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Space Shuttle Columbia Explodes over Texas

post #1 of 278
Thread Starter 
My God. Is anyone else watching this? Check any news site for more info. Sounds like it crashed in Texas.

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: Fran441 ]</p>
post #2 of 278
Thread Starter 
<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/02/01/shuttle.landing.ap/index.html" target="_blank">http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/02/01/shuttle.landing.ap/index.html</a>

NASA lost contact at 9 AM EST and the video shows multiple objects falling down towards Earth.
post #3 of 278
All I've seen is little bits of debris streaming down... they are just looping the same 40 seconds of video here.

NASA is telling everyone in Texas not to touch any debris they may find. Does not look good.



[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: murbot ]</p>
post #4 of 278
I am watching right now...
post #5 of 278
I am watching now.

The analysts I have heard have not yet said whether there is any chance of the crew surviving. Does anyone know if the crew area is in a separate capsule that could stay intact on a break-up?

Our thoughts and prayers are with the crew and their families.
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post #6 of 278
it is horribly sad...i still remember challenger so clearly...my thoughts and prays go out to the families...g

thankfully apple has changed their front page image to the powerbooks...
it's all fun till somebody loses an eye
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it's all fun till somebody loses an eye
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post #7 of 278
Oh my... how terrible.

Hopefully this is not connected to terrorism in any way. (With the israeli being onboard.)

I wonder how Bush will handle this?
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Bill Bradley to comedian Bill Cosby: "Bill, you are a comic, tell us a joke!"
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post #8 of 278
I can't find the words. Just horrible.

It's 2:35 in the AM here, and I just checked slashdot. "I bet there'll be another disaster" I thought before the page loaded.

It's not shaping up to be a great millenium

Barto

PS I think this means NASA is finished

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: Barto ]</p>
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Self Indulgent Experiments keep me occupied.

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post #9 of 278
[quote] PS I think this means NASA is finished <hr></blockquote>

it is awful and very sad, but NASA finished?? Space flight and space exploration is inherently very dangerous...challenger was what 17 years ago? (seems much sooner, but some things stay fresh in your mind)...the number of people lost by NASA is actually quite low for how dangerous the job is....of course any people lost is too many....but many more people have died trying to climb mount everest than have died flying through space and landing on the moon....g

again, our thoughts are on the families, i wish them the strenght to withstand this tragedy....it would be very hard on me if a loved one was on board....
it's all fun till somebody loses an eye
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it's all fun till somebody loses an eye
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post #10 of 278
This really really really sucks.......
post #11 of 278
This was no terrorist attack. There's no grounds for it. 200,000 feet altitude is much too high for a surface to air missle, and there is no way an astronaut...Israeli or otherwise would ever do such a thing. One of the astronauts on board is from my hometown in Wisconsin, so we are feeling the shock here pretty bad. This could be any number of things. Several tiles could have shaken loose from the bottom of the shuttle's heat shield and that could have cause the intense heat of reentry to break through the hull and ignite existing fuel. There could have been any number of possibilities. But one thing is for sure...the shuttle program is grounded for at least a year or two if not for good. The fleet is just too old and in too much disrepair to keep flying...it is unfortunate that it takes a disaster like this to make people realize it. I believe we will see an entirely new shuttle or a new fleet before we see another shuttle launch. This is unfornutate because I used to watch them take-off and land and it was always such a beautiful sight. This is a sad day without a doubt...
post #12 of 278
i wonder if they're going to keep insisiting on going with the lowest bidder on all these projects now.



terrible.
post #13 of 278
[quote]Originally posted by Barto:
<strong>PS I think this means NASA is finished
[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: Barto ]</strong><hr></blockquote>

I disagree.

There have been accidents before. There will be accidents again. As a comparison, think how many lives have been lost in civil aviation over the years. There are still accidents these days, but aviation - on a percentage basis - is safer than it has ever been (safer than driving your car).

We honour the dead. We learn from mistakes. We carry on.

