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IDC bumps 2011 tablet forecast to 53M as Apple’s iPad 2 dominates

post #1 of 85
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In spite of a seasonal drop in total tablet shipments in the first quarter of 2011, IDC raised its estimates for 2011 shipments to 53.5 million on the belief that Apples iPad 2 will continue to carry the tablet market.

Research group International Data Corp. issued its Worldwide Quarterly Media Tracker and eReader Tracker report for the March quarter last Friday, noting that overall shipments fell short of the predictions. The report emphasized the iPads success in the tablet space, noting that Apples iPad and the recently introduced iPad 2 continue to dominate the media tablet market, as other vendors have had a more difficult time finding market acceptance for their products.

But, it wasnt all good news for the Cupertino, Calif.-based company. According to IDC, the number of Apple shipments in the first quarter fell well below expectations. The group attributed the miss to supply-chain hiccups and the typical pre-release announcement of the iPad 2 several weeks before availability.

Apple has had difficulty meeting the overwhelming demand for the iPad 2. The company ended last quarter with a substantial backlog, though lead times for the device on its online store recently improved to just 3-5 days, down from estimates of 1-2 weeks.

The company sold 4.69 million iPads in the March quarter, short of Wall Street consensus expectations of 6.2 million. Given IDCs estimate of 7.2 million media tablets sold in the first quarter, Apples touchscreen tablet made up 65 percent of the market, down from 73 percent share last quarter.

Tablets running Googles Android mobile operating system grew to a 34 percent market share on a sequential increase of 8.2 points. On the e-reader side, Barnes & Nobles Nook Color dethroned Amazons Kindle to become the top-selling e-reader for the first time.

The report noted that the iPads primary competitors, Samsung and Motorola, have found moderate success by focusing on preexisting distribution partnerships with mobile phone retailers. However, consumer reluctance to sign up for 3G and 4G data plans for tablets has stunted sales for the mobile handset makers.

"Like the PC market, Media Tablets had a bit of a challenging quarter in Q1, as concerns about general macroeconomic issues and the post-holiday letdown took a toll on demand," said Bob O'Donnell, IDC Vice President, Clients and Displays. "We expect the rest of the year to be much stronger, but we believe vendors who continue to focus on the telco channel for distribution will face serious challenges."

Despite the first-quarter hiccups in the tablet market, IDC remained confident in continued growth of the industry, raising its projection for the year from 50.4 million units to 53.5 million units. "Although media tablet sales were not as high as expected in 1Q11 due to slower consumer demand, overall economic conditions, and supply-chain constraints, we believe with the entrance of competitive new devices in second half of 2011, the market will sell close to 53 million units for the year and continue to grow long-term," said research analyst Jennifer Song.

Competition in the market is expected to heat up even further over the next 12 months as a variety of new tablets join the fray. HP just released the webOS-based TouchPad, while Dell is collaborating with Microsoft on Windows tablets. Meanwhile, Apple is expected to deliver a new iPad, with recent reports suggesting that it will have a higher-resolution display.
post #2 of 85
I am not surprised. The iPad 2 is still hard to get in places. A friend of mine bought an iPad 2 a few days ago at one of the biggest Apple stores around and they didn't even have the color he wanted so he just settled for what they had in stock.
post #3 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

I am not surprised. The iPad 2 is still hard to get in places. A friend of mine bought an iPad 2 a few days ago at one of the biggest Apple stores around and they didn't even have the color he wanted so he just settled for what they had in stock.

That's not really due to supply, that's due to number of models and amount of stock held. The iPad comes in different sizes, colours and networks - which makes for a lot of models. The key indicator of supply issues is order time online, and that is 3-5 days now everywhere except Hong Kong.
post #4 of 85
I agree with the analyst for a change.
post #5 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

But, it wasn’t all good news for the Cupertino, Calif.-based company. According to IDC, the number of Apple shipments in the first quarter fell “well below expectations.” The group attributed the miss to “supply-chain hiccups” and the typical “pre-release announcement of the iPad 2 several weeks before availability.”

Apple has had difficulty meeting the overwhelming demand for the iPad 2. The company ended last quarter with a substantial backlog, though lead times for the device on its online store recently improved to just 3-5 days, down from estimates of 1-2 weeks.

The company sold 4.69 million iPads in the March quarter, short of Wall Street consensus expectations of 6.2 million. Given IDC’s estimate of 7.2 million media tablets sold in the first quarter, Apple’s touchscreen tablet made up 65 percent of the market, down from 73 percent share last quarter.

