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Palm chief addresses poor TouchPad reviews, compares webOS to Apple's early Mac OS X

post #1 of 110
Thread Starter 
Former Palm CEO and current HP executive Jon Rubenstein sent a letter to employees addressing lukewarm reviews of its new TouchPad tablet, and suggested that criticism of its webOS operating system is similar to complaints reviewers had with early versions of Mac OS X.

The letter from Rubinstein, who is senior vice president and general manager of HP's Palm Global Business Unit, came in response to reviews that characterized the newly launched TouchPad as a "mediocre tablet." Reviewers were impressed with the look of the TouchPad, but took issue with the device's weight, bugs, and lack of applications.

Rubinstein's letter, shared by Precentral.net (via Daring Fireball), stresses the positive and states that the industry "understand's HP's vision," seeing the "same potential in webOS." He also said that issues highlighted by reviewers are already known at HP, and will be addressed quickly with over-the-air updates.

"We still have work to do to make webOS the platform we know it can be, but remember... it's a marathon, not a sprint," Rubinstein wrote.

He then shared a trio of quotes from reviews from a different piece of software that launched more than 10 years ago: Apple's own Mac OS X operating system. Those early reviews characterized the software as "sluggish," without any "quality apps," and "just not making sense."

"It's hard to believe those statements described Mac OS X -- a platform that would go on to change the landscape of Silicon Valley in ways that no one could have imagined," he said.

In closing, Rubinstein, highlighted what he sees as the "potential for greatness" in webOS. He believes that users of the TouchPad understand that potential as well, and with HP's commitment to webOS, the potential will become a reality.

Last year, HP bought Palm for $1.2 billion. The acquisition brought HP into the smartphone industry, where the Palm Pre and other devices aim to compete with Apple's iPhone.

Prior to joining Palm, Rubinstein played an important role at Apple as the head of the company's iPod division. Rubinstein was instrumental in the creation of the iPod and discovered the portable hard drives that were used in the first models.



Rubinstein's entire e-mail, sent out internally at HP to the company's staff last week, is included below:

Team,

Today we bring the HP TouchPad and webOS 3.0 to the world. The HP team has achieved something extraordinary especially when you consider that its been just one year since our work on the TouchPad began in earnest. Today also marks the start of a new era for HP as our vision for connected mobility begins to take form - an ecosystem of services, applications and devices connected seamlessly by webOS.

If youve seen the recent TouchPad reviews you know that the industry understands HPs vision and sees the same potential in webOS as we do. David Pogue from the New York Times says there are signs of greatness here. (Ive included links to Davids review and others below.) Youve also seen that reviewers rightly note things we need to improve about the webOS experience. The good news is that most of the issues they cite are already known to us and will be addressed in short order by over-the-air software and app catalog updates. We still have work to do to make webOS the platform we know it can be, but remember..its a marathon, not a sprint.

In that spirit, Richard Kerris, head of worldwide developer relations for webOS, reminded me yesterday of the first reviews for a product introduced a little over ten years ago:

"...overall the software is sluggish"
"...there are no quality apps to use, so it wont last"
"...it's just not making sense...."

Its hard to believe these statements described MacOS X - a platform that would go on to change the landscape of Silicon Valley in ways that no one could have imagined.

The similarities to our situation are obvious, but theres also a big difference. Like David Pogue, our audiences get that webOS has the potential for greatness. And like me, they know that your hard work and passion, and the power of HPs commitment to webOS, will turn that potential into the real thing.
post #2 of 110
The question is: How much is HP willing to lose (i.e., invest) before they give up?
post #3 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


"We still have work to do to make webOS the platform we know it can be, but remember... it's a marathon, not a sprint," Rubinstein wrote.
[/url][/c]

A marathon in which they started running 2 years after others,so they better sprint all they way if they wanna get placed ( or somewhere near that)
post #4 of 110
I always wondered what the term "disgruntled former employee" meant in real-world usage. Jon Rubinstein's picture now appears in the Silicon Valley Tech Dictionary alongside the term. Good luck, Jon. Keep taking your anti-anxiety medication.
post #5 of 110
I cant believe that a-hole compared that crap tochpad to the early build of OSX.
This just goes to show how much Jon Rubinstein wanted the top spot at Apple. Jealous lil boy. HP failed. Hate that washed up PC maker with their cheap a** calculators.
post #6 of 110
In other words, its OK to bring a new beast to the table, but WebOS does not have OS9 fall back. This would be like saying iOS in 2007 was like 10.0, and 10.1, it was not. It was fast, smooth, and slick, yeah there new features desired and they came along, but the version iOS1.0 was pretty good and operational on day 1. I know I got one and it just kept getting better and better.

