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Adobe adds support for building iOS apps with Flash Builder, Flex

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 
Adobe this week released Flash Builder 4.5 and Flex 4.5, adding the ability to build and distribute iPhone, iPad and iPod touch applications on Apple's official App Store.

The new functionality was announced on the company's official blog, where Adobe Product Marketing Manager Puneet Goel revealed that App Store software could be created "using one tool chain, programming language and code base -- a first for developers."

The support for iOS applications comes in addition to the ability to create software for Research in Motion's BlackBerry PlayBook tablet, also new features of Flash Builder and Flex 4.5. Initially, application support was only available for Android software.

Flash Platform evangelist Serge Jespers demonstrated the ability of Flash Builder 4.5 and Flex 4.5 to build iOS software in a video accompanying the post. The same stock market tracking application was shown running on an iPad 2 and iPod touch, in addition to an Android-powered HTC smartphone and the BlackBerry PlayBook.

Jespers also showed off the ability of Adobe's software to allow developers to quickly created tabbed applications, or add features like automatically rotating between portrait and landscape mode. By checking the appropriate boxes, developers can easily export their mobile software for Apple's iOS alongside BlackBerry Tablet OS and Google Android.

A "Platform Settings" option also allows developers to select their target device when creating iOS software. Through this, software can be created specifically for the smaller screen sizes of the iPhone and iPod touch, the larger 9.7-inch display of the iPad, or both.

"When your application is ready, you don't actually have to build the application separately for every single platform," Jespers said. "You can actually do that in one code. It's pretty amazing."

Flash 4.5 and Flex 4.5 are offered as standalone products for developers to purchase, or are available through Creative Suite 5.5 Web Premium and Master Collection.

"The reaction from developers to the new mobile capabilities in Flash Builder 4.5 and the Flex 4.5 framework has been absolutely fantastic," said Ed Rowe, vice president of developer tooling, Adobe. "They are amazed by how easy it is to create great mobile apps for Android devices, BlackBerry PlayBook, iPhone and iPad. Companies can now effectively reach their customers no matter what type of device they have."



Last September, Apple revised its policy on third-party development tools for iOS, and decided it would allow developers to use tools like Adobe's in order to create software made available to download on the App Store. That was a change from an earlier policy, when Apple's iOS 4 software development kid license banned tools that would port applications from Flash, Java and Mono.

Controversy over Apple's decision prompted CEO Steve Jobs to pen a letter in which he explained that allowing Flash conversion tools would produce "sub-standard apps" for the iPhone and iPad, hindering the progress of the iOS platform. Jobs said at the time that it was known from "painful experience" that allowing developers to become dependent on third-party tools is restrictive.

"We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers," Jobs said in April 2010.

Though Flash remains banned on iOS devices, Adobe has continued to expand its support for the iPhone and iPad, and this march released a Flash-to-HTML5 conversion tool. The "experimental" software called "Wallaby" allows for Adobe Flash Professional files with the .fla extension to be converted to an HTML format that can be opened in the Mobile Safari browser on iOS devices.
post #2 of 44

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #3 of 44
1. ANOTHER programming language I have to learn? I don't care how easy it is... No thanks, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

2. Can this Adobe development system that can create apps for various mobile devices also create a conventional website in the same build step as just another target?
post #4 of 44
I'd love to hear from Flash && iOS developers that can tell me 1) If this is pretty doing a Flash app to create an IOS app, 2) the quality of the code it creates, and 3) if it's just better to use Obj-C/Xcode to create your iOS apps.
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post #5 of 44
The only thing I can say about this is: big meh

Flash tools for cross-platform applications have been available on PC's and Macs for decades, but the only things they are used for are banners, obnoxious websites, animations, and silly games that 9 out of 10 times also have a native version. For games, alternatives like Unity and Corona already exist that are much cheaper for developers.

Who exactly is waiting for tools like this, except lazy developers who think they can get away with substandard applications that perform mediocre on every platform, instead of trying to go the extra mile and make applications the perform outstanding on some?

Adobe is realling clinging to every last straw to keep their 'write once, deploy everywhere' development tools going, but if history teaches us anything, it's that developers don't actually mind all that much porting their games or sticking to one or two platforms.
post #6 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

Doesn't matter. Apps made with this crap will be rejected due to poor functionality. Steve doesn't sell crap in his store, and every app made like this is going to be crap.