"Well below expectations" -- only because the analysts and IDC are idiots.

Apple sold just over 7 million tablets in the Christmas quarter. Who in their right mind expected them to sell 6.2 million in the first calendar quarter?

I suspect that the pre-release announcement probably had some effect and the slow start at getting iPad 2 out the door might have, as well. But, by far, the biggest factor is simple seasonality. Apple sells lots more of almost all products in the Christmas quarter than in the following quarter. And for a big gift item like the iPad, that difference is probably even greater.
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post #6 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Apple sold just over 7 million tablets in the Christmas quarter. Who in their right mind expected them to sell 6.2 million in the first calendar quarter?

While I don't disagree with you, I can see where they were coming from, and it was essentially an assumption that the iPad was supply limited. If so, it was possible that sales would hold up post-christmas, and indeed it's still not completely impossible because of course the iPad-2 was profoundly supply limited early on.

I think ultimately there's no doubt that the iPad will be strongly seasonal, in the way that the iPod is, but in the short term factors like supply and the overall growing market size could overwhelm that for the next few years.
post #7 of 85
I think his point was that the 4th quarter is the strongest quarter for most products because of the gift giving holidays. So, if Apple sold 6.1 million iPads in the 4th quarter, how could somebody reasonably expect Apple to sell 7 million in the 1st quarter?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

While I don't disagree with you, I can see where they were coming from, and it was essentially an assumption that the iPad was supply limited. If so, it was possible that sales would hold up post-christmas, and indeed it's still not completely impossible because of course the iPad-2 was profoundly supply limited early on.

I think ultimately there's no doubt that the iPad will be strongly seasonal, in the way that the iPod is, but in the short term factors like supply and the overall growing market size could overwhelm that for the next few years.
post #8 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

I think his point was that the 4th quarter is the strongest quarter for most products because of the gift giving holidays. So, if Apple sold 6.1 million iPads in the 4th quarter, how could somebody reasonably expect Apple to sell 7 million in the 1st quarter?

Because in any quarter Apple will sell min(supply,demand) units. Even if we assume that
Demand 10Q4 > Demand 11Q1, if Supply 11Q1 > Supply 10Q4 then sales could still rise if Demand 11Q1 > Supply 11Q1.

So the question becomes, could a person reasonably believe that demand outstripped supply in 10Q4? If so could they reasonably believe that it might continue to do so?
post #9 of 85
Think, think..


I think it is poor business to be making assumptions of a quarterly nature when there was less than/only four cycles of data and one to none of the quarter being assumed.

It isn't a PMP, phone or PC. So none of their data sets are really even relevant.

Seasonality... Fer f sake, the plant flowered once in observed history and thats some kind of statistical science.
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post #10 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

"Well below expectations" -- only because the analysts and IDC are idiots.

Apple sold just over 7 million tablets in the Christmas quarter. Who in their right mind expected them to sell 6.2 million in the first calendar quarter?

I suspect that the pre-release announcement probably had some effect and the slow start at getting iPad 2 out the door might have, as well. But, by far, the biggest factor is simple seasonality. Apple sells lots more of almost all products in the Christmas quarter than in the following quarter. And for a big gift item like the iPad, that difference is probably even greater.

next week IDC. Will be stunned. Apple will report at least 11 million iPads sold. It is game over and they know it, this is the MP3 all over again.
post #11 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Because in any quarter Apple will sell min(supply,demand) units. Even if we assume that
Demand 10Q4 > Demand 11Q1, if Supply 11Q1 > Supply 10Q4 then sales could still rise if Demand 11Q1 > Supply 11Q1.

So the question becomes, could a person reasonably believe that demand outstripped supply in 10Q4? If so could they reasonably believe that it might continue to do so?

March 11 is a big date; The quake added more stress to the already stressed supply chain and may have lopped 1 or 2 million iPads off the delivery docks.

-------------

added after reading 2:44 pm irnchriz below:

Totally agree w/ iPad 2 release slow down which also shipped on March 11th in the US.
post #12 of 85
The iPad figures were low for the first quarter of 2011 due to the release of the iPad 2 which slowed device sales prior to it's release and only being available for a few days at the end of the quarter.

Expect the figures on July 19th to be mind blowing.
post #13 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

The iPad figures were low for the first quarter of 2011 due to the release of the iPad 2 which slowed device sales prior to it's release and only being available for a few days at the end of the quarter.

Expect the figures on July 19th to be mind blowing.

I wonder how many countries have the iPad 2 for sale directly from Apple or their "official" affiliates?

