blinds drawn most of the time, and the air-conditioning becomes a huge operating cost. I would hope and assume that the architects know all this and compensate accordingly, but I would rather see something in that climate with a lot more shade overhangs.

I guess that's why Apple's planting another 3000 trees on the site - some will be large enough to provide partial shade to the problem areas - after ten years or so anyway.

I also wonder if the building is architected for air flow, so that somehow the air would get cycled naturally rather than via expensive air con.

The orchards are a nice idea, in terms of returning the land to traditional use. I hope that other fruit trees are also placed on site (especially rare varieties) - nothing like employees being able to go for a walk and pick their own healthy snacks.
post #28 of 304
Since Apple said that they grow like a weed, they should eliminate all of the trees in the middle of the spaceship and grow weed there instead. It could be the world's finest weed garden, and the Apple campus would smell lovely and it would also serve as a relaxing park, unlike no others. Steve Jobs doesn't like smoking, so each office would have a personal Volcano installed. Of course, this idea wouldn't be 100% legal just yet, so perhaps in the future sometime.

As far as the design of the spaceship goes, I'm sure that it'll look nice when it's done and not too many buildings are made of huge curved glass, so it'll be unique in that regard. It is rather simplistic though in it's geometric shape, it's simply a circle with a hole in the middle of it.

Apple stores do look really cool, but the exterior designs are as minimalistic as can be. A cube in New York, a cylinder in China. Maybe I've missed this one, but do they have a pyramid somewhere yet? That has to be coming, as there are only so many simple, geometric shapes that they can choose from.

I also think that the importance of architects is sometimes overrated. Steve Jobs could have simply drawn a square on a napkin when he was eating out one day and viola, that's the amazing cube on 5th ave. The next day you draw a sphere and you have the complete design idea for the next store. The day after that you draw a circle and you have a new office complex. Don't get me wrong, I think that Apples stores look great, but I think that what makes them look special is more due to their choice of materials rather than their simple, geometric shapes. If Apple hadn't made many of their stores using primarily glass, then nobody would have cared about a cube made out of bricks.
post #29 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Yes, I don't think Apple should have carte blanche to do what they want just because it's already so stunning... Maybe the real questions the city council as well as the state should be asking is what about solar? There are many new office buildings around the world being built that are already "greener" than this. Yes, architect students will come to see it but it's no Guggenheim or [insert really cool epitome of a green building]. It is as understated as it is elegant.

Did you watch the entire presentation?

Do you realize the 'green' efforts and accomplishments that Steve has lead Apple to achieve?

Is your home solar powered?

Quote:
There are many other aspects that can affect the efficiency of your panels. We find the following to be the most common: how often you clean them, are they infrared, how much sun do they get and how hot do they get. It is a surprise to many people that for most panels their efficiency drops when the temperature starts to go above 25 Deg Celsius (77F) .

http://www.solarpowerfast.com/build-...-solar-energy/
post #30 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


I also think that the importance of architects is sometimes overrated. Steve Jobs could have simply drawn a square on a napkin when he was eating out one day and viola, that's the amazing cube on 5th ave. The next day you draw a sphere and you have the complete design idea for the next store. The day after that you draw a circle and you have a new office complex. Don't get me wrong, I think that Apples stores look great, but I think that what makes them look special is more due to their choice of materials rather than their simple, geometric shapes. If Apple hadn't made many of their stores using primarily glass, then nobody would have cared about a cube made out of bricks.

Perhaps if you had training in architecture, or at least grade 6 math, you would know the difference between a sphere and a cylinder.
post #31 of 304
The powers of medicinal marijuana! Go Steve.
post #32 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Yes, I don't think Apple should have carte blanche to do what they want just because it's already so stunning... Maybe the real questions the city council as well as the state should be asking is what about solar? There are many new office buildings around the world being built that are already "greener" than this. Yes, architect students will come to see it but it's not really an epitome of a green building.

Well, if this was supposed to be a city council meeting to approve the construction, I think it sounded like approval was unanimous. These councilors couldn't have been more obsequious if they had tried. So yes, Jobs pretty much got carte blanche.
post #33 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwik View Post

The powers of medicinal marijuana! Go Steve.

Yeah, growing like weed indeed.
post #34 of 304
I dont understand the questions of residents gains and free WiFi? Sorry I am not American.

I read some of your comment and I still dont understand. Please Lighten up on things.

Do the council have the power to say no? And why would they say no?

I didnt watch the video yet. I hope it was a joke. It seems Jobs was threatening them who is in charge, who is more powerful and who pays their salary.
post #35 of 304
From the map in the article, and the schematics provided, it looks like Apple has purchased more land alongside the eastern side of their 2006 and 2010 purchases - the white building in the corner of the 2006 purchase, and a strip of land to the east of N. Tantau Ave.
post #36 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Perhaps if you had training in architecture, or at least grade 6 math, you would know the difference between a sphere and a cylinder.

You're right, I don't have any training in architecture, as that is not my field. And you're also right that I did mix up sphere with cylinder, and the store in China is of course a cylinder.
post #37 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

then nobody would have cared about a cube made out of bricks.

Cube made of bricks can be beautiful if done right. You have no idea what you're talking about.
post #38 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksec View Post

I dont understand the questions of residents gains and free WiFi? Sorry I am not American.

It's in California, a lot of commies and liberals live there. They were looking for free handouts.
post #39 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by halhiker View Post

And the apartment complex in the corner is not for sale?

Can you say eminent domain for Cupertino's largest taxpayer?

I think that's pretty dangerous, to use government power to take property, purely to benefit a single corporation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Because solar is still extremely inefficient. There is more power from a gas turbine than could be made with a massive array of solar panels which is actually an environmental nightmare when you're talking about so many trees.

The reflection from the panels will make those trees a ticking time bomb and I'm sure that's exactly what California needs is more risk of fire.

If the panels are facing _up_, how is that going to reflect down to the trees? Or if they're motorized to be sun-pointing, the light vector is pointed back at the sun again. Assuming the panels are on the roof, I'm not seeing where it hurts the trees here.
post #40 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Well, if this was supposed to be a city council meeting to approve the construction, I think it sounded like approval was unanimous. These councilors couldn't have been more obsequious if they had tried. So yes, Jobs pretty much got carte blanche.


At the Cupertino City Council, they ought to treat him like Jesus. He just proposed an environmental improvement, a sensitive architecture landmark and 12,000 jobs?!
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