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iPad 2, Verizon iPhone took wind out of Android's sail with developers

post #1 of 59
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The launch of the iPad 2 and Verizon iPhone helped Apple's iOS take away some developer support from Google's Android platform, according to a new report.

The number of new project starts on Android from developers dropped from a 36 percent share in the first quarter of calendar 2011 to a 28 percent share in the second quarter, according to the latest data from Flurry Analytics. The information comes from about 20,000 applications that featured Flurry Analytics and were added between January and June of 2011.

The figures suggest that the release of the iPhone on Verizon and the launch of the iPad 2, Apple was able to reverse the advance of Android developer momentum. It represents the first time in a year that the trends have reversed.

Android's losses in new product starts were Apple's gains. The iPhone went from a 54 percent share in the first quarter of 2011 to a 57 percent share, while the iPad increased from 10 percent to 15 percent with a boost in developer interest.

The loss in developer support for new projects, at least according to Flurry, comes as activation of new Android devices continues to surge. In June, Google Vice President of Engineering Andy Rubin revealed that there are now more than a half-million Android devices activated every day, and that number is growing at 4.4 percent worldwide.

But while numerous signs point to the fact that Android devices, available in multiple form factors and configurations from numerous hardware makers, are setting the pace in the mobile industry, Apple is still the dominant player when it comes to mobile applications. The iOS App Store is the largest of its kind, with 425,000 applications, of which 100,000 are natively optimized for the iPad.

Users also download more applications on iOS devices than with the competition. Earlier this month, Apple revealed that it had reached a new milestone with more than 15 billion applications downloaded by users, a number that continues to grow at a rate of one billion per month.



Applications, particularly paid ones, are a crucial element to Apple's success with iOS. Various reports have found that it is much easier for developers to sell applications on Apple's App Store, while software for Android is more likely to be free and supported by advertising.

One analysis from earlier this week concluded that the average iOS user owns about $100 worth of content per Apple device, via purchases made through iTunes and the App Store. It was said that users' investment in software makes it increasingly difficult for them to justify switching to a competing platform, like Android, where they would need to reacquire those applications.

Offering his own take on the data, Flurry's Charles Newark-French said that despite Android's rapidly growing user base, Google needs to improve the layout of the Android Market and drive adoption of Google Checkout for simple payment processing if it wants to compete with Apple's App Store.

"Further, the development community is concerned about the rising cost of deploying across the Android installed base, due to the double whammy of OS and store fragmentation," he wrote. "With developers pinched on both sides of the revenue and cost equation, Google must tack aggressively at this stage of the race to assure that Apple doesn't continue to take its developer-support wind."
post #2 of 59
Unfortunately for Android and Google the royalty fees from Microsoft and potentially Oracle will further do damage. We may see HTC and the likes abandon Android for Windows Phone 7 and WebOS.
post #3 of 59
Apple may not be able to prevent users from buying Android devices (either because Apple doesn't play in that market or at that price point), but they can strongly affect whether developers give Android any attention. Over the long run this will make Android a less compelling platform and in effect marginalize if not starve that beast.

They need to keep this up by increasing the frequency of iOS hardware releases, which appears to be what they're doing. Major hardware releases every 6 months instead of every year. Keep these pie graphs right around 3/4 or 4/5ths new development for iOS for the next year or 2 and Android will cease to be viable competition.
post #4 of 59
There is no question Android devices are making great gains in the market. But as an owner of both an iOS and an Android device, it is obvious that iOS devices have much better apps.

And frankly, to the common consumer, the apps make the device.

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post #5 of 59
I think developer interest is key when it comes to tablets. Phones are kind of their own thing, and I think that for most people email, chat and a browser (with whatever necessary game du jour ala Angry Birds) pretty much covers it. Add in social networking and you're good.

But if you're going to bother with a tablet, particularly since your phone can presumably already do all of the above, you're going to be looking for something more. Apple and some Apple only devs have taken the trouble to make some really, really nice apps for the iPad, which not only look and function really well but allow you to do more.