I really feel the iPad arm of their business will eventually pull in more revenue than the iPhone arm within a couple years.
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post #14 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

The iPad figures were low for the first quarter of 2011 due to the release of the iPad 2 which slowed device sales prior to it's release and only being available for a few days at the end of the quarter.

Expect the figures on July 19th to be mind blowing.

So many people keep repeating the fallacy that the release of iPad 2 slowed the sales of iPad in Q1. The facts do not back that up. The official announcement of iPad 2 was March 2. It became available on March 11. By March, iPad sales was already soft compared to Christmas season. In fact, it was relatively soft all of Q1. You can argue anticipation of iPad 2 slowed sales of iPad (although this would be somewhat inconsistent with historic sales trends of iPhones and iPod Touch, which do tend to slow prior to the anticipated release of a new version but not always to a large degree), but you simply cannot say release of iPad 2 caused people to stop buying iPad.

I think a strong companion reason (along with anticipation for the new version) is that Apple slowed manufacturing of iPad to create capacity to produce iPad 2.
post #15 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

So many people keep repeating the fallacy that the release of iPad 2 slowed the sales of iPad in Q1. The facts do not back that up. The official announcement of iPad 2 was March 2. It became available on March 11. By March, iPad sales was already soft compared to Christmas season. In fact, it was relatively soft all of Q1. You can argue anticipation of iPad 2 slowed sales of iPad (although this would inconsistent with historic sales trends of iPhones and iPod Touch), but you simply cannot say release of iPad 2 caused people to stop buying iPad.

Uh... right.... new iPhones NEVER affect sales of the soon to be "old" model. Where have you been?
post #16 of 85
My wife went from "What did you buy that thing for? We don't need it" to being joined at the hip to it. Rather than run upstairs to her iMac, she keeps it on the couch in the family room where the TV is. She is constantly picking it up to look up to check the web for this and that. It's become the downstairs computer.

Steve got it right. Not too big to be moved around (especially within a house), and not too small to make surfing and app-ing easy and un-cramped.
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post #17 of 85
Android tablets have a 34% market share? Perhaps in units shipped to stores but there is no way that is the percentage purchased by users. The real number is much smaller than that.

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post #18 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Android tablets have a 34% market share? Perhaps in units shipped to stores but there is no way that is the percentage purchased by users. The real number is much smaller than that.

They may be selling better than many of us might expect. The Samsung Tab 10.1, Asus Transformer and Toshiba Thrive have iPad-equivalent or better hardware, more connectivity options, good build quality, comparable battery life, less expensive add-ons, and yet still manage to meet and/or significantly undercut Apple's iPad2 prices. Dedicated Apple fans may say they can't match the iOS experience. Buyers of those "other" tablets probably don't know that (or don't care if they do) considering the price/feature differences. And if you throw the Nook Color in there, which IMO serves the most common needs for most surfers and readers at just $249, and Apple's higher price is hard to justify for some buyers.
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post #19 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

Uh... right.... new iPhones NEVER affect sales of the soon to be "old" model. Where have you been?

Did you even read what I wrote? Literacy is a wonderful tool, even for tools.
post #20 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Did you even read what I wrote? Literacy is a wonderful tool, even for tools.

Yeah, you said "You can argue anticipation of iPad 2 slowed sales of iPad (although this would inconsistent with historic sales trends of iPhones and iPod Touch)" which is patently false. Iphone sales always fall off the table after the announcement of a new model, which directly contradicts your point.
post #21 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

Yeah, you said "You can argue anticipation of iPad 2 slowed sales of iPad (although this would inconsistent with historic sales trends of iPhones and iPod Touch)" which is patently false. Iphone sales always fall off the table after the announcement of a new model, which directly contradicts your point.

The sales might drop after the announcement (which we can't really know, only speculate), but we can see trends that show even after a year on the market the sales are still strong, even growing in sales despite being last year's tech and history of annual Summer releases.

For Q2-2011 the iPhone sales were 18.6M.
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post #22 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

Iphone sales always fall off the table after the announcement of a new model, which directly contradicts your point.

Link? The only model where I saw that happen clearly on the data I've seen was for the original model. The data in that graph is somewhat coarse though, so if you have something with finer granularity I'd be interested in seeing it. On this graph the IPhone-3 sales actually start to rise before the new model. The 3+3GS sales dip very slightly before the 4, but that could just be due to supply of 3s drying up.