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: Chinney ]</p>
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tribalfusion?
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post #14 of 278
[quote]Originally posted by Chinney:
<strong>I am watching now.

The analysts I have heard have not yet said whether there is any chance of the crew surviving. Does anyone know if the crew area is in a separate capsule that could stay intact on a break-up?

Our thoughts and prayers are with the crew and their families.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Unfortunately, the crew is not in a separate capsule to the best of my knowledge. There really isn't any way to survive what happened.

This is really shocking and I'm very saddened. Although there will always be conspiracy theories about terrorism because of the Isreali astronaut on board... I think this is just a result of a very aging fleet. The shuttles are 20+ years old. Watching the cnn.com scroll thingy at the bottom of the screen said something about debris hitting the shuttle during launch, and some sort of insulating foam falling off the shuttle's exterior. I think after this the rest of the fleet will be grounded or severely overhauled, and massive shifts in funding will be made towards the new shuttles being developed.

And, I don't think this is the end of NASA. It bounced back after Challenger, it will bounce back after this. I'm sorry, but you have to take risks in the name of science and exploration in space.

Sorry for the lengthy post... NASA/space/astronomy is just a very sensitive topic for me.

My thoughts and prayers go out to the families of those who were lost today.
post #15 of 278
they were interviewing one of the astronauts who was saying that this was the heaviest lander ever, because they'd be carrying so much stuff back with them.

i wonder if they'll ever figure out what happened. do space shuttles have flight recorders?


edit: i wonder if this will lead to some way of keeping that high speed debris out of the way while launching. that wouldn't surprise me if losing that insulation while launcing didn't cause problems until landing.

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: alcimedes ]</p>
post #16 of 278
I was just flipping through channels and when I came to Fox News I saw this. It's so horrible.

My thoughts and prayers to their family memebers.
post #17 of 278
One of few times that you get chills down your spine watching the news. Ground control to nobody, it appears. Quite heavy stuff, all this. Poor bastards. <img src="embarrassed.gif" border="0">
post #18 of 278
All I could think was: Not again.

My prayers for the families of the astronauts.

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: SDW2001 ]</p>
I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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I can only please one person per day.  Today is not your day.  Tomorrow doesn't look good either.  
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post #19 of 278
they still haven't changed the <a href="http://www.apple.com/powermac/" target="_blank">powermac</a> site nor random images of 20" lcd at Apple...does anybody know how to get in touch with apple?? even if they can't change the image, perhaps a short memorial? g


edit...gone now

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: thegelding ]</p>
it's all fun till somebody loses an eye
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it's all fun till somebody loses an eye
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post #20 of 278
[quote]Originally posted by thegelding:
<strong>they still haven't changed the <a href="http://www.apple.com/powermac/" target="_blank">powermac</a> site nor random images of 20" lcd at Apple...does anybody know how to get in touch with apple?? even if they can't change the image, perhaps a short memorial? g</strong><hr></blockquote>

they changed them and removed them.... ichecked about a a half hour ago and they just had one remaining and now i cant find it. takes time

edit: ah... that one on the main powermac page is apparently still there.. it wasnt showing up for me anymore for a while

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: applenut ]</p>
post #21 of 278
I completely agree that Nasa's "faster, cheaper, better" policy is probably going to come to an end. HOPEFULLY if any good can come from this, our government will start funding NASA to the levels it needs.

I wonder if they will relaunch the shuttle replacement program, venture star or whatever it was called.

It truly is so sad... I can only imagine what the families of the crew are going through right now.
GO HOKIES!!
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GO HOKIES!!
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post #22 of 278
Very sad day when good people like these die.

Frank_t
post #23 of 278
well, there will definitely be another space shuttle mission within months..... they need to get the people at the space station down afterall.
post #24 of 278
I sure hope it doesn't mean the end of NASA, or the end of shuttle flights. There are three astronauts up there at the space station who would probably like to come home someday.