If Android can't attract high quality developers to the tablet market, who are willing to make some sizable investment to provide functionality beyond a Twitter app or bare bones drawing program, Android tablets will come to be seen as second rate, not because of the hardware, but because of the software. And, of course, that becomes a vicious circle with poor software choice repressing sales and low sales discouraging development.
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post #6 of 59
^ Well said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by REC View Post

They need to keep this up by increasing the frequency of iOS hardware releases, which appears to be what they're doing. Major hardware releases every 6 months instead of every year.

No. One a year is plenty. They sell every one they can build, they don't need to introduce a new model mid-year. Not to mention it would steal the spotlight from their other products. Apple has hits every quarter.

The only thing I'd like sped up, is the frequency of iOS (and OS X) software updates.
post #7 of 59
It doesn't help Google that they are absolutely nowhere to be seen on the Lodsys issue. Apple is issuing C&Ds to Lodsys and bringing lawyers to bear. Given the speed with which the wheels of justice turn it may not be able to stop Lodsys forcing some developers to cough up, but nevertheless it induces a feeling that Apple cares about protecting developers from trolls.

Once again Google's cavalier attitude towards IP is biting their ass.
post #8 of 59
I'm not here to dispute the article and the findings of Flurry or whatever.

I just found it funny that this morning I read on 9to5google.com a post with the following headline...

WhitePages prioritizes Android over Apples long approval process (UPDATE: Google Ventures, too)

versus AI's headline...

iPad 2, Verizon iPhone took wind out of Android's sail with developers


Where the post states WhitePages as saying...

"Now that Android has become the leading mobile platform in the US and other key markets around the world, developers are taking notice and some no longer prefer releasing their apps on iOS first, followed by Android. For some, its a question of Androids installed user base, the pace of the platforms growth and the fact that ad-supported free model on Android matches the App Stores 99-cent economy. For others like WhitePages, the decision comes down to cutting out a middleman in order not to be forced to spend time, resources and money on a lengthy approval process.

According to Ina Fried over at the Wall Street Journals All Things D blog, WhitePages new Localicious app will be released on Android first. Apples approval process is just too difficult to time a launch around, Fried writes, noting the iPhone makers stringent approval process had delayed the launch of a reverse phone lookup app from WhitePages for two months, a far cry from the Apple-advertised 95 percent of the apps are approved in two-weeks time. WhitePages op-chief Kevin Nakao tells the blog:

I think we are going to see a lot of people start to ship Android first. You cant be held hostage. Marketing an application becomes increasingly important given the number of apps that are being published. Since apps can still get tied up in the iOS approval process, it makes this marketing planning almost impossible."

So we have the 'He Said, She Said'... Well, I still love you iOS!
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post #9 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

So we have the 'He Said, She Said'... Well, I still love you iOS!

Actually if you look at it the two are completely compatible. One report says 3/4 of developers use iOS primarily or only. Another report says 'some' developers prefer Android.

Conclusion: Some is around 25%
post #10 of 59
Apple could accelerate this by making their iOS developer program free. I've never fully understood the $99 charge to get your app into the App Store. I understand it probably helps them offset the costs of hosting and distributing your software, but if they really wanted to knock Google developer support down a notch or two more, that would be a good way to go.
post #11 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

Where the post states WhitePages as saying...

"Now that Android has become the leading mobile platform in the US and other key markets around the world, developers are taking notice and some no longer prefer releasing their apps on iOS first, followed by Android. For some, its a question of Androids installed user base, the pace of the platforms growth and the fact that ad-supported free model on Android matches the App Stores 99-cent economy. For others like WhitePages, the decision comes down to cutting out a middleman in order not to be forced to spend time, resources and money on a lengthy approval process.

According to Ina Fried over at the Wall Street Journals All Things D blog, WhitePages new Localicious app will be released on Android first. Apples approval process is just too difficult to time a launch around, Fried writes, noting the iPhone makers stringent approval process had delayed the launch of a reverse phone lookup app from WhitePages for two months, a far cry from the Apple-advertised 95 percent of the apps are approved in two-weeks time. WhitePages op-chief Kevin Nakao tells the blog:

I think we are going to see a lot of people start to ship Android first. You cant be held hostage. Marketing an application becomes increasingly important given the number of apps that are being published. Since apps can still get tied up in the iOS approval process, it makes this marketing planning almost impossible."