Edit: deleted image - solipsism beat me to it
post #23 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Link? The only model where I saw that happen clearly on the data I've seen was for the original model. The data in that graph is somewhat coarse though, so if you have something with finer granularity I'd be interested in seeing it. On this graph the IPhone-3 sales actually start to rise before the new model. The 3+3GS sales dip very slightly before the 4, but that could just be due to supply of 3s drying up.

Edit: deleted image - solipsism beat me to it

The major drop off in sales from the original iPhone wasn't from people not buying it, but because Apple had stopped production and you couldn't buy it. I, NasserAE and countless others sold our used, original iPhones for more than we bought them for because of this drop in availability.
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post #24 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Link? The only model where I saw that happen clearly on the data I've seen was for the original model. The data in that graph is somewhat coarse though, so if you have something with finer granularity I'd be interested in seeing it. On this graph the IPhone-3 sales actually start to rise before the new model. The 3+3GS sales dip very slightly before the 4, but that could just be due to supply of 3s drying up.

Edit: deleted image - solipsism beat me to it

The OP stated that iPhone sales don't slow down going into a new model. While there are not a lot of data points, the data points all point in one direction, and that is a slow-down in the last few weeks or month before the day of the new iPhone launch. I don't need a link - I've been alive for the past 4 years in June when you practically couldn't find the old model (iPhone, iPhone 3G). Something everyone "knew" all of a sudden becomes in question because I guess it now points against something everyone wants to be true? That the iPad 1 sales were not impacted by its phasing out? OKeeeeee
post #25 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The major drop off in sales from the original iPhone wasn't from people not buying it, but because Apple had stopped production and you couldn't buy it. I, NasserAE and countless others sold our used, original iPhones for more than we bought them for because of this drop in availability.

Exactly. It was never a question of why it happened, the OP just said that iPhone sales didn't dry up. They did!
post #26 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

The sales might drop after the announcement (which we can't really know, only speculate), but we can see trends that show even after a year on the market the sales are still strong, even growing in sales despite being last year's tech and history of annual Summer releases.

For Q2-2011 the iPhone sales were 18.6M.

By the way your chart shows zero examples of the bolded text above, but 4 examples of sales dropping during the summer. This year was the only year that Q2 was better than Q1, and I think we can all agree that that was thanks to Verizon.

Edit: I'm unclear, anyway, on what these quarters are? Are they calendar quarters, or Apple's fiscal quarters? How in 2010 was Q3 lower than Q2, which was lower than Q1? Was the ramp of iP4 that poor in Q3?
post #27 of 85
IDC reports OEM shipments as if they were actual sales. of course they are not. and that is what their market totals are based on. so they're junk numbers.

Apple just reports actual sales. i haven't seen any other OEM report of actual tablet sales to consumers/businesses. gee, i wonder why.

IDC is the same outfit that predicts Windows Phone 7 will overtake the iPhone in sales in two years. while also getting paid by MS for services of some kind. gee, i wonder why.
post #28 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

By the way your chart shows zero examples of the bolded text above, but 4 examples of sales dropping during the summer. This year was the only year that Q2 was better than Q1, and I think we can all agree that that was thanks to Verizon.

Edit: I'm unclear, anyway, on what these quarters are? Are they calendar quarters, or Apple's fiscal quarters? How in 2010 was Q3 lower than Q2, which was lower than Q1? Was the ramp of iP4 that poor in Q3?

1) Those are fiscal quarters. You can ascertain that by looking at Q3-2007 when the iPhone went on sale in the last weekend in June.

2) The colours represent each new iPhone model. As the chart indicates the quarters the iPhone 3GS was prime increased since their first full quarter (Q4-2009) of sales, it didn't decline with each subsequent quarter because it was less new. It even grew very slightly by 150k units for the quarter following the holiday quarter, which is impressive.

3) So for the iPhone 4's reign as prime they've increased their unit sales by over 2 million each consecutive quarter, even as the iPad 2 came out. Based on the growth in the smartphone sector I wouldn't be surprised if they best it by another 2 million units for fiscal Q3-2011.
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post #29 of 85
I really don't understand these analysts. They are making all of these 'matter of fact' statements that are purely based on their, more than often, ridiculous projections. I find it difficult to read these articles without a little smirk and a head shake.
post #30 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

IDC reports OEM shipments as if they were actual sales. of course they are not. and that is what their market totals are based on. so they're junk numbers.

Apple just reports actual sales. i haven't seen any other OEM report of actual tablet sales to consumers/businesses. gee, i wonder why.

