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Apple's iPad commands 1% of all web traffic after just 1 year

post #1 of 22
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A new report indicates the iPad now holds a 1 percent share of global web browsing, more than 50 times greater than its closest competitor.

Recent statistics from analytics firm Net Applications' NetMarketShare report show the iPad has continued to grow worldwide since its launch in early 2010. The tablet recently broke the 1 percent mark in worldwide browsing and accounts for 2 percent of browsing in the U.S.

The report showed the iPad to have 53 times the usage share of its nearest competitor, the Android-based Samsung Galaxy Tab throughout May. Apple's tablet also dwarfed the third-placed Motorola Xoom tablet's share of global web browsing with a share 76 times greater. In addition when compared to the Research in Motion's Blackberry PlayBook, the iPad has roughly 306 times the usage.

In the U.S. mobile browser market, the iPad takes a solid 25.5 percent, only trailing Android (31.6 percent) and the iPhone (35.2 percent). However, when iPhone and iPad data are combined, they take over 60.7 percent of U.S. mobile browsing, a figure almost double that of Android. Blackberry came in at 6.9 percent, while Symbian, Windows Mobile and webOS are left far behind, accounting for less than 0.5 percent.

Net Applications compiles its figures from an "exclusive on-demand network of live stats customers" with more than 160 million visitors per month. The firm also classifies and reports on more than 430 referral sources identified as search engines.

Source: The Register/Net Applications

The iPad is expected to continue to pick up steam this fall with the release of iOS 5. The addition of tabbed browsing in Mobile Safari will bring the iPad's browsing experience closer in line to the Mac and could further boost the device's growth as a mobile browsing platform.

Source: The Register/Net Applications

Last month, research firm comScore reported that the iPad comprised 89 percent of global tablet traffic. A May survey from Nielsen found Apple's touchscreen tablet held 82 percent of the tablet market in the U.S.

Today also marks 14 months since the iPad first launched in America, further highlighting the success of Apple's venture into the tablet space. Apple announced last month that total sales of the device had topped the 25 million milestone.
post #2 of 22
That doesn't surprise me, and I am proud to be a part of that 1%.

I think that quite a few people use their iPads for streaming purposes, which uses a lot of bandwidth on services like Netflix or people who even use their iPads to watch Cable TV on.

50 times greater than its closest competitor.

post #3 of 22
Seems to me that actual iPad usage may be higher than 1%.

PS: I wish Netflix would update to work with iOS 5.0 already.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

I think that quite a few people use their iPads for streaming purposes, which uses a lot of bandwidth on services like Netflix or people who even use their iPads to watch Cable TV on.

If it's measuring mobile browsing is it doing it per page hit or by total data? Is it only using browser data or are apps that are accessing a secure server also counting? How are they getting this data?
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post #4 of 22
The new adage that the best camera is the one you actually have with you (iPhone) seems to apply here as well. The best browser is the one you actually have with you. Yeah, I know, the iPhone has a browser and is in your pocket, but practically speaking, the phone browser experience makes web surfing more of a "settle for it" proposition. The browser experience on the iPad is the equal of any laptop, but more non-business types are likely to have an iPad than a laptop when out and about.
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post #5 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


If it's measuring mobile browsing is it doing it per page hit or by total data? Is it only using browser data or are apps that are accessing a secure server also counting? How are they getting this data?

You might be on to something there. If their data is only taken from browsers or registering website hits, then the actual total internet traffic used by iPads might be much higher, when you include all of the streaming services and things that actually use a ton of data.
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

If it's measuring mobile browsing is it doing it per page hit or by total data? Is it only using browser data or are apps that are accessing a secure server also counting? How are they getting this data?

It has nothing to do with total data, total pageviews, nor streaming services. It appears to be logging daily unique visitors from a web browser, not all access via Internet applications.

Here's the NetMarketshare FAQ.
post #7 of 22
I think that all app internet traffic was not even included here! Since Apples paradigm is using an 'App' instead of the browser-based 'Web', we can assume that most people on iPad rather use apps instead of Safari. I don't think that this traffic has been counted so far.

On the downside, we can also assume that huge video, music and photo media files are more heavily loaded from iPads than from regular PCs, so we cannot tell about usage time derived from that traffic data.

But still iOS is much heavier than Android although one would assume that price sensitive Android users pull more (free) stuff from the net than iOSers. I'd say: Android users see their device rather as a nice feature phone but not as a smartphone while real smartphone addicts go for the iPhone.
post #8 of 22
Clearly Apple geeks mostly don't read the register. It took days for this to hit TUAW, and from there here. Also I wonder if they can distinguish between different OS builds of Opera? Can they even tell that the iPad build is from a Mobile?
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Clearly Apple geeks mostly don't read the register. It took days for this to hit TUAW, and from there here. Also I wonder if they can distinguish between different OS builds of Opera? Can they even tell that the iPad build is from a Mobile?

Sure, why not?

(Unless the operator is spoofing), the user agent string that identifies is unique, right? So an iPad running an older version of iOS shows a slightly different browser version. Just like PCs running the nightly build of whatever browser poison, phones, whatever.

Should be kiddie play in collating the data.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

You might be on to something there. If their data is only taken from browsers or registering website hits, then the actual total internet traffic used by iPads might be much higher, when you include all of the streaming services and things that actually use a ton of data.