So HP is doing the Rim and Google Android/Chrome, that is, release a beta and eventually release a final product version 1 in a year or so. Its ironic that MS is more like Apple in trying to get out a quality product versus a beta and let the users sort it out.

This is tough call, it takes time [Apple took years and a lot of money, ergo their being pissed with Samsung copycats not competing] to master the performance in the meantime Apple gobbles up market and worst keeps moving the goal posts with improvements.

So HP, RIM, and Google have chosen get to market and fix the product later. Hopefully, Apple's inability to meet demand will persuade users to grab a beta and live with it.

I do find it ironic that HP and RIM get poor to middling reviews on their products and Google with equally poor hardware/software on tablets gets a pass, 'grading on the curve."

Observations may be reviewers are now embarrassed by their leaning over backward on Google and nailing HP and RIM.
post #7 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleGreen View Post

The question is: How much is HP willing to lose (i.e., invest) before they give up?

I think you're probably right. I welcome quality competition in the mobile OS space - it fosters more ideas from which we all benefit, but at the same time, HP is a business and they won't put up with losses for a long time.
post #8 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In that spirit, Richard Kerris, head of worldwide developer relations for webOS, reminded me yesterday of the first reviews for a product introduced a little over ten years ago:

"...there are no quality apps to use, so it wont last"

Its hard to believe these statements described MacOS X - a platform that would go on to change the landscape of Silicon Valley in ways that no one could have imagined.

Yeah, however there was Classic mode, so OS X Macs could still run legacy OS 9 (and earlier) applications.

The first really usable version of OS X was 10.2 Jaguar, launched in August 2002. By that time, there was an OS X version of Adobe Photoshop.
post #9 of 110
I think Jon Rubenstein just got it up the pooper by the HP board and they didn't use any lube.
post #10 of 110
Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
post #11 of 110
Does HP's tablet not look exactly like the iPad, save its underbelly color? Are you kidding? And CEO's so-called vision of interconnectedness? Has Apple not already achieved this? They're share of the worlds tablet air space is 1% (50 times more than any of its competitors) as reported by AppleInsider just yesterday. Hey CEO ... go back to the drawing "tablet" and start with an idea that's YOURS.
post #12 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleGreen View Post

The question is: How much is HP willing to lose (i.e., invest) before they give up?

That is exactly it, he maybe 100% correct but the difference is Steve was 100% all in on OSX they had no other choice. HP is not going to wait years to recovery the investment. At some point they will pull the plug if they do not see some reasonable return.

The question, is HP going after the all encompassing consumer market or is their plan to bundle this with the enterprise business solutions similar to RIM is doing with their play book.
post #13 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleGreen View Post

The question is: How much is HP willing to lose (i.e., invest) before they give up?

HP plays a long, slow game. Even if TouchPad doesn't sell at all, they will probably keep at it for a few years at least before they give up.

I like their chances myself.

WebOS is so much better than Android in terms of a fit to the market and the users. Android is proprietary, invasive, and primarily only useful for the young techie males it's aimed at. WebOS on the other hand is completely open (to balance the proprietary Apple system), and aimed at the entire market, not just the "I'm a tech head" subsection.

Overall, since Apple is likely to get the Lion's share of the entire market over time, having an alternative system that's very similar, but open, flexible, and based on open technology would be a great fit.
post #14 of 110
LOL...I love how they didn't site the source of the OS X review quotes...there were a lot of peeps who didn't want OS X to succeed 10 yrs ago...random quotes are meaningless.
post #15 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

I cant believe that a-hole compared that crap tochpad to the early build of OSX.
This just goes to show how much Jon Rubinstein wanted the top spot at Apple. Jealous lil boy. HP failed. Hate that washed up PC maker with their cheap a** calculators.

speaking of a-holes...
post #16 of 110
Sure it's a marathon Jon, but you didn't mention that it's an uphill one. Some things ARE better left unsaid I guess...
post #17 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by kabantum View Post

Does HP's tablet not look exactly like the iPad, save its underbelly color?

I think it's more of an iPad as re-imagined by Fisher Price.
post #18 of 110
Seriously guys I love my Apple hardware but you guys have extremely short memories.

For one he is right about OS/X, as nice as it is now it took awhile to get there. There where significant bugs that didn't get removed until Snow Leopard. However does anybody really expect bug free releases of things as complicated as an OS and the attendant SDKs?