So we have the 'He Said, She Said'... Well, I still love you iOS!
/
/
/

Funny how Android fans only seem to be able to point to Smartphones as the platform thrust. Android (OS) is NOT the leading mobile platform. iOS is when you factor in iPod Touch and iPad sales not to mention Apple TV ;-)

I don't care if a company ships on Android first. iOS is where the masses that actually pay for software reside.
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post #12 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post

Apple could accelerate this by making their iOS developer program free. I've never fully understood the $99 charge to get your app into the App Store. I understand it probably helps them offset the costs of hosting and distributing your software, but if they really wanted to knock Google developer support down a notch or two more, that would be a good way to go.

If you can't afford $99 then you probably shouldn't be developing apps for my $700. If "I' have more money at my disposal than a developer then that's a shame.
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post #13 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post


Where the post states WhitePages as saying...

"Now that Android has become the leading mobile platform in the US and other key markets around the world, developers are taking notice and some no longer prefer releasing their apps on iOS first, followed by Android. For some, its a question of Androids installed user base, the pace of the platforms growth and the fact that ad-supported free model on Android matches the App Stores 99-cent economy. For others like WhitePages, the decision comes down to cutting out a middleman in order not to be forced to spend time, resources and money on a lengthy approval process.

According to Ina Fried over at the Wall Street Journals All Things D blog, WhitePages new Localicious app will be released on Android first. Apples approval process is just too difficult to time a launch around, Fried writes, noting the iPhone makers stringent approval process had delayed the launch of a reverse phone lookup app from WhitePages for two months, a far cry from the Apple-advertised 95 percent of the apps are approved in two-weeks time. WhitePages op-chief Kevin Nakao tells the blog:

I think we are going to see a lot of people start to ship Android first. You cant be held hostage. Marketing an application becomes increasingly important given the number of apps that are being published. Since apps can still get tied up in the iOS approval process, it makes this marketing planning almost impossible."

So we have the 'He Said, She Said'... Well, I still love you iOS!

It may take longer to get your app approved on iOS.... but apparently it works. 500,000 apps made it in the store already.

And if they are so worried about not being able to have a firm launch date for a new app... why not get it approved... and just say "available now" when it's ready?

Apparently the WhitePages "Localicious" will be free app... from a large company who will be getting money through advertising. So yeah... put it out on any platform and it will make money.

But... if you're a small developer who's trying to make money from SELLING an app... iOS is still the way to go.
post #14 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Actually if you look at it the two are completely compatible. One report says 3/4 of developers use iOS primarily or only. Another report says 'some' developers prefer Android.

Conclusion: Some is around 25%

And, according to this article, that number is falling rather than rising.

My guess is that it has nothing to do with iPad 2 and Verizon iPhone, but is rather due to the fact that developers have learned that they don't make any money on Android and it's a pain in the rear to develop for because of fragmentation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post

Apple could accelerate this by making their iOS developer program free. I've never fully understood the $99 charge to get your app into the App Store. I understand it probably helps them offset the costs of hosting and distributing your software, but if they really wanted to knock Google developer support down a notch or two more, that would be a good way to go.

That's absurd. $99 gets you all the development tools you need and support. It's an insignificant charge to anyone who treats software development like a business - and is a very reasonable charge even for hobbyists.
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post #15 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post

Apple could accelerate this by making their iOS developer program free. I've never fully understood the $99 charge to get your app into the App Store. I understand it probably helps them offset the costs of hosting and distributing your software, but if they really wanted to knock Google developer support down a notch or two more, that would be a good way to go.

I think the $99 charge is mainly to prevent people spamming the approval department by continually signing up new accounts. I'm sure it helps offset the cost of some of developer support too. I think the only thing eliminating this fee will do is increase the number of fart apps.
post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

I'm not here to dispute the article and the findings of Flurry or whatever.

I just found it funny that this morning I read on 9to5google.com a post with the following headline...

WhitePages prioritizes Android over Apples long approval process (UPDATE: Google Ventures, too)

versus AI's headline...

iPad 2, Verizon iPhone took wind out of Android's sail with developers


Where the post states WhitePages as saying...

