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40% of European smartphone buyers plan on buying iPhone next, 19% choose Android

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 
According to a recent survey, smartphone purchasers in Europe are twice as likely to buy Apple's iPhone than a Google Android device as their next handset.

An early look at the findings from the Yankee Group's 2011 European Mobile User Study revealed that 40 percent of European smartphone buyers plan on making the iPhone their next device, as compared to 19 percent for Android, BGR reported on Thursday. Also, 17 percent of respondents went with Research in Motion's BlackBerry, while 15 percent chose Nokia.

These findings highlight the continued strength of Apple in the European smartphone market and, in particular, its phenomenal brand appeal, said Declan Lonergan, research VP at Yankee Group. The data also highlights the enormous challenges faced by Nokia and RIM to retain mind share and market share in this increasingly dynamic and competitive marketplace.

The study polled 5,000 consumers and 2,250 employees and IT decision-makers in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the U.K. Employees also said in the study that they are 58 percent more productive during long-distance travel with a tablet, and mobile users tended to have more than one device, switching between screens depending on context.

The findings come as analysts have suggested that Android may be poised lose some of its market share gains after two straight years of growth. Android lost share to the iPhone in the U.S. during the March quarter, driven in part by sales of the iPhone 4 on Verizon, which reached 2.2 million units by the end of March.

Europe is Apple's second best-performing region for the iPhone. As of the March quarter, Apple's smartphone market share stands at just above 20.8 percent in the area, behind only the handset's 30 percent market share in the U.S. By comparison, Android currently comprises 35.7 percent of smartphone sales in Western Europe.

iPhone's market share by region | Source: IDC
post #2 of 44
I am not really surprised about to numbers in this article. When ever I am traveling using public transportation in Erope, I see that the majority of people using mobile devices, actually use iOS devices rather than anything else.
About the graph below the article, if it is going to be reused more often, I strongly suggest to redraw it. How about using numbers?
post #3 of 44
I think that a lot of these will end up going for a cheaper android, unless apple does release a mid priced device. Then they will probably reach or even exceed their 40%.
post #4 of 44
Personally, I'd continue to buy the iphone, but I have invested in the ecosystem.

It's not clear from this survey what would reverse the trend - i.e. what's compelling European customers to favoring more iPhones when they have been buying more Androids for a while now. If the reason for favoring Androids is pricing, then nothing is changing. If it is anticipation for iPhone 5, then that initial excitement will wane and Europe will settle back into the current Android-iPhone ratio. Unless the US, there is no Verizon effect to stifle Android growth.
post #5 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairb View Post

I think that a lot of these will end up going for a cheaper android, unless apple does release a mid priced device. Then they will probably reach or even exceed their 40%.

A subsidized phone is a subsidized phone. And "saving" $100 up front when you're going to be spending $100 or so a month for the next two years seems more than a little shortsighted...
post #6 of 44
What are the other 20% buying? What other phones are counted as smart phones?
post #7 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by McDavies View Post

What are the other 20% buying? What other phones are counted as smart phones?

???
40% to buy iOS
19% to buy Android
17% to buy RIM
15% to buy Nokia

That leaves 9% for those that probably states they were "unsure". Where do you get 20%?
post #8 of 44
Europeans know their stuff.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #9 of 44
I see a lot of iDevices in the UK -- initially, a fair percentage of people jailbroke their iPhones, now people are buying factory-unlocked phones, as they hold their value (you get more if the iPhone is both factory unlocked and jailbreakable). My lad has just sold his unlocked white iPhone 3GS for £285 (US $455). Others are getting as high as £325 (US $520) for their 3GS.

When I bought the first iPhone, my network did not have iPhones so I JB it and used my own SIM in it and moved to a rolling contract. I then bought a factory unlocked 3GS and simply swapped out the SIMs. I recently spoke to my network about iPhone4, as I am entitled to a "network subsidy" as I have not upgraded my phone for 4 years. The guy I spoke to advised me it would still be cheaper for me to buy an unlocked iPhone from the Apple Store and remain on my existing contract -- he doubled my cross-network minutes and SMS packages and reduced the monthly charge by one-third.

I don't know about others, but bartering is in my blood -- if you don't ask, you don't get! It is surprising how much leeway some of the network advisers have in offering discounts, and I have now been with the same network since December 1994. Networks expect churn but will also go some way to retain customers.
post #10 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sip View Post

I see a lot of iDevices in the UK -- initially, a fair percentage of people jailbroke their iPhones, now people are buying factory-unlocked phones, as they hold their value (you get more if the iPhone is both factory unlocked and jailbreakable). My lad has just sold his unlocked white iPhone 3GS for £285 (US $455). Others are getting as high as £325 (US $520) for their 3GS.