Nope, they'll go through like the tens of thousands of directly-ported Flash games before them.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #7 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

Doesn't matter. Apps made with this crap will be rejected due to poor functionality. Steve doesn't sell crap in his store, and every app made like this is going to be crap.

They won't need to be so heavy handed because they've already dodged the bullet here. The concern was that iOS development would be dominated by crappy x-platform tools that produced ugly non-optimized experience and left people feeling that iPhone/iPad software was crappy. So they banned those tools and developers got stuck in and learned how to code for iOS.

Now there is a huge population of developers who can work natively with iOS and a big population of high-quality iOS native products. So now if you release a fugly piece of drek it won't reflect badly on Apple & iPhone, it will reflect badly on you as a software house - whereas back in 2008 it could have been the other way around.

Still I'd say it's a safe bet you won't be winning featured app status if you choose to use these sort of tools!
post #8 of 44
Can someone tell me what's the difference between Flash Builder 4.5 and Flex 4.5?
post #9 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post

Can someone tell me what's the difference between Flash Builder 4.5 and Flex 4.5?

The Flex 4.5 SDK is a free and open source compiler, published by Adobe, which produces files that can run on the Flash run-time engine.

Flash Builder 4.5 is a proprietary IDE, which uses the Flex 4.5 SDK at its heart, along with some additional proprietary plugins and a visual design interface to streamline and accelerate the development process.

Their relationship is sort of like the relationship between LLVM/GCC and XCode.

In the background, the Adobe AIR platform includes a runtime for running Flash content on an iOS device. Applications built using the Flex 4.5 SDK can be statically linked with a copy of the Adobe AIR runtime, in order to produce standalone Apps that are can be installed and executed on iOS devices. This process can either be carried out by hand using free (but proprietary) command line tools, or else you can automate the process (somewhat) using Flash Builder.
post #10 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

Doesn't matter. Apps made with this crap will be rejected due to poor functionality. Steve doesn't sell crap in his store, and every app made like this is going to be crap.

I hate to break the news to you, but Steve Jobs does allow crap apps in his store. I'm glancing at the App Store right now and it's filled with numerous non-functional, blatant copyright infringing, and terrible apps.

I think every week a new Dunt Hunt game is released on the App Store that rips the sprites and sounds directly from the NES game and barely functions. Or fake apps like Future Baby Face that seem to be a random image generator that took probably all of a few minutes to write. Some of the apps seem to be minimally functional merely to generate ad revenue.
post #11 of 44
post #12 of 44
My quick QA test will be the portrait-to-landscape rotation. Someone please post a video as soon as possible; I want to see how jerky it is.
post #13 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'd love to hear from Flash && iOS developers that can tell me 1) If this is pretty doing a Flash app to create an IOS app, 2) the quality of the code it creates, and 3) if it's just better to use Obj-C/Xcode to create your iOS apps.

One shouldn't use Flash and quality in the same sentence...
post #14 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'd love to hear from Flash && iOS developers that can tell me 1) If this is pretty doing a Flash app to create an IOS app, 2) the quality of the code it creates, and 3) if it's just better to use Obj-C/Xcode to create your iOS apps.

this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHosLhPEN3k
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post #15 of 44
just because it allow you to create a program that runs on the various OS platforms does not mean your program will actually work correctly on the all the various hardware from all the different manufactures.

The Biggest negative feed back you see on most Android app is it does not work on someone particular hardware. Unless developers are willing to invest money on all the various hardware platforms and test their code on them it just going to be a lot more of the same bad experience.

I think Adobe is just going to accelerate the death of these other platforms as developers get tire of hearing their program does not work on everything
post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by lfmorrison View Post

The Flex 4.5 SDK is a free and open source compiler, published by Adobe, which produces files that can run on the Flash run-time engine. ...

Thank you very much for the detailed answer. Appreciated.

I thought Adobe changed all references of Flex to Flash Builder, but now I understand better.
post #17 of 44
I've been a Flex developer for almost 5 years now. Flex Builder 4.5.1 is a really big deal. Here's why...


1) Those that blame the Flash platform for cpu use, battery drain, jerky UIs, etc don't understand the difference between a platform and an implementation. That many flash applications cause high cpu usage, or a quick battery drain, is not the same as flash being a bad platform. It simply means that a single flash app is not well written. The root of the issue is that the Flash platform is so easy to use and publish with, that many in-experienced developers produce untested flash apps, which gives the platform a bad name.

