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Motorola beats expectations but guidance disappoints as Xoom fails to match iPad

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
Motorola Mobility posted better revenues than expected, but lost $56 million in the quarter and provided disappointing guidance that sent its shares down 6 percent.

The company announced $3.3 billion in revenues for the quarter, higher than the $3.12 billion analysts had collectively predicted. But Motorola lost $56 million in the quarter, compared to a profit of $80 million in the year ago quarter.

Last year, Motorola's position in smartphones was rebounding while riding the wave of the "year of Android," benefitting from a tight relationship with Verizon Wireless, which had heavily promoted the firm's Android phone offerings under its Droid brand.

Motorola was also gearing up to launch its Xoom tablet running Android 3.0 Honeycomb, which was widely expected by Android enthusiasts to mount a significant challenge to Apple's iPad.

Instead, the launch of iPhone 4 on Verizon's network this spring blunted the prospects for a variety of new Motorola handsets that had banked on Verizon's 4G LTE network to carry sales, including the Motorola Atrix 4G, touted by the firm as "the world's most powerful smartphone." In the most recent quarter, Apple's smartphone continued to outsell all 4G handsets on Verizon's network by nearly a factor of two.

Additionally, Apple's iPad 2 launch left the Motorola Xoom stalled on its launch pad. The Honeycomb tablet had originally taunted the iPad as being suited to lemmings, while touting itself as having support for Adobe Flash as well as features of Google's latest Android 3.0 release, sold as being designed "from the ground up" for tablets.

Sales of the Xoom were depressed by its price, set higher than the iPad, as well as missing features such as its originally non-functional Flash support and a variety of other unfinished features in the brand new Android 3.0.

Motorola stated that it shipped 440,000 tablets in the most recent quarter, ahead of analyst expectations of just 366,000 but far lower than the 9.41 million iPads Apple sold in its most recent quarter.

A report by Reuters noted that Motorola provided a third-quarter "bottom line target ranging from break even to 10 cents per share, excluding unusual items."



The report cited Charter Equity Research analyst Ed Snyder as saying, "This looked a lot weaker than Wall Street had been expecting," contrasting expectations for 24 cents per share. "It's all lining up to be a weak quarter that's going to ripple though to the end of the year," Synder said.

Motorola's Xoom was to be the flagship tablet showing off Google's Android 3.0 Honeycomb, but instead appears to have delivered a blow to Google's reputation in consumer software about equal to the disastrous launch of Google TV, which is being blamed with tripping up Logitech by helping it lose $29.6 million it the latest quarter as more of its Google TV boxes were returned than sold, promoting the resignation of its chief executive Gerald Quindlen.

Original estimates for the Xoom hoped for sales of 3 to 5 million units in 2011, but so far the company has sold closer to a half million of the devices, depressing the prospects for other Honeycomb tablets and tablets in general outside of the iPad, and further reinforcing the reality that the iPad, like the iPod before it, exists as its own market with exclusive demand, rather than being part of a larger, generic "tablet" market.
post #2 of 41
Given that Moto 'Expanded distribution of the ATRIX 4G smartphone and Motorola XOOM
tablets into Latin America, China, Korea, and Europe'
we have to assume that a big chunk of that 440k units are channel inventory.
post #3 of 41
DED is back!

same old question: 440,000 Xoom shipped in last quarter, but how many really sold? did they say? or sold to date going back two quarters?

when they don't give you actual sales stats, you know they have to be crummy. when they are good, they boast about it.
post #4 of 41
This comes to no surprise. Motorola pulled the Xoom out of the oven half-baked, and essentially over-promised the functionality. They should be ashamed of themselves for bring a product out into the market before it was ready.

If Apple pulled a Motorola, the trolls and iHaters would be out in full force to crucify Apple, yet barely a peep was out for Motorola's mishap.

I'm a little surprised they shipped as much as they did, but a recent article has mentioned that Android's shipments are being eclipsed by their high return rates.

http://techcrunch.com/2011/07/26/and...rns-are-30-40/

Android fans I believe to be more of the "sheep" mentality than criticizing Apple fans. There have been so many disappointments on the Android side:

Fragmentation
Un-upgradeable phones, or long-delays of upgraded OS,
Inferior build quality
Inferior performance
Malware
Inconsistent experiences,
<insert many more Android faults>

The Android community complains about all these problems too, yet they keep preaching "Just wait till <insert next 'iOS-killing Android Food Group here>" or "Just wait till the next Motorola/Samsung/HTC/Xerox/Chinese Knockoff POS Bionic/WhipCream/ThunderPOS phone to put Apple in its place" and flat-out refuse to take a step back and see the mess that they are supporting.