When I bought the first iPhone, my network did not have iPhones so I JB it and used my own SIM in it and moved to a rolling contract. I then bought a factory unlocked 3GS and simply swapped out the SIMs. I recently spoke to my network about iPhone4, as I am entitled to a "network subsidy" as I have not upgraded my phone for 4 years. The guy I spoke to advised me it would still be cheaper for me to buy an unlocked iPhone from the Apple Store and remain on my existing contract -- he doubled my cross-network minutes and SMS packages and reduced the monthly charge by one-third.

I don't know about others, but bartering is in my blood -- if you don't ask, you don't get! It is surprising how much leeway some of the network advisers have in offering discounts, and I have now been with the same network since December 1994. Networks expect churn but will also go some way to retain customers.

I'm the same way, and I think the unlocked iPhones will be very popular - especially in Europe and Asia. If the iPhone 5 comes out unlocked, and worldband, there may well be a stronger resurgence in iPhone sales than previously. Unfortunately we Americans don't really scrutinize the deals we get very well and few would understand that paying full price and negotiating a custom plan would save a boatload of money.
If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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If you are going to insist on being an ass, at least demonstrate the intelligence to be a smart one
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post #11 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahmlco View Post

A subsidized phone is a subsidized phone. And "saving" $100 up front when you're going to be spending $100 or so a month for the next two years seems more than a little shortsighted...

Subsidies are illegal in parts of the EU and pre-pay phones are a lot more popular in Europe compared to North America. Even the price of a contract tends to vary depending on the value of the phone in Europe.

So, for a premium phone like the iPhone to attract the attention of 40% of smartphone buyers in Europe, it must be doing very well.
post #12 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Subsidies are illegal in parts of the EU and pre-pay phones are a lot more popular in Europe compared to North America.

From wiki: Singapore & Israel are the only countries in the world that forbid SIM locking and contract/phone bundling outright.

Belgium did used to but not since mid-2009.

There are rules in some EU markets that require carriers to unlock phones but that's not the same thing at all. France probably has the strongest rules within the EU for supplying an unlock, and you can pick up an iPhone-4 for 200 Euro on contract there, so clearly those laws are not significantly impacting French carriers' ability to subsidize their phones.
post #13 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahmlco View Post

A subsidized phone is a subsidized phone. And "saving" $100 up front when you're going to be spending $100 or so a month for the next two years seems more than a little shortsighted...

Yes, in America thats short sighted, but Phone contracts in many parts of Europe are MUCH, MUCH cheaper. I pay £30 a month for my iPhone4 contract (£169 upfront - saving of £430) and get 3GB fo Internet (with tethering), unlimited texts and 500mins (or unlimited if its to someone on the same network). It will take aprox 15months worth of payments to pay off the £430 difference, leaving 9months remaining (£270 worth of bills), which is what most Americans pay in just two or three months on contract.

Given how cheap you can get phone deals over the pond, a lower upfront cost can be the deal breaker, but I can see why the iPhone is flying up in popularity from a price perspective - my friend just got a 16GB iPhone4 on a two year contract with an upfront cost of only £69! He gets truly Unlimited Internet (nearly 10GB last month using it as a modem to download torrents, no penalty or warnings), 2000mins and Unlimited texts for £35 a month!

... at night.

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... at night.

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post #14 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph L View Post

What is the methodology here?

I have trouble believing that more than half of those people would reject the iPhone for something else.

60/40 is almost 2:1 against Steve! That seems pretty unlikely with the iP5 being released within weeks.

you don't get a chance to step out of your bubble much?
post #15 of 44
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post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

According to the chart supplied with the article, moving beyond what people say to what they actually do looks even worse, with Apple below 30%.

You're linking worldwide share data, this thread is about EU market data. It's not odd that their worldwide share is lower, when they are barely present in China, Japan and a bunch of other markets.

If you went looking for EU marketshare data you might have found this putting Apple up at 45%, implying they're also capturing about half the 'undecideds' on average. Now if you can find some EU-wide data that shows them at 30% then that would be interesting.
post #17 of 44
These findings highlight the continued strength of Apple in the European smartphone market and, in particular, its phenomenal brand appeal,

I find this quote really fascinating. It really shows why competitors fail to compete against Apple so miserably (classic example being the iPad). Most people get so taken in by Apple's "brand appeal", they forget why that brand appeal actually exists.

Because they make damn good products. I like the Apple brand, because I know when I buy a product from them it will be a well made, well-conceived product. I know the company spent time and effort on it, and thought its use case through, rather than hoping I would find some way to take advantage of it.
post #18 of 44
I agree with MacRulez statement, what people say and what people do are two totally different things.
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairb View Post

I think that a lot of these will end up going for a cheaper android, unless apple does release a mid priced device. Then they will probably reach or even exceed their 40%.