[edit: yeah applenut beat me to this point... ]

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: OBJRA10 ]</p>
post #25 of 278
I guess that's true. Maybe they'll take a Russian pod down. With unknown failures on the shuttle it might be safer.


Anyway very sad news. Just goes to show that space flight is still "rocker science".
post #26 of 278
[quote]Originally posted by OBJRA10:
<strong>I sure hope it doesn't mean the end of NASA, or the end of shuttle flights. There are three astronauts up there at the space station who would probably like to come home someday.

[edit: yeah applenut beat me to this point... ]

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: OBJRA10 ]</strong><hr></blockquote>

Well, isn't there a Soyuz escape pod that they could use? I know that it's case of some sort of catastrophic emergency on the station, but who knows what's going to happen in the aftermath of this. I should know if the ISS has one or not... someone please enlighten me.

(edit: well, to answer my own question.. here's a quote from some russian space official found on cnn.com:
But, he added, should there be a decision to evacuate astronauts from the space station, they would be able to leave in the Soyuz Transport Module, which is parked there.)

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: ironchef82 ]</p>
post #27 of 278
i just cant imagine NASA not going on with the ISS work/construction. Will they really just let it sit there?


i haven't been keeping up with what's coming next.... what are the current plans/proposals for a shuttle replacement? is one in the works?

one would think in 20+ years that there have been a ton of technological advancements that would make any replacement far superior and safer
post #28 of 278
This is truely a sad situation. Whatever the cause is, the shuttle missions have been amazing as far as a safety track record...until now?

My sympathies go to the shuttle crew and their families.

One point, to all the morons who think that these people in NASA's history of acheivements are a hoax...this is a real endeavor for us to explore space and acheive things that only others can dream of...and this sadly is the price sometimes for this experience.

It is real. We will prevail.

But what a horrible time for this to happen. I'm quite heartbroken...that's all I can say right now. <img src="graemlins/oyvey.gif" border="0" alt="[oyvey]" />
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post #29 of 278
Wow, I just turned on the TV and saw all this. Hard to even imagine.



My thoughts are with the families. And may the brave crew rest in peace.

Some of these real-life disasters are getting a little TOO movie-like for my taste: September 11 and now this.

Sigh...
post #30 of 278
So, so sad. I can still remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when the Challenger exploded due to the faulty 'O-ring'. The image of the forked smoke trail the rockets made flying away from each other will forever be burned in my mind. My thoughts and prayers go out to all of the families and friends of these brave people.
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It's just an object. It doesn't mean what you think.
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post #31 of 278
I found a website with the first picture of debris that I've seen.

<a href="http://www.dailysentinel.com/" target="_blank">http://www.dailysentinel.com/</a>
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post #32 of 278
Just thought I'd share the text of Reagan's speech after Challenger... quite eloquent and comforting on a day like this...

---------------------------
Ladies and gentlemen, I'd planned to speak to you tonight to report on the state of the union, but the events of earlier today have led me to change those plans. Today is a day for mourning and remembering. Nancy and I are pained to the core by the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger. We know we share this pain with all of the people of our country. This is truly a national loss.

Nineteen years ago, almost to the day, we lost three astronauts in a terrible accident on the ground. But we've never lost an astronaut in flight; we've never had a tragedy like this. And perhaps we've forgotten the courage it took for the crew of the shuttle; but they, the Challenger Seven, were aware of the dangers, but overcame them and did their jobs brilliantly. We mourn seven heroes: Michael Smith, Dick Scobee, Judith Resnik, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Gregory Jarvis, and Christa McAuliffe. We mourn their loss as a nation together.

For the families of the seven, we cannot bear, as you do, the full impact of this tragedy. But we feel the loss, and we're thinking about you so very much. Your loved ones were daring and brave, and they had that special grace, that special spirit that says, "Give me a challenge and I'll meet it with joy." They had a hunger to explore the universe and discover its truths. They wished to serve, and they did. They served all of us.