I could write a C++ or Java program that's just as inefficient as a badly written Flash app. The difference is that it's much more difficult for a non-developer to produce a C++ or Java app, so that rarely happens.

I write enterprise flash apps that are indistinguishable from native apps. It takes a lot of effort, but has many benefits.


2) Well written Flash/Air desktop apps can now be ported to mobile devices quickly. And not just one specific type of mobile device, but several platforms of them. In the past month I've ported 3 very large enterprise Flex based UIs to mobile devices, and the results are fantastic.

Large companies, and software developers that cater to them, have absolutely no desire to learn each individual platform. The rate at which mobile and desktop platforms change is far beyond the ability to a single large organization to keep up. Adobe Air (Flash Desktop) allows these companies to divorce themselves from the platform wars, and ensure that they're future proofing their current software projects.

3) Within the next year, you will see a dramatic drop in platform specific developer job listings at large companies. The Flash platform, and others like it, prove that there is no reason for an enterprise to produce an app for just one platform any more. Instead, the ability to write a single code base and deploy across multiple architectures will be the standard for enterprise work.

4) Within the next five years, Adobe AIR will become the standard for writing cross platform enterprise apps. Using one code base, developers will produce applications for Mac OSX, Windows, iOS devices, Android, and Blackberry.
post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildag View Post

3) Within the next year, you will see a dramatic drop in platform specific developer job listings at large companies. The Flash platform, and others like it, prove that there is no reason for an enterprise to produce an app for just one platform any more. Instead, the ability to write a single code base and deploy across multiple architectures will be the standard for enterprise work.

4) Within the next five years, Adobe AIR will become the standard for writing cross platform enterprise apps. Using one code base, developers will produce applications for Mac OSX, Windows, iOS devices, Android, and Blackberry.

Agreed with much of what you said. For example, video games and related utilities are making use of Adobe Flash and the Qt Framework for accelerating cross-platform UI development. StarCraft II and Street Fighter IV both make use of Flash for their UI.
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildag View Post

I've been a Flex developer for almost 5 years now. Flex Builder 4.5.1 is a really big deal. Here's why...


1) Those that blame the Flash platform for cpu use, battery drain, jerky UIs, etc don't understand the difference between a platform and an implementation. That many flash applications cause high cpu usage, or a quick battery drain, is not the same as flash being a bad platform. It simply means that a single flash app is not well written. The root of the issue is that the Flash platform is so easy to use and publish with, that many in-experienced developers produce untested flash apps, which gives the platform a bad name.

I could write a C++ or Java program that's just as inefficient as a badly written Flash app. The difference is that it's much more difficult for a non-developer to produce a C++ or Java app, so that rarely happens.

I write enterprise flash apps that are indistinguishable from native apps. It takes a lot of effort, but has many benefits.


2) Well written Flash/Air desktop apps can now be ported to mobile devices quickly. And not just one specific type of mobile device, but several platforms of them. In the past month I've ported 3 very large enterprise Flex based UIs to mobile devices, and the results are fantastic.

Large companies, and software developers that cater to them, have absolutely no desire to learn each individual platform. The rate at which mobile and desktop platforms change is far beyond the ability to a single large organization to keep up. Adobe Air (Flash Desktop) allows these companies to divorce themselves from the platform wars, and ensure that they're future proofing their current software projects.

3) Within the next year, you will see a dramatic drop in platform specific developer job listings at large companies. The Flash platform, and others like it, prove that there is no reason for an enterprise to produce an app for just one platform any more. Instead, the ability to write a single code base and deploy across multiple architectures will be the standard for enterprise work.

4) Within the next five years, Adobe AIR will become the standard for writing cross platform enterprise apps. Using one code base, developers will produce applications for Mac OSX, Windows, iOS devices, Android, and Blackberry.

99.9% of these "enterprise" apps would be better served via HTML based services.

I don't know how many times I have seen people come in and pitch Flash/Flex apps instead HTML based web apps when Flash/Flex is not needed.

You remind me of the developers who came up with the banner ad at the top of this page. Sweet, a Flash banner ad that displays a static image.
post #20 of 44
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post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

99.9% of these "enterprise" apps would be better served via HTML based services.

I don't know how many times I have seen people come in and pitch Flash/Flex apps instead HTML based web apps when Flash/Flex is not needed.

You remind me of the developers who came up with the banner ad at the top of this page. Sweet, a Flash banner ad that displays a static image.