And then I'm here actually getting to "use" my iOS device.
post #5 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I'm a little surprised they shipped as much as they did, but a recent article has mentioned that Android's shipments are being eclipsed by their high return rates.

They increased distribution to non US markets, so naturally they needed to ship a lot more. I wouldn't put too much stock by that article though, it's completely unsourced anecdotal evidence.
post #6 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

This comes to no surprise. Motorola pulled the Xoom out of the oven half-baked, and essentially over-promised the functionality. They should be ashamed of themselves for bring a product out into the market before it was ready.

If Apple pulled a Motorola, the trolls and iHaters would be out in full force to crucify Apple, yet barely a peep was out for Motorola's mishap.

I'm a little surprised they shipped as much as they did, but a recent article has mentioned that Android's shipments are being eclipsed by their high return rates.

http://techcrunch.com/2011/07/26/and...rns-are-30-40/

Android fans I believe to be more of the "sheep" mentality than criticizing Apple fans. There have been so many disappointments on the Android side:

Fragmentation
Un-upgradeable phones, or long-delays of upgraded OS,
Inferior build quality
Inferior performance
Malware
Inconsistent experiences,
<insert many more Android faults>

The Android community complains about all these problems too, yet they keep preaching "Just wait till <insert next 'iOS-killing Android Food Group here>" or "Just wait till the next Motorola/Samsung/HTC/Xerox/Chinese Knockoff POS Bionic/WhipCream/ThunderPOS phone to put Apple in its place" and flat-out refuse to take a step back and see the mess that they are supporting.

And then I'm here actually getting to "use" my iOS device.

But... but... Android is open! It HAS to be better!
post #7 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I'm a little surprised they shipped as much as they did, but a recent article has mentioned that Android's shipments are being eclipsed by their high return rates.

http://techcrunch.com/2011/07/26/and...rns-are-30-40/

That article was already panned by BoyGeniusReports, who called it "Absolutely Ridiculous". Their sources have put the return rate in the low single digits.

http://www.bgr.com/2011/07/28/40-of-...ly-ridiculous/
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post #8 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

DED is back!

same old question: 440,000 Xoom shipped in last quarter, but how many really sold? did they say? or sold to date going back two quarters?

when they don't give you actual sales stats, you know they have to be crummy. when they are good, they boast about it.

Motorola might not have actual sell-through numbers, especially in instances where carriers sell to 3rd-party retail partners. They would have a very reasonable estimate at the least.

MMI said it expects sales to be less that 440K for this quarter. If that tells you anything. If units don't move through the channel, can't sell more until its worked down. Also, MMI lowered it's full year forecast for tablets. Obviously it's not selling well to consumers.
post #9 of 41
The Zebra-Hinny can't keep up with Secretariat.
post #10 of 41
Quote:
``Motorola stated that it shipped 440,000 tablets in the most recent quarter, ahead of analyst expectations of just 366,000 but far lower than the 9.41 million iPads Apple sold in its most recent quarter. ''

Seriously, do we even need to discuss the fantasy that Apple isn't crushing every competitor in the Tablet space?
post #11 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

That article was already panned by BoyGeniusReports, who called it "Absolutely Ridiculous". Their sources have put the return rate in the low single digits.

http://www.bgr.com/2011/07/28/40-of-...ly-ridiculous/

30-40% isn't unreasonable for one particular store concerning a specific device. I heard HTC Thunderbolts had high return rates, and ATRIX too. However, I am convinced it's do to sales pressure. Sales staff pushing the device on them, promising if they don't like it, to return it in 5 days swap for what u were really looking for. Hero phones usually have volume commitments and stores have to meet those, and there can be larger rips, or commissions on those devices. So, I think its extremely isolated, and pertains to instances where devices are being recommended for a customer that would have little chance not to like it.
post #12 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by J.R. View Post

But... but... Android is open! It HAS to be better!