The same goes for iOS. If any of you where involved in the first SDK release you will know what I'm talking about. Apple had many iOS releases in quick succession to deal with significant bugs.

IPad is actually an exception for Apple as it has had a very stable OS from release. Most likely that is due to all the "public" debugging seen with iPhone. In the end this tablet is no different than any other rev one product.

On the otherhand people do gave some very positive things to say about HPs new tablet. Sadly we have deteriorated into a culture of negativity, so much so people can't even balance pros and cons anymore. Frankly I could come up with all sorts of things people see as negatives with the iPad, but why reinforce defective thinking?

Worst people have already made up their mind that TouchPad is a failure. That is a big mistake in my mind. You can be pretty sure Apple is already looking over TouchPad if for nothing else to better understand their weaknesses relative to TouchPad.

Being a fan boi is one thing but blinding yourself to what is happening in the rest of the industry is pretty stupid. Besides it is in Apples best interest to have an non Android competitor.
post #19 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by maccherry View Post

I cant believe that a-hole compared that crap tochpad to the early build of OSX.
This just goes to show how much Jon Rubinstein wanted the top spot at Apple. Jealous lil boy. HP failed. Hate that washed up PC maker with their cheap a** calculators.

Grow up you dim-wit... what have you done with your life so far? You also clearly know nothing about HP, which as well as building 'cheap-a** calculators' also builds printers, offers consulting services (I have two HP consultants working for me right now) as well as systems architecture solutions, server solutions, support desk implementations etc.

Apple doesn't offer any of that, and doesn't want to either - but the comparison with the 10.0 and even 10.1 versions of OS X is extremely valid. One could argue that OS X wasn't really OS X until 10.3 or even 10.4 (Core Audio, Core Animation, Expose, Spotlight) - basically all those things that people today would argue 'defines' the OS X experience. NONE of them existed in 10.0...

Some of the other posts here are even worse than yours; I can't even be bothered there.

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Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
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post #20 of 110
To be fair to this guy what he said is true. I switched to Mac very early on but it was Tiger that really put the finishing touches to make it a great OS.

That being said though, whats really made Apple and OS X successful is iPod and iPhones. If it wern't for those Mac sales wouldn't be increasing as they are now. I don't see HP having much success with this as there's no actual reason to switch to it.
post #21 of 110
The similarities are intriguing. Abandoning an old, outdated OS with a reasonable level of success for a new, shiny, buggy, sluggish OS with no applications with only a highly dedicated, bordering on insanely loyal, fandom.

I don't know if HP can deliver though.
post #22 of 110
I can see why he said it and all that from his perspective but it is a poor comparison and is lame to say the least. iOS was ground breaking and original. Apple were not copying someone else. It would be like a bunch of Englishman landing in Plymouth, Massachusetts today and having a hard time getting a meal saying, Oh well the Pilgrims had a hard time too.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #23 of 110
Even some sort of success and failure is being compared to Apple. They really can't be original. I mean Windows Phones don't look anything like iPhone and I give a big applaud to Microsoft for looking in a different direction (good or bad). But I don't see anything radically exciting or new with this bought up Palm project. The vision is there, but that vision was Apple's back in 2007.
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post #24 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Seriously guys I love my Apple hardware but you guys have extremely short memories.

For one he is right about OS/X, as nice as it is now it took awhile to get there. There where significant bugs that didn't get removed until Snow Leopard. However does anybody really expect bug free releases of things as complicated as an OS and the attendant SDKs?

The same goes for iOS. If any of you where involved in the first SDK release you will know what I'm talking about. Apple had many iOS releases in quick succession to deal with significant bugs.

IPad is actually an exception for Apple as it has had a very stable OS from release. Most likely that is due to all the "public" debugging seen with iPhone. In the end this tablet is no different than any other rev one product.

On the otherhand people do gave some very positive things to say about HPs new tablet. Sadly we have deteriorated into a culture of negativity, so much so people can't even balance pros and cons anymore. Frankly I could come up with all sorts of things people see as negatives with the iPad, but why reinforce defective thinking?

Worst people have already made up their mind that TouchPad is a failure. That is a big mistake in my mind. You can be pretty sure Apple is already looking over TouchPad if for nothing else to better understand their weaknesses relative to TouchPad.

Being a fan boi is one thing but blinding yourself to what is happening in the rest of the industry is pretty stupid. Besides it is in Apples best interest to have an non Android competitor.