We've grown used to wonders in this century. It's hard to dazzle us. But for 25 years the United States space program has been doing just that. We've grown used to the idea of space, and perhaps we forget that we've only just begun. We're still pioneers. They, the members of the Challenger crew, were pioneers.

And I want to say something to the school children of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttle's takeoff. I know it is hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen. It's all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It's all part of taking a chance and expanding man's horizons. The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the brave. The Challenger crew was pulling us into the future, and we'll continue to follow them.

I've always had great faith in and respect for our space program, and what happened today does nothing to diminish it. We don't hide our space program. We don't keep secrets and cover things up. We do it all up front and in public. That's the way freedom is, and we wouldn't change it for a minute. We'll continue our quest in space. There will be more shuttle flights and more shuttle crews and yes, more volunteers, more civilians, more teachers in space. Nothing ends here; our hopes and our journeys continue.

I want to add that I wish I could talk to every man and woman who works for NASA or who worked on this mission and tell them: "Your dedication and professionalism have moved and impressed us for decades. And we know of your anguish. We share it."

There's a coincidence today. On this day 390 years ago, the great explorer Sir Francis Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama. In his lifetime the great frontiers were the oceans, and a historian later said, "He lived by the sea, died on it, and was buried in it." Well, today we can say of the Challenger crew: Their dedication was, like Drake's, complete.

The crew of the space shuttle Challenger honored us by the manner in which they lived their lives. We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for their journey and waved good-bye and "slipped the surly bonds of earth" to "touch the face of God."

------------------

Farewell, Columbia. May your crew rest in peace.
post #33 of 278
Just incredible...sad.
post #34 of 278
[quote]Originally posted by alcimedes:
<strong>i wonder if they'll ever figure out what happened. do space shuttles have flight recorders?</strong><hr></blockquote>
CNN was reporting that NASA said they picked up six seconds of data from the space shuttle during its explosion. The data contains important shuttle information and the astronaut body information/vitals. That will help figure out what happened.
post #35 of 278
To CNN Talking Head:

1) 12,500 mph != Mach 6. Not even for very large values of 6.

2) Radar does not detect heat.

3) What the radar weather picked up wasn't the *debris*, you twit, but the *contrail* left over as it drifted over Louisiana.


You know, it's such obvious screwups like this that make me distrust anything these idiots say on any topic. God.
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post #36 of 278
[quote]Originally posted by Chinney:
<strong>The analysts I have heard have not yet said whether there is any chance of the crew surviving. Does anyone know if the crew area is in a separate capsule that could stay intact on a break-up?</strong><hr></blockquote>

The crew are not in a separate capsule. But, they should be wearing partially pressurized suits equipped with a parachute during re-entry. However, the chances of them surviving an incident at this altitude and under those extreme conditions is highly unlikely.
post #37 of 278
[quote]Originally posted by Kickaha:
<strong>To CNN Talking Head:

1) 12,500 mph != Mach 6. Not even for very large values of 6.

2) Radar does not detect heat.

3) What the radar weather picked up wasn't the *debris*, you twit, but the *contrail* left over as it drifted over Louisiana.


You know, it's such obvious screwups like this that make me distrust anything these idiots say on any topic. God.</strong><hr></blockquote>

i believe that all must have come from a single source since NBC repeated all three of those "screwups"
post #38 of 278
Take a look at these links (from ArsTechnica)!
<a href="http://weather.noaa.gov/radar/latest/DS.p19r0/si.kfws.shtml" target="_blank">National Weather Service Radar Image - Dallas/Fort Worth, TX</a>
<a href="http://weather.noaa.gov/radar/latest/DS.p19r0/si.kshv.shtml" target="_blank">National Weather Service Radar Image - Shreveport, LA</a>

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: King Chung Huang ]</p>
post #39 of 278


[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: Samantha Joanne Ollendale ]</p>
Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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post #40 of 278
oops... double post, apologies

[ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: Samantha Joanne Ollendale ]</p>
Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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