Open like a sieve?
post #13 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turley Muller View Post

30-40% isn't unreasonable for one particular store concerning a specific device. I heard HTC Thunderbolts had high return rates, and ATRIX too. However, I am convinced it's do to sales pressure. Sales staff pushing the device on them, promising if they don't like it, to return it in 5 days swap for what u were really looking for. Hero phones usually have volume commitments and stores have to meet those, and there can be larger rips, or commissions on those devices. So, I think its extremely isolated, and pertains to instances where devices are being recommended for a customer that would have little chance not to like it.

Based on what I see going on at stores like Best Buy, the salespeople there tend to be Android fans and really push those phones. A common line I hear, "It's just like iPhone / iPad, just cheaper/better".

I'd bet money that they consumer takes it home after falling for that line, hate the Android experience and return it. But hey, Android is counted as an "Activation".
post #14 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdsonice View Post

Open like a sieve?

Open like a hula hoop. Sieves catch some things.
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post #15 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turley Muller View Post

30-40% isn't unreasonable for one particular store concerning a specific device. . .

IMO it would still be completely unreasonable and highly unlikely.
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post #16 of 41
You know, the obvious disparity between Apple's sales of iPad's et.al. and whatever meaningful sales of Brand X's tablets really highlights the depth and breadth of Apple's engineering prowess.

Job's said it so much himself when introducing the original iPad.

He said something to the effect that going into the project of making the iPad, it had to be a KILLER product or the market would flatly reject it.

Well, the market has embraced it in a way that all of Brand X could have never imagined.

-insert Ballmer's misguided chuckling

-insert Moto's mounting quarterly loses

-insert the pennies on the dollar that Android developers have made on Android tablets vs. iOS-

Are the Brand X's really that out of touch?

I'd HATE to be competing against Apple these days.

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post #17 of 41
Motorola was also gearing up to launch its Xoom tablet running Android 3.0 Honeycomb, which was widely expected by Android enthusiasts to mount a significant challenge to Apple's iPad.


And what do they expect when that tablet seems to resemble something purchased at a toy store?
post #18 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlink View Post


I'd HATE to be competing against Apple these days.

I hear the JooJoo is coming back... didn't they learn the first time?

http://thisismynext.com/2011/07/28/f...c-crosses-fcc/
post #19 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Seriously, do we even need to discuss the fantasy that Apple isn't crushing every competitor in the Tablet space?

There's still a question of degree, and these results shed a little light on that. There's no doubt that Apple's share of sales is far greater than the 60% share of shipments, but is it 80%? is it 90%? more? We don't know and it's still worth seeing what data we can grub up to shed light on it.

The netmarketshare numbers would indicate Moto has about 50% sell-through, so if that is true across the board we'd be looking at 80% for iPad. But Moto's sell-through could be worse than that if netmarketshare is over-sampling US web-usage.

The interesting thing is that if the Xoom only sold 350k-ish units and only shipped 700k-ish, then is the 1.3% honeycomb number from Google an over-estimate? Maybe android tab owners visit the app market more often than phone owners.

As far as I know the Xoom was until recently the only honeycomb tablet in existence. In which case going forward we need to assume that numbers based on estimates from android market statistics are off by a factor of between two and four.
post #20 of 41
If we are going to ignore 'Sales', and instead substitute 'shipments' for products on tne market, maybe we should subtract 'returns' or 'remainded' or 'bargain basketed' from the shipped figure, to get a more accurate figure of kit that doesn't sell.

Anyone can produce junk and ship it. But if hardly anyone buys it, and ypy end up selling it at a loss, whay is the point?
post #21 of 41
iPod achieved its success not just by being shiner and having a better interface. iTunes propelled iPod to the top. In 10 years iTunes went from "Rip. Mix. Burn." to being the #1 music retailer in the US (back in spring of 2008) to now having reached 15 billion app downloads (July 7, 2011.)

iPod also got a huge helping hand from Sony. Sony essentially handed the worldwide portable music player market over to Apple. Sony tried too many proprietary storage media (MiniDisc, Memory Stick, UMD) and tried locking users in with ATRAC copy protection. They threw away all that Walkman mindshare and market share. Apple gladly took it and never looked back.

So here we are, less than 1.5 years after iPad was first released. iTunes is still there. It's the 800 pound gorilla in the room that all other consumer electronics makers are trying to ignore. It powers iPad and all other Apple mobile and desktop computing devices. There are hundreds of millions of iTunes accounts with credit cards. And Apple is leveraging iTunes again as it pioneers the next era of computing, the post-PC era. Just the way they leveraged iTunes in the post-Walkman era of portable entertainment.