Except you're wrong.

I reject requests for work that doesn't need Flash all the time. In fact, I just turned down two projects that weren't good fits.

There are MANY enterprise apps that are excellent fits for Flash. There are MANY that CAN'T be done in HTML. Flash has many features that HTML can't match...


Byte level data manipulation, read/write any data format
Hardware accelerated graphics
Compiled code with all of the benefits (faster, strongly typed, better frameworks)
Socket level communications (TCP, UDP, IP Multicast, etc)
Bit level memory format encoded data object communications protocol (AMF)
Remote Objects
True server side push (Not just long poll HTTP)
Multicast audio client and server
Direct video camera and microphone access


And the Flex SDK is light years beyond any Javascript framework for enterprise data visualization.

I don't make ads. I don't make anything that blinks or attempts to sell. I make applications that help large companies understand their data.
post #22 of 44
deleted
post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildag View Post

Well written Flash/Air desktop apps can now be ported to mobile devices quickly. And not just one specific type of mobile device, but several platforms of them. In the past month I've ported 3 very large enterprise Flex based UIs to mobile devices, and the results are fantastic.


I'm willing to bet you did not use any localized strings. But if so please enlighten us as to the actionscript method used to end up with NSLocalizedString for iOS.

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post #24 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

Doesn't matter. Apps made with this crap will be rejected due to poor functionality. Steve doesn't sell crap in his store, and every app made like this is going to be crap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

With HTML5, Flash is NEVER needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

I can't imagine somebody being that lazy. Crap in crap out.

We need to keep this sort of lousy software OFF of Steve's iPads!

Such a familiar writing style. I swear haven't we gotten rid of you at least twice already?

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #25 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patranus View Post

You remind me of the developers who came up with the banner ad at the top of this page. Sweet, a Flash banner ad that displays a static image.

Didn't get the memo? Ghostery + Click to Flash = No ads!

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post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

What issues have you found in developing your apps for Android?

AppleInsider addressed this meme some time ago:


http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...teve_jobs.html

and this is what TweetDeck had to say a week prior to the article above.
http://blog.tweetdeck.com/android-ecosystem
"October 12, 2010 - Android Ecosystem Infoporn Overload

As we bring our initial Android TweetDeck beta period to a close, we wanted to quickly reflect on the Android ecosystem and what might be considered extreme fragmentation. To date we've had 36,427 active beta testers and below you can see the massive variety of phones and Android OS versions everyone is running. We were really shocked to see the number of custom roms, crazy phones and general level of customization/hackalicious nature of Android. From our perspective it's pretty cool to have our app work on such a wide variety of devices and Android OS variations."
post #27 of 44
ok, so i've been going over Flash the last few days on lynda.com to learn Flash. Should I even bother continuing? Is there another alternative?
post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by manzanaboy View Post

ok, so i've been going over Flash the last few days on lynda.com to learn Flash. Should I even bother continuing?

You shouldn't have bothered starting.

Quote:
Is there another alternative?

HTML5 for video. Animation. Navigation bars.... anything Flash does, really.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #29 of 44
wow. ok what about dreamweaver?
post #30 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by manzanaboy View Post

wow. ok what about dreamweaver?

I'll just go ahead and vomit on my shoes.

You're on a Mac, right? Coda. Coda's great. Use that in conjunction with Hype (for high-level HTML5 animations. It's really, REALLY new right now, but updates should make it MUCH better).

No sense in wasting hundreds on Dreamweaver.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I'll just go ahead and vomit on my shoes.

You're on a Mac, right? Coda. Coda's great. Use that in conjunction with Hype (for high-level HTML5 animations. It's really, REALLY new right now, but updates should make it MUCH better).

No sense in wasting hundreds on Dreamweaver.

Still trying to compose myself from the "vomit on my shoes comment"

You're right I'm on Mac. I've just had both Flash and Dreamweaver for years and been wanting to take advantage of them since they came along with Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign.
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I'm willing to bet you did not use any localized strings. But if so please enlighten us as to the actionscript method used to end up with NSLocalizedString for iOS.

i did localize. Easily done with an XML package.
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You shouldn't have bothered starting.



HTML5 for video. Animation. Navigation bars.... anything Flash does, really.

Agreed.

Look up Hype in the App store, it looks like it can do a lot of what Flash does on the internet, and anymore than what it does (like a total Flash site) should never be put on the internet anyway.