I completely agree. So many here are so quick to write off his argument when in reality everything he said was true, and I for one think that webOS has potential.

Kudos to Jon and he makes great points. Hoping the best for him and webOS.
post #25 of 110
One of HP's problems is that they lack the vision to compare their operating system with OS X. When OS X came out, Apple still had several years of development planned.
post #26 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Seriously guys I love my Apple hardware but you guys have extremely short memories.

For one he is right about OS/X, as nice as it is now it took awhile to get there. There where significant bugs that didn't get removed until Snow Leopard. However does anybody really expect bug free releases of things as complicated as an OS and the attendant SDKs?

The same goes for iOS. If any of you where involved in the first SDK release you will know what I'm talking about. Apple had many iOS releases in quick succession to deal with significant bugs.

IPad is actually an exception for Apple as it has had a very stable OS from release. Most likely that is due to all the "public" debugging seen with iPhone. In the end this tablet is no different than any other rev one product.

On the otherhand people do gave some very positive things to say about HPs new tablet. Sadly we have deteriorated into a culture of negativity, so much so people can't even balance pros and cons anymore. Frankly I could come up with all sorts of things people see as negatives with the iPad, but why reinforce defective thinking?

Worst people have already made up their mind that TouchPad is a failure. That is a big mistake in my mind. You can be pretty sure Apple is already looking over TouchPad if for nothing else to better understand their weaknesses relative to TouchPad.

Being a fan boi is one thing but blinding yourself to what is happening in the rest of the industry is pretty stupid. Besides it is in Apples best interest to have an non Android competitor.

I only have Snow Leopard running on Win 7 x64 in VMWare. I have never used OS X. My understanding is that OS X is Next, but it was also the first version after quite a bit of work. WebOS is the third version of WebOS and, after a year of work, on much faster hardware than the Pre, still suffers from performance problems.

HP released WebOS in 2009. So, they had *ALL* of the development time up to 2009 and the 2010 to 2011 time to put it on a tablet, PLUS much faster HW and a gig of ram(probably 4 to 8 times the original) and it STILL is slow.

That doesn't bode well for WebOS. Apple did not release quick releases of the iPhoneOS for iPad. And it came out the door fast. The TouchPad had all the benefits of time, hardware, hindsight and good-will and it still fell short.

As for coming up with all sorts of things that people see as negatives in the iPad? Who cares? It is selling 25+ million units. The proof, as they say, is in the pudding.
post #27 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Seriously guys I love my Apple hardware but you guys have extremely short memories.

For one he is right about OS/X, as nice as it is now it took awhile to get there.

Finally, it took eighteen comments to get to some common sense. From what I remember OS X didn't really get usable until about 10.3. I thought it was funny when someone said they have OS 9 to fall back on. How is a quite old legacy OS like OS 9 a fall back plan? I fail to see how OS 9 could compete around a time when MS finally started to get their act together with the stable Windows XP. I know people here don't want to give credit to anything Windows but the one thing you could say about XP was that it finally got stable. OS 9 would have had a hard time competing.
post #28 of 110
Problem is Jon Rubenstein is no Steve Jobs and HP is definitely not Apple.
post #29 of 110
Maybe it's time for HP to start reselling the iPad as they did the iPod back in 2004. A quote from that era:

Quote:
HP Chairman and CEO Carly Fiorina said in a statement that the company had explored other alternatives in making its own digital player and jukebox but "concluded Apple's iPod music player and iTunes music service were the best by far."
post #30 of 110
Competition is the best thing for Apple to keep them moving forward.

HP may well fail, but despite the noted weaknesses, I think this looks like it has some definite potential to eventually compete.
post #31 of 110
Back then, MacOS X 10.0 leapfrogged the competition [Win98]. It may have been incomplete, and not particularly stable, but it laid the foundation of things to come. It wasn't just an attempt to get something out there to try to join the party everybody else was having.

WebOS is just trying to latch onto the party. It's trying to catch both Android and iOS, both of which are currently better supported and significantly more established.

HP WISHES the situation was like they describe, but it's not. They aren't revamping their products to stay ahead. They bought an OS to try to catch up (and to try to more closely copy Apple's VERY successful business model).
post #32 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

HP plays a long, slow game. Even if TouchPad doesn't sell at all, they will probably keep at it for a few years at least before they give up.

I like their chances myself.

WebOS is so much better than Android in terms of a fit to the market and the users. Android is proprietary, invasive, and primarily only useful for the young techie males it's aimed at. WebOS on the other hand is completely open (to balance the proprietary Apple system), and aimed at the entire market, not just the "I'm a tech head" subsection.