"Now that Android has become the leading mobile platform in the US and other key markets around the world, developers are taking notice and some no longer prefer releasing their apps on iOS first, followed by Android. For some, its a question of Androids installed user base, the pace of the platforms growth and the fact that ad-supported free model on Android matches the App Stores 99-cent economy. For others like WhitePages, the decision comes down to cutting out a middleman in order not to be forced to spend time, resources and money on a lengthy approval process.

According to Ina Fried over at the Wall Street Journals All Things D blog, WhitePages new Localicious app will be released on Android first. Apples approval process is just too difficult to time a launch around, Fried writes, noting the iPhone makers stringent approval process had delayed the launch of a reverse phone lookup app from WhitePages for two months, a far cry from the Apple-advertised 95 percent of the apps are approved in two-weeks time. WhitePages op-chief Kevin Nakao tells the blog:

I think we are going to see a lot of people start to ship Android first. You cant be held hostage. Marketing an application becomes increasingly important given the number of apps that are being published. Since apps can still get tied up in the iOS approval process, it makes this marketing planning almost impossible."

So we have the 'He Said, She Said'... Well, I still love you iOS!
/
/
/

And, as per my earlier post, we see that the app in question is yet another location aware/what's hot/social thing, which seems dominate whatever activity is happening in the Android app market.

Just fine for a phone, completely pointless on a tablet. At some point the Android community is going to realize that they're simply stuck in a phone ghetto, with everything revolving around chasing after whatever the latest startup is telling you you need to be "connected." Just look at the marketing-- it's all about social apps and media.

Meanwhile, tablets look poised to become the next computing paradigm, and the iPad is looking to dominate that space as completely as MS dominated the desktop paradigm. And, at some point, that's going to have an effect on phones as well, as iPad owners are far more likely to purchase an iPhone (if they haven't already) when it comes time to re-up.
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post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

I'm not here to dispute the article and the findings of Flurry or whatever.

I just found it funny that this morning I read on 9to5google.com a post with the following headline...

WhitePages prioritizes Android over Apples long approval process (UPDATE: Google Ventures, too)

versus AI's headline...

iPad 2, Verizon iPhone took wind out of Android's sail with developers


Where the post states WhitePages as saying...

"Now that Android has become the leading mobile platform in the US and other key markets around the world, developers are taking notice and some no longer prefer releasing their apps on iOS first, followed by Android. For some, its a question of Androids installed user base, the pace of the platforms growth and the fact that ad-supported free model on Android matches the App Stores 99-cent economy. For others like WhitePages, the decision comes down to cutting out a middleman in order not to be forced to spend time, resources and money on a lengthy approval process.

According to Ina Fried over at the Wall Street Journals All Things D blog, WhitePages new Localicious app will be released on Android first. Apples approval process is just too difficult to time a launch around, Fried writes, noting the iPhone makers stringent approval process had delayed the launch of a reverse phone lookup app from WhitePages for two months, a far cry from the Apple-advertised 95 percent of the apps are approved in two-weeks time. WhitePages op-chief Kevin Nakao tells the blog:

I think we are going to see a lot of people start to ship Android first. You cant be held hostage. Marketing an application becomes increasingly important given the number of apps that are being published. Since apps can still get tied up in the iOS approval process, it makes this marketing planning almost impossible."

So we have the 'He Said, She Said'... Well, I still love you iOS!
/
/
/

WhitePages makes no sense. You can release ad-supported free apps on the iPhone; I have plenty installed.

Reading between the lines, perhaps there is more to this, like there was with the publisher community crying foul about the 30% cut (it was about opt-in vs. opt-out of collecting user info). Perhaps this app doesn't meet Apple's requirements, so they're going to the "we all anything" Android Marketplace.
post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

If you can't afford $99 then you probably shouldn't be developing apps for my $700. If "I' have more money at my disposal than a developer then that's a shame.

Wasn't arguing that. Regardless, history shows that plenty of great ideas come from hobbyist programmers and tinkerers. That $99 could be a significant barrier for that group.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

That's absurd. $99 gets you all the development tools you need and support. It's an insignificant charge to anyone who treats software development like a business - and is a very reasonable charge even for hobbyists.