Code in html, CSS and javascript or go away. Flash on the internet is wrong in just about every way. I have never, ever liked it and am so relieved we have better alternatives now. (been a web designer since 1995)

Here is a really good article about Hype - http://mashable.com/2011/05/20/hype/
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by manzanaboy View Post

wow. ok what about dreamweaver?

Must agree about Dreamweaver, I have learned it but I really hate how bloated and stupid it is, it can't even show divs properly in Design view (even Komposer does a much better job) I don't use Coda, mostly because it is too much for my needs (just personal taste, it is a good program), but I like Espresso, which is Coda-like, but closer to what I want to use. I mostly focus on CSS and php these days as my most of my work recently is customizing complex themes for Wordpress using the Genesis framework. So the companion program to Espresso, CSSEdit is my main program, eclipses Dreamweaver's CSS by far. I do use DreamWeaver, but less and less, the FTP for it is so annoying that I bought Transmit which I totally love.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by manzanaboy View Post

You're right I'm on Mac. I've just had both Flash and Dreamweaver for years and been wanting to take advantage of them since they came along with Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign.

Have you had the same programs for years? If so the CSS in Dreamweaver is so woefully out of date (and the html for that matter too) then you are completely wasting your time. If up to date, then you are a bit better off. It doesn't hurt to learn Dreamweaver since you can get more jobs if you know it, but you would be better off watching the CSS videos at Lynda.com, CSS drives all of the layout and is so crucial for good looking and functioning sites.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Flash Platform evangelist Serge Jespers demonstrated the ability of Flash Builder 4.5 and Flex 4.5 to build iOS software in a video accompanying the post.

What the heck is up with his putting that god-awful Android sticker on the MacAir anyway?! As bad as an ugly tattoo.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

If everyone did like you do, sites like Apple Insider would all go out of business.

Well, as I understand it Click2Flash only hides the Flash content, therefore the webmaster still thinks the client is indeed looking at the ad. If you delete the Flash plugin the webmaster can see that the client is unable to see the ad. So I don't think AI will go out of business if people use Click2Flash.
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post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post

Well, as I understand it Click2Flash only hides the Flash content, therefore the webmaster still thinks the client is indeed looking at the ad. If you delete the Flash plugin the webmaster can see that the client is unable to see the ad. So I don't think AI will go out of business if people use Click2Flash.

I disabled Flash entirely in all of my computers. I only have OmniWeb able to load it and I only load select sites like Hulu, otherwise I browse with Safari, no Flash at all. So if AI wants me to see ads then they can change their criteria. I would support AI of course, love this site. but not loading Flash thank you. Omni Web crashes several times daily. I can watch streaming Netflix all day on Silverlight, no crash at all (fans do rev up though) but I do get tired of sending crash reports all day, I really do.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'd love to hear from Flash && iOS developers that can tell me 1) If this is pretty doing a Flash app to create an IOS app, 2) the quality of the code it creates, and 3) if it's just better to use Obj-C/Xcode to create your iOS apps.

I have been working with Flash for some time.

While I didn't get too hardcore with ActionScript almost 10 years ago I did do some XML parsing stuff off a live database which updated some visuals.

Since then we've had ActionScript 3.0 and Flex and what not.

I revisited ActionScript in 2008-2009. I made a product display engine and a pure-Flash website also driven off XML coming from a simple PHP-MySQL database. Pretty but ~Evil~

A few weeks ago at the bookshop I browsed through a book on using Flash Builder to make iOS apps with Flash/Flex. It does not look good. You might as well go learn native Xcode development (which I haven't yet). Also I don't trust Adobe to actually know what they're doing.

I just started downloading and reading about Corona SDK:
http://www.anscamobile.com/corona/

Apparently some ex-Flash people involved in that. I think if you are after rapid development, this is probably the better way to go. LUA code seems ActionScript-like and not too daunting compared to Objective C.

But anyways I'm planning how I can transition to iPad development. Taking the full dive into Objective C is no mean feat, and there's very few books yet on iPad development with Xcode 4, not 3.
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherperson View Post

1. ANOTHER programming language I have to learn? I don't care how easy it is... No thanks, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

2. Can this Adobe development system that can create apps for various mobile devices also create a conventional website in the same build step as just another target?