There's the rub. Unlike the US, where the handset cost difference is low compared to the service cost, there is a huge difference in price between iPhone and others. Most buyers of Andriod phones buy them as a cheaper alternative to iPhone rather than any dislike of Apple or like for "free and open" Google
I sold phones for 4 months last summer while I was unable to travel for my normal work and this was something that I saw literally every day.
The best selling Android phones aren't the high end ones that sell in the US, they are things like the Orange SanFrancisco, the HTC Europa and ones that are on run-out like the SGS and Desire.
Samsung have tried to capture more of the market by pitching the SGS2 low from day one and it will be interesting to see how that sells.
I have just come back from Paris and I have literally never seen so many iPhone and iPads. Wher money is no object, people buy iPhones
post #20 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairb View Post

I think that a lot of these will end up going for a cheaper android, unless apple does release a mid priced device. Then they will probably reach or even exceed their 40%.

I think this is going to happen sooner than most think. All the speculation seems to be that the iPhone "Nano" will target China and India but there is a huge market in Europe for a premium "Pay as you go" phone.
post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrispoe View Post

I agree with MacRulez statement, what people say and what people do are two totally different things.

Yes, except as the data I linked showed, in Europe that statement of intent matched existing marketshare, so your point is?
post #22 of 44
The article isn't clear - are these people who already have a smartphone and talking about their purchase, or people who are considering a smartphone for the first time?

That could significantly change the interpretation of the data. For example, if 60% of people surveyed already own an iPhone, but only 40% of people surveyed said their next smartphone would be an iPhone, that's a significant decline.

What did the survey actually measure, and what is the current market share for each phone type?
post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by aep528 View Post

What did the survey actually measure, and what is the current market share for each phone type?

http://www.yankeegroup.com/research/...obileStudy.pdf

The survey measured intention amongst consumers who intend that their next handset would be a smartphone. The release doesn't explicitly say it but it strongly implies that they survey is NOT limited to people who already own smart phones. If it was limited to only smartphone users I would expect them to say this.

Existing EU wide smartphone share can be found on the link I posted a while back

http://www.fiercewireless.com/europe...are/2011-02-09

45% existing share is compatible with a 40% strong intent and half of the 10% or so undecideds ending up buying iPhone. Overall this survey would indicate that Apple is holding position in the EU market.
post #24 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Europeans know their stuff.



The funny thing about this, is that Apple does next to no advertising in Europe, I can't even remember seeing a single tv advert or billboard here, ever. So much for 'Apple is all marketing'.
post #25 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post



The funny thing about this, is that Apple does next to no advertising in Europe, I can't even remember seeing a single tv advert or billboard here, ever. So much for 'Apple is all marketing'.

I think they did a poster campaign at London Underground stations - though I can't find any pictures so maybe I'm mis-remembering. But I think Waterloo station or Bank station maybe - one of the long travelators anyway.

Edit :

http://www.flickr.com/photos/98587546@N00/5622869136/
post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post



The funny thing about this, is that Apple does next to no advertising in Europe, I can't even remember seeing a single tv advert or billboard here, ever. So much for 'Apple is all marketing'.

Lots of Apple advertising in Paris and London - on billboards but not on TV. Been a long time since I've been to the Netherlands.
post #27 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

These findings highlight the continued strength of Apple in the European smartphone market and, in particular, its phenomenal brand appeal,

I find this quote really fascinating. It really shows why competitors fail to compete against Apple so miserably (classic example being the iPad). Most people get so taken in by Apple's "brand appeal", they forget why that brand appeal actually exists.

Because they make damn good products. I like the Apple brand, because I know when I buy a product from them it will be a well made, well-conceived product. I know the company spent time and effort on it, and thought its use case through, rather than hoping I would find some way to take advantage of it.

Yep. There is a certain part of the market that buys Apple because it is hip and trendy but most buy because of the brand reputation for simplicity, reliablity and service couple with the "looks good and feels good" effect.
post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

From wiki: Singapore & Israel are the only countries in the world that forbid SIM locking and contract/phone bundling outright.

Belgium did used to but not since mid-2009.

There are rules in some EU markets that require carriers to unlock phones but that's not the same thing at all. France probably has the strongest rules within the EU for supplying an unlock, and you can pick up an iPhone-4 for 200 Euro on contract there, so clearly those laws are not significantly impacting French carriers' ability to subsidize their phones.

There has been legislation going thru the European parliament to force carriers to unlock phones when your contractural commitment has ended. In practise most carriers will do this anyway now and certianly in the UK there is a "Gentleman's agreement" between carriers that makes it so.
Very few people in the UK buy unlocked phones at full price but the iPhone is an exception. At launch 40% of iPhones sold at Apple stores were bought of contract and it is still around 20% now. The high resale value on iPhones contributes to this hugely.
post #29 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galeforce View Post

Very few people in the UK buy unlocked phones at full price but the iPhone is an exception. At launch 40% of iPhones sold at Apple stores were bought of contract and it is still around 20% now. The high resale value on iPhones contributes to this hugely.