Not what I was saying. I agree with all that. Apple's competitors are giving that away for free and that's the point I'm getting at. If Apple wants to further take the wind out of the sails of Android development, they can remove the $99 fee.

Quote:
Originally Posted by esummers View Post

I think the $99 charge is mainly to prevent people spamming the approval department by continually signing up new accounts. I'm sure it helps offset the cost of some of developer support too. I think the only thing eliminating this fee will do is increase the number of fart apps.

Not arguing the rationale behind the fee, just that it likely turns away a lot of hobbyists. Also, plenty of great ideas and apps have been created by hobbyists. They're not all out there making fart apps.
post #19 of 59
Does this mean all of us who declared Apple really needed the Verizon iPhone get to say "I told you so!"?

"During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." -George Orwell

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post #20 of 59
I keep seeing this 500,000 activation/day figure on ADroid. Has anyone seen verification of this #? It seems absurdly high.
post #21 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

And, as per my earlier post, we see that the app in question is yet another location aware/what's hot/social thing, which seems dominate whatever activity is happening in the Android app market.

Just fine for a phone, completely pointless on a tablet. At some point the Android community is going to realize that they're simply stuck in a phone ghetto, with everything revolving around chasing after whatever the latest startup is telling you you need to be "connected." Just look at the marketing-- it's all about social apps and media.

Meanwhile, tablets look poised to become the next computing paradigm, and the iPad is looking to dominate that space as completely as MS dominated the desktop paradigm. And, at some point, that's going to have an effect on phones as well, as iPad owners are far more likely to purchase an iPhone (if they haven't already) when it comes time to re-up.

Well said!

I also believe. based on my own purchasing habits, that:

-- iPad apps tend to be more robust than iPhone/iPad apps
-- People will spend more on (and expect more from) iPad apps than iPhone apps
-- People will look for iPad apps that complement or replace corresponding apps on their pre-post-pc computers
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post #22 of 59
[QUOTE=inkswamp;1900567]Wasn't arguing that. Regardless, history shows that plenty of great ideas come from hobbyist programmers and tinkerers. That $99 could be a significant barrier for that group.QUOTE]

You do realize that in order to create an idevice app that you need to own a mac. Therefore, your sunk costs are already at $1,000 (maybe a little less if you bought refurb or used). I highly doubt $99 is that big of a barrier (even for hobbyists).
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post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rot'nApple View Post

the iPhone makers stringent approval process had delayed the launch of a reverse phone lookup app from WhitePages for two months, a far cry from the Apple-advertised 95 percent of the apps are approved in two-weeks time.

Am I the only one who thought that this part of the story made absolutely no sense? The guy from Whitepages would have a right to complain if Apple had claimed that 100% of apps are approved in two-weeks' time.

Obviously, that was not the case.

Also obvious: Whitepages falls within the 5% minority that has to wait more than two weeks. How is Apple in the wrong here?
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post

Apple could accelerate this by making their iOS developer program free. I've never fully understood the $99 charge to get your app into the App Store. I understand it probably helps them offset the costs of hosting and distributing your software, but if they really wanted to knock Google developer support down a notch or two more, that would be a good way to go.

The $100/year plus enrollment greatly curtails malware. If Google wanted to stop the Malware issue in the Android Market, all they have to do is make becoming a developer slightly more difficult.
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffmac7101 View Post

I keep seeing this 500,000 activation/day figure on ADroid. Has anyone seen verification of this #? It seems absurdly high.

Larry Page actually pegged the number at 550,000 today at the investor conference, which sounds nice but I'm still trying to wrap my head around and of course still needs confirmation from other sources.

Other than that:
Chrome install base is 160 Million and growing
Google's Revenue climbed to 9+ Billion, an increase of almost 33%. Net income at 2.51 Billion
Google plus is confirmed to have at least an install base of 10 Million users.
Google +1 button has overtaken the tweet button on websites.
And of course to shut the shareholders up, that the prime focus is profit.
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by guch20 View Post

Am I the only one who thought that this part of the story made absolutely no sense? The guy from Whitepages would have a right to complain if Apple had claimed that 100% of apps are approved in two-weeks' time.

Obviously, that was not the case.

Also obvious: Whitepages falls within the 5% minority that has to wait more than two weeks. How is Apple in the wrong here?