Overall, since Apple is likely to get the Lion's share of the entire market over time, having an alternative system that's very similar, but open, flexible, and based on open technology would be a great fit.

I too think webOS has some strong potential, and HP has the legs and the resources to make it happen. HP also has a vested interest in seeing if webOS can be supported on the desktop as well - giving them some leverage against Microsoft, or at least an alternative. Of anyone, including Google, HP is best positioned to be an ecosystem competitor to Apple, and a serious threat to Android. If webOS can deliver performance, a nice GUI and a solid set of scalable apps - it could threaten Android, RIM and cut the legs out from under WinPhone 7 as well. There's certainly room for webOS in the "tablet" space, and if they can bring a solid ecosystem to challenge the ChromeOS, they could potentially own what remains of the netbook niche.

Whether Jon can bring the focus and demand for quality over time remains to be seen. There's plenty of potential here for HP to squander. It will be HP's corporate culture that may end up undermining webOS, more than anything else.
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post #33 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Seriously guys I love my Apple hardware but you guys have extremely short memories.

For one he is right about OS/X, as nice as it is now it took awhile to get there. There where significant bugs that didn't get removed until Snow Leopard. However does anybody really expect bug free releases of things as complicated as an OS and the attendant SDKs?

The same goes for iOS. If any of you where involved in the first SDK release you will know what I'm talking about. Apple had many iOS releases in quick succession to deal with significant bugs.

IPad is actually an exception for Apple as it has had a very stable OS from release. Most likely that is due to all the "public" debugging seen with iPhone. In the end this tablet is no different than any other rev one product.

On the otherhand people do gave some very positive things to say about HPs new tablet. Sadly we have deteriorated into a culture of negativity, so much so people can't even balance pros and cons anymore. Frankly I could come up with all sorts of things people see as negatives with the iPad, but why reinforce defective thinking?

Worst people have already made up their mind that TouchPad is a failure. That is a big mistake in my mind. You can be pretty sure Apple is already looking over TouchPad if for nothing else to better understand their weaknesses relative to TouchPad.

Being a fan boi is one thing but blinding yourself to what is happening in the rest of the industry is pretty stupid. Besides it is in Apples best interest to have an non Android competitor.

I second that.
post #34 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Grow up you dim-wit... what have you done with your life so far? You also clearly know nothing about HP, which as well as building 'cheap-a** calculators' also builds printers, offers consulting services (I have two HP consultants working for me right now) as well as systems architecture solutions, server solutions, support desk implementations etc.

Apple doesn't offer any of that, and doesn't want to either - but the comparison with the 10.0 and even 10.1 versions of OS X is extremely valid. One could argue that OS X wasn't really OS X until 10.3 or even 10.4 (Core Audio, Core Animation, Expose, Spotlight) - basically all those things that people today would argue 'defines' the OS X experience. NONE of them existed in 10.0...

Some of the other posts here are even worse than yours; I can't even be bothered there.

I second that one also.
post #35 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by TokyoJimu View Post

Maybe it's time for HP to start reselling the iPad as they did the iPod back in 2004. A quote from that era:

Carly Fiorina was a good CEO haha, but nowadays Apple doesn't need anyone else to sell their products for them
post #36 of 110
Whether you fan boys and girls like it or not, Web OS has potential. It will take time, let's say 3-4 years. But in the end, it will come.
It is indeed a marathon and if they improve the UI, make it stable and please developers, it'll be successful. You guys need a good reality check!!!
Apple does not do everything right. Look at how tight they keep the grip on apps. They decide what is on YOUR phone. This is wrong. Wake up people.
Now don't serve me the reason that it's about quality!!! They can easily make a button leading to a section on your phone for "non-appstore" app.
Then if the user is willing to go that road, no Apple support would be provided for these apps. Basically the users would be on their own on that path.
If HP design such a solution to maintain quality and freedom, then Apple has competiion. The market can't afford 1 single dominant player anyway.
post #37 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

Seriously guys I love my Apple hardware but you guys have extremely short memories.

For one he is right about OS/X, as nice as it is now it took awhile to get there. There where significant bugs that didn't get removed until Snow Leopard. However does anybody really expect bug free releases of things as complicated as an OS and the attendant SDKs?

The same goes for iOS. If any of you where involved in the first SDK release you will know what I'm talking about. Apple had many iOS releases in quick succession to deal with significant bugs.