Corona looks interesting in that it can build for iOS and Android with the same source code. It appears highly geared towards games and possibly frivolous stuff but I haven't gotten deeper into non-game apps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

The only thing I can say about this is: big meh

Flash tools for cross-platform applications have been available on PC's and Macs for decades, but the only things they are used for are banners, obnoxious websites, animations, and silly games that 9 out of 10 times also have a native version. For games, alternatives like Unity and Corona already exist that are much cheaper for developers.

Who exactly is waiting for tools like this, except lazy developers who think they can get away with substandard applications that perform mediocre on every platform, instead of trying to go the extra mile and make applications the perform outstanding on some?

Adobe is realling clinging to every last straw to keep their 'write once, deploy everywhere' development tools going, but if history teaches us anything, it's that developers don't actually mind all that much porting their games or sticking to one or two platforms.

Can anyone provide more insight on Corona?

Quote:
Originally Posted by manzanaboy View Post

Still trying to compose myself from the "vomit on my shoes comment"

You're right I'm on Mac. I've just had both Flash and Dreamweaver for years and been wanting to take advantage of them since they came along with Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign.

At this stage, I would advise, don't learn Flash. Learn HTML+CSS or iOS native development or both if you're up to it. Dreamweaver for me is just used as a text editor with integrated FTP. Nobody uses the Design View in Dreamweaver unless you have a very "controlled" project.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ggbrigette View Post

Look up Hype in the App store, it looks like it can do a lot of what Flash does on the internet, and anymore than what it does (like a total Flash site) should never be put on the internet anyway.

Code in html, CSS and javascript or go away. Flash on the internet is wrong in just about every way. I have never, ever liked it and am so relieved we have better alternatives now. (been a web designer since 1995)

Here is a really good article about Hype - http://mashable.com/2011/05/20/hype/

Hype looks really interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

I hate to break the news to you, but Steve Jobs does allow crap apps in his store. I'm glancing at the App Store right now and it's filled with numerous non-functional, blatant copyright infringing, and terrible apps.

I think every week a new Dunt Hunt game is released on the App Store that rips the sprites and sounds directly from the NES game and barely functions. Or fake apps like Future Baby Face that seem to be a random image generator that took probably all of a few minutes to write. Some of the apps seem to be minimally functional merely to generate ad revenue.

There's definitely all kinds of infuriatingly silly apps that are approved for the App Store. Flash Builder may contribute to this. Corona may contribute to this. But I think we are at a "bridging stage" just like when we had web pages made with FrontPage with animated GIFs of explosions all over the place. Eventually better websites came along with handcoding HTML+CSS, Dreamweaver (earlier versions), and then devolved again with MySpace and Facebook (Facebook, while complex, is remarkably cluttered).

Interesting times.

The challenge is that we can have one-person website teams. But a one-person iPad app team? Except for the highly talented, anything significant is going to need more people. Or does it? What's your opinion.

The thing is with the iPad app, unlike the iPhone, I find the built-in interface widgets are only useful for things like Settings, etc. Everything else interface-wise for a decent iPad app will have to be custom designed.

The other thought I had is that some companies only need some very basic apps. For example, interactive Annual Reports or even Quarterly Magazines/Newsletters that are distributed for iPad. There are a ton of companies that want to show "we have an iPad app wooo". Tapping into this clientele with visual or rapid development tools like Corona may suffice, and while it does add to the "clutter" of the App Store, I think it's a valid endeavour. The self-contained, offline nature of iOS apps trumps HTML5 web apps at this stage (yes HTML5 has offline storage etc. but it's still rather messy - see the Google I/O Keynotes, the deprecation of SQL Lite, etc). For example, even if you had an Annual Report as a set of HTML pages, how would it all be stored offline as a web app? The one-page paradigm for web-apps would mean you'd load all HTML pages at once and then swap them in and out during page viewing. If you "lost" that cached "one-page" web app for whatever reason you'd have to navigate to the specific web page and load it again.

I think just like at the start of the web revolution we started needing better indexing of web pages and searching for useful websites, a whole new ecosystem will arise to index and search the App Store. There are some out there now, but the potential is larger. Each app has a public iTunes-formated HTML webpage and it is indexed by Google. But is there a "better-Google" for iOS Apps? Maybe called "Poogle"? Poogle, Appgle, Aaaagle, Oooogle, AppBing, BingApps, PingBing, Padgle, Padoogle... ??? Just brainstorming here. (I guess if I was in Silicon Valley someone would be throwing a few hundred mil in seed money at me already )
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