Crashes? Unusable? Watchdog issues?
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by trumptman View Post

Does this mean all of us who declared Apple really needed the Verizon iPhone get to say "I told you so!"?

Yes. Yes it does.

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post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post

Wasn't arguing that. Regardless, history shows that plenty of great ideas come from hobbyist programmers and tinkerers. That $99 could be a significant barrier for that group.



Not what I was saying. I agree with all that. Apple's competitors are giving that away for free and that's the point I'm getting at. If Apple wants to further take the wind out of the sails of Android development, they can remove the $99 fee.



Not arguing the rationale behind the fee, just that it likely turns away a lot of hobbyists. Also, plenty of great ideas and apps have been created by hobbyists. They're not all out there making fart apps.

The cheap hobby based programmer can jailbreak for free and the dev tools are a free download.
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

It doesn't help Google that they are absolutely nowhere to be seen on the Lodsys issue. Apple is issuing C&Ds to Lodsys and bringing lawyers to bear. Given the speed with which the wheels of justice turn it may not be able to stop Lodsys forcing some developers to cough up, but nevertheless it induces a feeling that Apple cares about protecting developers from trolls.

Once again Google's cavalier attitude towards IP is biting their ass.

Perhaps it's in part because Lodsys hasn't filed any patent infringement lawsuits against any Android app and it's developer? I can't find one.

FWIW, the respected Florian Mueller (FOSS Patents) suggests that small developers bite the bullet and simply agree to a license. Apple has yet to throw any money in the ring to support their developers and may be listening too much to lawyer wannabe's on blog sites. Mr. Mueller writes that "It's additionally possible that some of them are such "fanbois" that they don't want to call out Apple (and Google) on their failure to really provide app developers with the guarantees that would be needed. Instead, Apple limits its damages to $50 per app developer."

The entire article at FOSS Patents is here:
http://fosspatents.blogspot.com/2011...rolls-are.html
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post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post

Apple could accelerate this by making their iOS developer program free. I've never fully understood the $99 charge to get your app into the App Store. I understand it probably helps them offset the costs of hosting and distributing your software, but if they really wanted to knock Google developer support down a notch or two more, that would be a good way to go.

The $99 fee isn't a store listing fee per application. It's a flat annual fee for signing apps to run on an iOS device. You can write all the apps you want and you don't even have to list them on the App Store. You can just write apps for your own personal use.

If Apple reduced or waived the fee, I don't think the overall quality of apps would improve. We'd probably see even more fart apps, flashlight apps, and joke apps.

The fee also discourages iOS developers from writing malware, a growing problem with Android apps. After all, there's a credit card tied to the account. Makes it far easier for the Feds to find naughty programmers.
post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by inkswamp View Post

Not arguing the rationale behind the fee, just that it likely turns away a lot of hobbyists. Also, plenty of great ideas and apps have been created by hobbyists. They're not all out there making fart apps.

There are 400,000+ Apps that have delivered 15billion+ copies. It's clearly working fine.
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xero910 View Post

^ Well said.


No. One a year is plenty. They sell every one they can build, they don't need to introduce a new model mid-year. Not to mention it would steal the spotlight from their other products.

Too late! They're already doing this.

If reports are to be believed we're going to be seeing a 2nd iPad model this year. Apple can no longer afford to be on a yearly update cycle. It is not the same situation, at all, as even 5 or 6 years ago when Apple would do 1 year refreshes on iPods.
post #33 of 59
Some people think that Apple should lower the $99 developer fee? I say hell no, I am not interested in all sorts of riff raff and street bums developing apps for my iPad. I mean seriously, if somebody can not afford $99 as a developer, then they have zero business making any apps at all. These bums should stick to making Android apps, as that is where the lower class clientele is located, and they would be much more comfortable on that platform.

I have no time for amateur hour, when I'm buying apps for my iPad.
post #34 of 59
Of course Android should be first choice when developing an app that harvests users personal data for monetization. Apple isn't going to go for that. That's why they rejected White Pages caller-ID app since it wanted access to call history logs and contacts' info. If WP can't harvest user info, then how is it going to make money, or recover costs, if the app is free? I mean the user has to give them something that WP can aggregate and sell off.