IPad is actually an exception for Apple as it has had a very stable OS from release. Most likely that is due to all the "public" debugging seen with iPhone. In the end this tablet is no different than any other rev one product.

On the otherhand people do gave some very positive things to say about HPs new tablet. Sadly we have deteriorated into a culture of negativity, so much so people can't even balance pros and cons anymore. Frankly I could come up with all sorts of things people see as negatives with the iPad, but why reinforce defective thinking?

Worst people have already made up their mind that TouchPad is a failure. That is a big mistake in my mind. You can be pretty sure Apple is already looking over TouchPad if for nothing else to better understand their weaknesses relative to TouchPad.

Being a fan boi is one thing but blinding yourself to what is happening in the rest of the industry is pretty stupid. Besides it is in Apples best interest to have an non Android competitor.

While I agree that some are being somewhat short sighted, there are a some counterpoints to your argument.

First, as has been mentioned, when OS X first shipped, there was the Classic fallback. You could experiment with OS X while still being productive with OS 9. Throughout OS X's development, Apple has been mindful of transitions. Also, OS X had a few key features that differentiated it enough to Windows users, including security and ease of use, not to mention Apple's unique hardware products that were fully integrated with the OS. There aren't enough differences between webOS and iOS right now to sway the general consumer on taking a rather expensive bet on a unproven platform.

More importantly though, is the fact that the landscape of when OS X entered the market and when the TouchPad/webOS have entered their respective market, is vastly different. OS X came into a market that had a slower pace of change and only one dominant competitor. Desktop operating systems haven't truly changed at their conceptual core for quite some time. Mobile is changing at a much quicker pace.

Sure, when iPhone/iOS were first released, they weren't perfect, but they were good enough compared to the rest of the markets offerings at that time. Now iOS has had years of optimization, strong market share and more importantly, massive mindshare. While HP is working on optimizing webOS, the rest of the market, including Apple, will also be aggressively improving their products. The mobile space is quite different than when OS X came to market. Competition is much tougher and the stakes right now are much higher. HP has the cash to go all in if it sees fit, but it's hard to know how long it will take to gain serious traction. Apple is exponentially much further in this race and HP has some serious catching up to do.

I will say this. I think webOS has great potential. I hope HP sticks to its guns and is focused on making webOS a serious competitor. It has the foundation to do well, it just needs some good guidance. Having said that, I am a little worried with their talk of licensing webOS so soon after releasing the TouchPad.

In the end, competition will only benefit the consumers.
post #38 of 110
1) Whether you think it's an apt comparison or not, don't ignore the free press WebOS and HP is getting just by comparing to Apple.

2) I'd think iPhone OS would be a better comparison since Apple didn't have another OS and the number of apps was considerably more limited since there wasn't an SDK and it not a decade old OS fork.

3) Off topic: has Sprint ever sponsored a marathon?
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post #39 of 110
I thought he sounded like a good leader, hitting the right notes. His job is hard, the product he's trying to schlep is half-baked, but it probably could be good with enough time. He has to try and keep morale up at his company, he has to try and retain talent and prevent a brain drain. At this point its the only way they'll ever be able to compete, especially if competing for them is still a couple years off.
post #40 of 110
Just what I was thingking. Also I'm not super sure, but I think the 10.0 version was called a "beta" and was free (or $20 with a discount on the first paid release.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by gprovida View Post

In other words, its OK to bring a new beast to the table, but WebOS does not have OS9 fall back. This would be like saying iOS in 2007 was like 10.0, and 10.1, it was not. It was fast, smooth, and slick, yeah there new features desired and they came along, but the version iOS1.0 was pretty good and operational on day 1. I know I got one and it just kept getting better and better.

So HP is doing the Rim and Google Android/Chrome, that is, release a beta and eventually release a final product version 1 in a year or so. Its ironic that MS is more like Apple in trying to get out a quality product versus a beta and let the users sort it out.

This is tough call, it takes time [Apple took years and a lot of money, ergo their being pissed with Samsung copycats not competing] to master the performance in the meantime Apple gobbles up market and worst keeps moving the goal posts with improvements.

So HP, RIM, and Google have chosen get to market and fix the product later. Hopefully, Apple's inability to meet demand will persuade users to grab a beta and live with it.

I do find it ironic that HP and RIM get poor to middling reviews on their products and Google with equally poor hardware/software on tablets gets a pass, 'grading on the curve."

Observations may be reviewers are now embarrassed by their leaning over backward on Google and nailing HP and RIM.
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