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BBC developing iOS app for mobile reporting

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
The BBC, a pioneer in bringing on-demand programming to iOS users, is now leveraging Apple's mobile platform to build a client app to allow reporters to upload images, audio and video using an iPhone or iPad.

According to a report by Journalism.co.uk, the new app will even enable the broadcaster's journalists to report live from their iOS devices over 3G mobile data networks.

The app is expected to be available in about a month. Martin Turner, the BBC's head of newsgathering operations, told the site that the new iOS app was "a logical extension of what the BBC can do already" but noted that it was a "significant development" and that the capability to file live reports from mobile devices "is a really important one."

Speaking of Apple's iPhone, Turner said "we are using it at the moment because it offers us the best combination of features, but it is not the only solution," and added that the BBC was "not wedded to the iPhone."

While a variety of networks have made available iOS apps to enable citizen reporting, the BBC appears to be the first broadcaster to commission an app for its own reporters to use. Other reporters have already begun using the iPhone and iPad to file their reports however.

The BBC was also the first broadcaster to aggressively move to adopt Apple's recommended H.264 video on iOS devices, beginning with its iPlayer app for iOS apps in early 2008. Prior to that, the BBC and most other commercial content providers on the web were reliant upon Adobe Flash to make such videos available.

post #2 of 14
Crikey - at this rate Aunty Beeb will try to charge me a license fee for my iPhone.
post #3 of 14
Curious there has been so much responsiveness for Apple-related technologies from the BBC in recent times as for what seemed like many years the BBC declined to stream content using QuickTime (even after it was adopted as the basis of the MPEG4-related ISO standard) and thereby effectively limited Mac and then iOS users access to various content. For a public service broadcaster in particular, it was never quite clear why that was. These new developments are therefore most welcome.
post #4 of 14
Interesting that AppleInsider decided to omit the rest of the interview, where he said:

Quote:
"Smart phones and portable devices are a crucial part of that, but we are not wedded to the iPhone by any means, it is just one option. We are using it at the moment because it offers us the best combination of features, but it is not the only solution."

Also, how will they get the application on to the reporters' phones? Presumably the application would either be in the App Store (unlikely) or every phone would have to be registered in the developer program. Either way, a lot more cumbersome and restricted than a similar application would be on another platform. Not to mention the lack of a physical keyboard that would slow down their ability to file text reports.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Crikey - at this rate Aunty Beeb will try to charge me a license fee for my iPhone.

Some iPhone applications do require a licence fee (if they are used while your phone is plugged in to a power source). Any application that can display live TV requires the fee to be paid, which is currently £145.50 per year.
post #5 of 14
In iWeb when you use the Gallery Widget on a page to create a window to an album on your MobileMe Gallery, you must use Flash to see the content. Maybe that's why Apple is reportedly killing iWeb? Easier to do that than make it work without Flash? A living embarrassment?
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13

Also, how will they get the application on to the reporters' phones? Presumably the application would either be in the App Store (unlikely) or every phone would have to be registered in the developer program.

In fact all they need to do (unless they do make it more widely available on the app store) is to produce it as a BBC-developed app and enable its upload to any BBC-registered iDevice, which almost any organisation can do for its own iDevices.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

In iWeb when you use the Gallery Widget on a page to create a window to an album on your MobileMe Gallery, you must use Flash to see the content. Maybe that's why Apple is reportedly killing iWeb? Easier to do that than make it work without Flash? A living embarrassment?

MobileMe's me.com site has used Adobe Flash from day one to a small extent to interact with the file system to upload files.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Interesting that AppleInsider decided to omit the rest of the interview, where he said:

Apparently you can't read...

Quote:
Speaking of Apple's iPhone, Turner said "we are using it at the moment because it offers us the best combination of features, but it is not the only solution," and added that the BBC was "not wedded to the iPhone."
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Also, how will they get the application on to the reporters' phones? Presumably the application would either be in the App Store (unlikely) or every phone would have to be registered in the developer program. Either way, a lot more cumbersome and restricted than a similar application would be on another platform.

And are also woefully uninformed....

Apple has tools for enterprise level deployment of apps, which allow you to freely deploy apps within your enterprise outside of the App Store.

Enterprise Deployment

Quote:
And it's easy to scale your iPhone deployment with Mobile Device Management and Wireless App Distribution for in-house apps.
post #10 of 14
I bet the '>Click' team won't be using them. They are a bunch of PCs...

Enterprises can develop their own app and deploy them in any manner they want within their organisation. It is a well known feature. Start reading...
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Interesting that AppleInsider decided to omit the rest of the interview, where he said:

Probably because it was redundant: "not wedded to the iPhone."


Quote:
Either way, a lot more cumbersome and restricted than a similar application would be on another platform.

How so? Which other platform is less cumbersome?

Quote:
Not to mention the lack of a physical keyboard that would slow down their ability to file text reports.

For those who struggle with the touch keyboard there is the wireless keyboard which doesn't add any significant bulk - still much easier than carrying even a macbook air.
"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
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"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
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post #12 of 14
Say what you want about the beeb, they are well ahead in a lot of content, including it integration.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by neiltc13 View Post

Interesting that AppleInsider decided to omit the rest of the interview, where he said:



Also, how will they get the application on to the reporters' phones? Presumably the application would either be in the App Store (unlikely) or every phone would have to be registered in the developer program. Either way, a lot more cumbersome and restricted than a similar application would be on another platform. Not to mention the lack of a physical keyboard that would slow down their ability to file text reports.

I don't understand why these people here. They always see Apple in bad light yet they wasted their time here. :sigh:
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbow View Post

Curious there has been so much responsiveness for Apple-related technologies from the BBC in recent times as for what seemed like many years the BBC declined to stream content using QuickTime (even after it was adopted as the basis of the MPEG4-related ISO standard) and thereby effectively limited Mac and then iOS users access to various content. For a public service broadcaster in particular, it was never quite clear why that was. These new developments are therefore most welcome.

I imagine it was because back then Ashley Highfield was director of New Media & Technology. And what does Ashley do now? Oh, He's the MD of Microsoft UK. Funny that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashley_Highfield
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