IDC is the same outfit that predicts Windows Phone 7 will overtake the iPhone in sales in two years. while also getting paid by MS for services of some kind. gee, i wonder why.

I realize it's easy to assume that IDC is intentionally boosting Android/MS for nefarious or financial reasons, but it isn't necessarily the case. Back during my misspent youth as a physics grad student I took a course in cosmology, and I still remember how, on the very first day, the professor made several heroic assumptions about the universe. I remember a guy asking why we made these assumptions, and the professor replied that we had to, if we didn't we really couldn't get anywhere at all. The entire field of cosmology is built on these approximations and if the universe is radically different than that then we're just stuffed.

Often analysts end up making similarly huge assumptions, such as that product shipped is a good indication of product sold, or that Nokia will carry their market share over to WP7, and I suspect it's for the same reason. If they didn't make them then they wouldn't be able to do anything at all.

The really bad thing is when they make these huge assumptions and don't note it anywhere in the analysis.
post #31 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

They may be selling better than many of us might expect. The Samsung Tab 10.1, Asus Transformer and Toshiba Thrive have iPad-equivalent or better hardware, more connectivity options, good build quality, comparable battery life, less expensive add-ons, and yet still manage to meet and/or significantly undercut Apple's iPad2 prices. Dedicated Apple fans may say they can't match the iOS experience. Buyers of those "other" tablets probably don't know that (or don't care if they do) considering the price/feature differences. And if you throw the Nook Color in there, which IMO serves the most common needs for most surfers and readers at just $249, and Apple's higher price is hard to justify for some buyers.

Nice try.

Oh I get it. These consumers love their devices so much they can't put them down, and they don't want to leave the house for fear of being stolen. This is why no one ever sees one of these devices in actual use.
post #32 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

They may be selling better than many of us might expect. The Samsung Tab 10.1, Asus Transformer and Toshiba Thrive ...

I think we can safely dismiss the Toshiba Thrive seeing as it hasn't even launched yet, can't imagine vast numbers of people pre-ordered a tablet that they've never seen and has never been reviewed in a major paper.

Admittedly it may have sold as many units as the Samsung 10.1 or the Asus Transformer
post #33 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

Yeah, you said "You can argue anticipation of iPad 2 slowed sales of iPad (although this would inconsistent with historic sales trends of iPhones and iPod Touch)" which is patently false. Iphone sales always fall off the table after the announcement of a new model, which directly contradicts your point.

Nice trick to take part of my quote and use it as ammo. But let's take my key point in its entirety:

"You can argue anticipation of iPad 2 slowed sales of iPad (...), but you simply cannot say release of iPad 2 caused people to stop buying iPad."

I will add back the iPhone reference later. This main point above is absolutely irrefutable because iPad2 was announced on March 2. An announcement at this date cannot possibly account for slower sales in Jan and Feb, unless a time machine was involved. That is why I wrote that "anticipation of iPad2" can possibly be construed as cause but not the actual announcement.

But even the anticipation of iPad2 is questionable as a cause because no one, absolutely no one but Apple, knew when the announcement was forthcoming. As for the history of iPhone announcement, etc., I think there is enough data here for you to properly understand history. So no need for me to further embarrass you.
post #34 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stourque View Post

Nice try.

Oh I get it. These consumers love their devices so much they can't put them down, and they don't want to leave the house for fear of being stolen. This is why no one ever sees one of these devices in actual use.

The near total absence of Android tablets is indeed astounding. I was in the San Jose airport over Christmas, waiting for a plane to take us to Porto Jimenez. There was 20+ people in the small room, and 8 iPads. Sure, that was before Xoom, Playbook, etc. emerged. Well, I have been traveling regularly since then and, based on my observations, iPads are often equal to laptops in numbers in airports. And I still have not seen a non-iPad tablet yet in the airports of Houston, Chicago, New York, Toronto, Ottawa, Seattle. Have not seen them in Starbucks. Pretty much the only place I have seen them is inside a glass case in Best Buy.
post #35 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Nice trick to take part of my quote and use it as ammo. But let's take my key point in its entirety:

"You can argue anticipation of iPad 2 slowed sales of iPad (...), but you simply cannot say release of iPad 2 caused people to stop buying iPad."

I will add back the iPhone reference later. This main point above is absolutely irrefutable because iPad2 was announced on March 2. An announcement at this date cannot possibly account for slower sales in Jan and Feb, unless a time machine was involved. That is why I wrote that "anticipation of iPad2" can possibly be construed as cause but not the actual announcement.