On the other hand, the tiny amount of RAM in iPads (especially iPad 1's) mean that any generic Safari web browsing that is done will tend to reload from the site much more often. (ie. every time you hit the "back" button or switch panels). Safari in 5.0 seems to help that quite a bit, but you're still going to skew results a bit if you're comparing to desktop usage (which the 1% figure is.)

On the other hand, the relative percentages of the mobile numbers should be pretty accurate, although the relative fewer apps on non-iOS devices might be inflating their numbers somewhat.
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Sure, why not?

(Unless the operator is spoofing), the user agent string that identifies is unique, right? So an iPad running an older version of iOS shows a slightly different browser version. Just like PCs running the nightly build of whatever browser poison, phones, whatever.

Should be kiddie play in collating the data.

Opera mini automatically spoofs as a grown up version of Opera I believe. I think it then encodes it's true version in the space for the platform, so I'm not sure if the real platform is readily available. I hear it's quite popular on the iPad, though I've not used it myself.
post #12 of 22
Wrote this post being part of that one percent of Internet.
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post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

If it's measuring mobile browsing is it doing it per page hit or by total data? Is it only using browser data or are apps that are accessing a secure server also counting? How are they getting this data?

They would have to get their data the same way Google Analytics or Overture do, through javascript in the web pages of their customers' sites. When your sampling size is sufficiently large you can make generalized assumptions about the web as a whole.

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post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Opera mini automatically spoofs as a grown up version of Opera I believe. I think it then encodes it's true version in the space for the platform, so I'm not sure if the real platform is readily available. I hear it's quite popular on the iPad, though I've not used it myself.

Not sure about the popularity of Opera on iPad. I don't use it myself although I have dabbled with other browsers such as Skyfire, Atomic, and iSwifter.
post #15 of 22
Slightly concerned that the dip between January and March correlates with when my partner lost his iPad 1 travelling overseas.
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Seems to me that actual iPad usage may be higher than 1%

Definitely. I'm writing this from NewsRack right now which may or may not identify itself specifically as an iPad (apps like this usually just mention iOS in the browser request string). iCab is my browser of choice on the iPad and I've frequently set it to identify itself as Safari for Mac to bypass mobile versions of certain sites. When set to 'standard' I'm not sure iCab even mentions the device it's running on. No idea about Atomic and other apps like IM+, Tapatalk, and Reddit's Alien Blue.

Speaking of Tapatalk -- support for it on AI would be nice.
post #17 of 22
uh? Isn't my laptop mobile? Are they only counting 3G traffic?
post #18 of 22
Does "mobile browsing" not include WiFi??

That's the only reason I can see for not including the iPodTouch in the mix. On the other hand, if it doesn't include browsing via WiFi, that raises some other questions...
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post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Does "mobile browsing" not include WiFi??

That's the only reason I can see for not including the iPodTouch in the mix. On the other hand, if it doesn't include browsing via WiFi, that raises some other questions...

iPod Touch is included with the iPhone in the report
post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A new report indicates the iPad now holds a 1 percent share of global web browsing, more than 50 times greater than its closest competitor.

Recent statistics from analytics firm Net Applications' NetMarketShare report show the iPad has continued to grow worldwide since its launch in early 2010. The tablet recently broke the 1 percent mark in worldwide browsing and accounts for 2 percent of browsing in the U.S.

The report showed the iPad to have “53 times the usage share of its nearest competitor,” the Android-based Samsung Galaxy Tab throughout May. Apple's tablet also dwarfed the third-placed Motorola Xoom tablet's share of global web browsing with a share 76 times greater. In addition when compared to the Research in Motion's Blackberry PlayBook, the iPad has roughly 306 times the usage.

In the U.S. mobile browser market, the iPad takes a solid 25.5 percent, only trailing Android (31.6 percent) and the iPhone (35.2 percent). However, when iPhone and iPad data are combined, they take over 60.7 percent of U.S. mobile browsing, a figure almost double that of Android. Blackberry came in at 6.9 percent, while Symbian, Windows Mobile and webOS are left far behind, accounting for less than 0.5 percent.

Net Applications compiles its figures from an "exclusive on-demand network of live stats customers" with more than 160 million visitors per month. The firm also classifies and reports on more than 430 referral sources identified as search engines.

Source: The Register/Net Applications

The iPad is expected to continue to pick up steam this fall with the release of iOS 5. The addition of tabbed browsing in Mobile Safari will bring the iPad's browsing experience closer in line to the Mac and could further boost the device's growth as a mobile browsing platform.

Source: The Register/Net Applications

Last month, research firm comScore reported that the iPad comprised 89 percent of global tablet traffic. A May survey from Nielsen found Apple's touchscreen tablet held 82 percent of the tablet market in the U.S.

Today also marks 14 months since the iPad first launched in America, further highlighting the success of Apple's venture into the tablet space. Apple announced last month that total sales of the device had topped the 25 million milestone.

Why did they lump Android into one category instead of separating it out by device like they did with the Iphone and Ipad?
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Does "mobile browsing" not include WiFi??

That's the only reason I can see for not including the iPodTouch in the mix. On the other hand, if it doesn't include browsing via WiFi, that raises some other questions...

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

iPod Touch is included with the iPhone in the report

Thanks for the info. I think it's correct for them to include it, but wrong to not say so explicitly and disaggregate the numbers. The iPhone and iPodTouch are different devices!
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post #22 of 22
Last year MSFT allocated $500 M in marketing alone to catch up to iPhone / Android... all for a 0.2% share of the US mobile market. By any measure that's a colossal waste, even for Microsoft.
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