Erm, do you have a link for that? My recollection of buying a first gen iPhone in the UK was that you had to get it with an O2 contract. I thought that you could only buy unlocked phones in the UK after that exclusive expired in 2009. In fact back in 07 when it launched you had to jailbreak the phone to unlock it.

The BBC seems to confirm my recollection http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7085643.stm

Those figures you quote might have been right for the iPhone-4 though.
post #30 of 44
Here's their website

http://www.yankeegroup.com/home.do

They are the suppliers of the data. By looking at their website, are they reputable enough?
post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Erm, do you have a link for that? My recollection of buying a first gen iPhone in the UK was that you had to get it with an O2 contract. I thought that you could only buy unlocked phones in the UK after that exclusive expired in 2009. In fact back in 07 when it launched you had to jailbreak the phone to unlock it.

The BBC seems to confirm my recollection http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7085643.stm

Those figures you quote might have been right for the iPhone-4 though.

Yes, sorry, I was referring to the iPhone4. The 3G which was the first sold in UK, was locked from O2 but they would unlock at the end of contract or if you paid off your remaining months. The 3GS was available unlocked (full price) and on all carriers (locked, subsidised).
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbinger View Post

Personally, I'd continue to buy the iphone, but I have invested in the ecosystem.

It's not clear from this survey what would reverse the trend - i.e. what's compelling European customers to favoring more iPhones when they have been buying more Androids for a while now. If the reason for favoring Androids is pricing, then nothing is changing. If it is anticipation for iPhone 5, then that initial excitement will wane and Europe will settle back into the current Android-iPhone ratio. Unless the US, there is no Verizon effect to stifle Android growth.

One thing that is different in Europe is a much deeper mistrust of Google and also that many of the Google services aren't available in Europe or have become available much later.
post #33 of 44
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post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Yes, except as the data I linked showed, in Europe that statement of intent matched existing marketshare, so your point is?

I don't think your link is saying intent matches market share at all.
The link you showed was for Mobile OS's market share, not Iphone market share. The reason IOS has 40% plus in your link is because that link is including all IOS devices and not just Iphones. If you removed ipods and ipads share, it looks to be saying Iphone market share may be well under 30% like MacRulez suggested.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Actually, as I noted in the portion of my post that you replied to, I'm merely using the chart Apple Insider provided with the article, labeled "iPhone's market share by region | Source: IDC":

removed...

According to the chart's key, Europe is identified by the pink squares.

The only mistake I made was referring to the highest number, which turns out to be US share. European share is shown in that chart even lower than I cited, about 21%.

If Apple Insider made a mistake with that chart you can correct them at this address: news@appleinsider.com

The chart that cloud glazer referred to monitors web traffic. Statcounter, ftw. That probably does over-measure Apple's position relative to the actual units sold. However, very little of this is important to the future - Apple is trending higher, and Android lower, possbily because of the lack of apps, or the seriously low quality of most Android phones.. Deal now with the article we have before us, or complain to news@appleinsider.com

EDIT:

Actually the article says

As of the March quarter, Apple's smartphone market share stands at just above 20.8 percent in the area, behind only the handset's 30 percent market share in the U.S. By comparison, Android currently comprises 35.7 percent of smartphone sales in Western Europe.
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post #36 of 44
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post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahmlco View Post

A subsidized phone is a subsidized phone. And "saving" $100 up front when you're going to be spending $100 or so a month for the next two years seems more than a little shortsighted...

Your thinking of the US market, in Europe 75-80% of people are on PAYG which means we buy our own phones. Almost everyone on contract ever has it on expenses or at least partly paid for by someone else. The iPhone is a tougth buy at ~$700 for a 3GS.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post



The funny thing about this, is that Apple does next to no advertising in Europe, I can't even remember seeing a single tv advert or billboard here, ever. So much for 'Apple is all marketing'.

Wot! in the UK Apple adverts are on tv every day and as for billboards it seems, at least in the UK and Spain, 80% iPad/iPhone, 20% Samsung and 0% everyone else. There are probably others but for billboards it seems like only Apple and Samsung. Now Nokia, they dont seem to be doing any advertising and that's definatly hurting them.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

A


2010:
Gartner: Android OS Sales Trump iOS And RIM, Grew 888 Percent In 2010
http://techcrunch.com/2011/02/09/gar...rcent-in-2010/


Android devices have collectively outsold the iPhone since April of 2010, and continued their climb even after Apple's latest smartphone launched in the summer.
http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...one_sales.html


Yes, but that is so last year.
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post #40 of 44
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