But even the anticipation of iPad2 is questionable as a cause because no one, absolutely no one but Apple, knew when the announcement was forthcoming. As for the history of iPhone announcement, etc., I think there is enough data here for you to properly understand history. So no need for me to further embarrass you.

It wasn't a trick. It's a shame when you put something down on paper, get called for it, and still try to explain it away.

Oh cmon don't stop embarrassing me! You're so good at it! Ha!
post #36 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

I think we can safely dismiss the Toshiba Thrive seeing as it hasn't even launched yet. . .

I watched two go out the door within a few minutes today at Office Depot. Best Buy also had it featured on the front page of their Sunday flyer. But agreed it's not likely to have made much of a market impact yet. I listed it simply as an example of a full size tablet with as good or better hardware and connectivity than Apple's product, but still retailing for less.
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post #37 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

I watched two go out the door within a few minutes today at Office Depot. Best Buy also had it featured on the front page of their Sunday flyer. But agreed it's not likely to have made much of a market impact yet. I listed it simply as an example of a full size tablet with as good or better hardware and connectivity than Apple's product, but still retailing for less.

As good or better?

Weight 130g more.
Depth 16mm to the iPad-2s 9mm

The CPU, memory etc are comparable I'll grant you, but the physical specs are way way worse. The only Android tablet that genuinely competes right now on specs is the 10.1 Samsung.
post #38 of 85
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post #39 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In spite of a seasonal drop in total tablet shipments in the first quarter of 2011, IDC raised its estimates for 2011 shipments to 53.5 million on the belief that Apples iPad 2 will continue to carry the tablet market.

Research group International Data Corp. issued its Worldwide Quarterly Media Tracker and eReader Tracker report for the March quarter last Friday, noting that overall shipments fell short of the predictions. The report emphasized the iPads success in the tablet space, noting that Apples iPad and the recently introduced iPad 2 continue to dominate the media tablet market, as other vendors have had a more difficult time finding market acceptance for their products.

But, it wasnt all good news for the Cupertino, Calif.-based company. According to IDC, the number of Apple shipments in the first quarter fell well below expectations. The group attributed the miss to supply-chain hiccups and the typical pre-release announcement of the iPad 2 several weeks before availability.

Apple has had difficulty meeting the overwhelming demand for the iPad 2. The company ended last quarter with a substantial backlog, though lead times for the device on its online store recently improved to just 3-5 days, down from estimates of 1-2 weeks.

The company sold 4.69 million iPads in the March quarter, short of Wall Street consensus expectations of 6.2 million. Given IDCs estimate of 7.2 million media tablets sold in the first quarter, Apples touchscreen tablet made up 65 percent of the market, down from 73 percent share last quarter.

Tablets running Googles Android mobile operating system grew to a 34 percent market share on a sequential increase of 8.2 points. On the e-reader side, Barnes & Nobles Nook Color dethroned Amazons Kindle to become the top-selling e-reader for the first time.

The report noted that the iPads primary competitors, Samsung and Motorola, have found moderate success by focusing on preexisting distribution partnerships with mobile phone retailers. However, consumer reluctance to sign up for 3G and 4G data plans for tablets has stunted sales for the mobile handset makers.

"Like the PC market, Media Tablets had a bit of a challenging quarter in Q1, as concerns about general macroeconomic issues and the post-holiday letdown took a toll on demand," said Bob O'Donnell, IDC Vice President, Clients and Displays. "We expect the rest of the year to be much stronger, but we believe vendors who continue to focus on the telco channel for distribution will face serious challenges."

Despite the first-quarter hiccups in the tablet market, IDC remained confident in continued growth of the industry, raising its projection for the year from 50.4 million units to 53.5 million units. "Although media tablet sales were not as high as expected in 1Q11 due to slower consumer demand, overall economic conditions, and supply-chain constraints, we believe with the entrance of competitive new devices in second half of 2011, the market will sell close to 53 million units for the year and continue to grow long-term," said research analyst Jennifer Song.

Competition in the market is expected to heat up even further over the next 12 months as a variety of new tablets join the fray. HP just released the webOS-based TouchPad, while Dell is collaborating with Microsoft on Windows tablets. Meanwhile, Apple is expected to deliver a new iPad, with recent reports suggesting that it will have a higher-resolution display.

55 million
wow thats a lot of ipads


9
whats in a name ? 
beatles
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whats in a name ? 
beatles
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Originally Posted by brucep View Post

55 million
wow thats a lot of ipads

Around half a square kilometer of screen.
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