Sure, apps that are basically trojan horses, intended solely to trick/entice users to share info for the purpose of resale and monetization will definitely face harsh treatment in approval. Since Google's business model is along the same lines, it doesn't object.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Perhaps it's in part because Lodsys hasn't filed any patent infringement lawsuits against any Android app and it's developer? I can't find one.

No - they have. http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/27/...gement-claims/

Quote:
FWIW, the respected Florian Mueller (FOSS Patents) suggests that small developers bite the bullet and simply agree to a license. Apple has yet to throw any money in the ring to support their developers and may be listening too much to lawyer wannabe's on blog sites. Mr. Mueller writes that "It's additionally possible that some of them are such "fanbois" that they don't want to call out Apple (and Google) on their failure to really provide app developers with the guarantees that would be needed. Instead, Apple limits its damages to $50 per app developer."

Yes because Apple's approach with Lodsys will take longer than most developers can wait. Still you can't avoid the fact that unlike Google, Apple is actually doing something.
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turley Muller View Post

Of course Android should be first choice when developing an app that harvests users personal data for monetization. Apple isn't going to go for that. That's why they rejected White Pages caller-ID app since it wanted access to call history logs and contacts' info. If WP can't harvest user info, then how is it going to make money, or recover costs, if the app is free? I mean the user has to give them something that WP can aggregate and sell off.

Sure, apps that are basically trojan horses, intended solely to trick/entice users to share info for the purpose of resale and monetization will definitely face harsh treatment in approval. Since Google's business model is along the same lines, it doesn't object.

Whether or not it's officially sanctioned, there's well-known and top-rated AppStore apps that have fact transmitted private information, even unique identifiable data, without your permission according to a Wall Street Journal investigation.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...703574602.html
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post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

No - they have. http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/27/...gement-claims/

Yes because Apple's approach with Lodsys will take longer than most developers can wait. Still you can't avoid the fact that unlike Google, Apple is actually doing something.

In-App billing on Android is optional...Google has no obligation, although it would be nice if they did step in.

If you put your hand on a stove knowing it was hot..you will get burned.
post #38 of 59
[QUOTE=cloudgazer;1900617]No - they have. http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/27/...gement-claims/

That's only a claim that one Android developer received a letter from Lodsys if I read it correctly. I can't find any verification of that claim, much less that a lawsuit has actually been filed. Perhaps you have some link that shows the Android app that's been targeted?
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post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

And, as per my earlier post, we see that the app in question is yet another location aware/what's hot/social thing, which seems dominate whatever activity is happening in the Android app market.

Just fine for a phone, completely pointless on a tablet. At some point the Android community is going to realize that they're simply stuck in a phone ghetto, with everything revolving around chasing after whatever the latest startup is telling you you need to be "connected." Just look at the marketing-- it's all about social apps and media.

Meanwhile, tablets look poised to become the next computing paradigm, and the iPad is looking to dominate that space as completely as MS dominated the desktop paradigm. And, at some point, that's going to have an effect on phones as well, as iPad owners are far more likely to purchase an iPhone (if they haven't already) when it comes time to re-up.


Yours is the best comment yet. Apple has slowly and strategically built its position in the marketplace and now we are beginning to see just how integrated and synergistic their multi-tiered approach is.

The last butt hurt left from MS domination now fades into distant memory as the post-pc juggernaut now can not be stopped.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The loss in developer support for new projects, at least according to Flurry, comes as activation of new Android devices continues to surge. In June, Google Vice President of Engineering Andy Rubin revealed that there are now more than a half-million Android devices activated every day, and that number is growing at 4.4 percent worldwide.

When discussing growth rates, the time period is critical. Otherwise the entire article could be wrong.

According to a NetworkWorld article on 28 June, Andy Rubin claimed Android had 500K activations per day and grew 4.4% on a week-over-week basis.

http://www.networkworld.com/news/201...roid-500k.html

And Larry Page claims today in their earnings report that they are activating 550K devices per day.

http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-...14-716320.html

Taken together, that means Android growth actually slowed between 28 June and 14 July, a period of about 3 weeks. Because x^3 * 500 = 550, therefore x = 1.032, or 3.2% growth week-on-week.
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