Oh, and iPad is getting a helping hand from Microsoft. Microsoft and their hardware partners managed to sell a few million Windows tablets / slates / UMPCs / WInCE / Pocket PCs / whatever. In 10 years of trying. They just don't get it. Hammering the square Windows peg into the round pad hole didn't set the consumer electronics world on fire, and it never will. They showed Apple how not to do it and got left behind in the dust.

The post-PC era is looking more and more like the post-Walkman era turned out. An all-Apple show.

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post #22 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gromit View Post

If we are going to ignore 'Sales', and instead substitute 'shipments' for products on tne market, maybe we should subtract 'returns' or 'remainded' or 'bargain basketed' from the shipped figure, to get a more accurate figure of kit that doesn't sell.

Anyone can produce junk and ship it. But if hardly anyone buys it, and ypy end up selling it at a loss, whay is the point?

Hundreds of thousands of Android devices gathering dust in a warehouse?
Can't sell them even at a loss?

One word: Arson.

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post #23 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gromit View Post

Anyone can produce junk and ship it. But if hardly anyone buys it, and ypy end up selling it at a loss, whay is the point?

Yes but about 50% of the handsets made globally are by loss making firms, so we kinda have to count them
post #24 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

That article was already panned by BoyGeniusReports, who called it "Absolutely Ridiculous". Their sources have put the return rate in the low single digits.

http://www.bgr.com/2011/07/28/40-of-...ly-ridiculous/

Yeah, but this is meaningless also.

One unsourced anecdotal evidence says one thing, one says the opposite. Remember too that BGR has a history of fabricating and embellishing stories themselves, so it's not like they are an authoritative source. For what it's worth I don't see evidence that the return is that high, but in truth we have no information one way or the other that's really reliable.
post #25 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

There's still a question of degree, and these results shed a little light on that. There's no doubt that Apple's share of sales is far greater than the 60% share of shipments, but is it 80%? is it 90%? more? We don't know and it's still worth seeing what data we can grub up to shed light on it.

The netmarketshare numbers would indicate Moto has about 50% sell-through, so if that is true across the board we'd be looking at 80% for iPad. But Moto's sell-through could be worse than that if netmarketshare is over-sampling US web-usage.

The interesting thing is that if the Xoom only sold 350k-ish units and only shipped 700k-ish, then is the 1.3% honeycomb number from Google an over-estimate? Maybe android tab owners visit the app market more often than phone owners.

As far as I know the Xoom was until recently the only honeycomb tablet in existence. In which case going forward we need to assume that numbers based on estimates from android market statistics are off by a factor of between two and four.

In relation to the Xoom if we assume that 440k shipped equates to sales the market share Apple has relative to the Xoom over the most recent quarter is a paltry 95.5%.

To lower Apple down to just 80% of the market would require the remaining Android based iPads to sell a combined: 1,911,500 tablets.

Not happening.
post #26 of 41
So how long can Motorola keep this up? The initial Android surge took them from money losing to (barely) profitable for a few quarters, but now they've returned to operating in the red.

I haven't seen anything about what their assets look like, but you have to assume that this kind of performance isn't exactly stocking the R&D war-chest.

So here we have Apple, with boat loads of cash to spend on aggressively refining and improving the iPad and iOS, against the likes of Motorola, who at best can iterate their case design, drop in current parts, and hope that Google makes Android into a more interesting tablet OS. Why would we expect them to do anything particularly competitive, next quarter or any quarter?

Tablets aren't phones. Most of them aren't sold (pushed) by carriers, most of them aren't subsidized, and no one wanders into BestBuy because their service contract on their tablet is up and they're ready to take whatever the sales guy is flogging. Apple is capable of spending the money it takes to really sweat the details, Motorola isn't. And consumers notice. The only way around that obstacle is to sell your stuff for significantly less, but Motorola doesn't really have that luxury either. And what happens if Android licenses keep getting more expensive due to litigation?

I see this as being LG and Sony-Ericsson's situation as well, for what it's worth. The only profitable mainstream players in Android land are Samsung and HTC, and it may not be too long before they're the only ones left standing-- well, them and the Chinese white box outfits that will be bringing the relentless price pressure.
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post #27 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

Based on what I see going on at stores like Best Buy, the salespeople there tend to be Android fans and really push those phones. A common line I hear, "It's just like iPhone / iPad, just cheaper/better".

I'd bet money that they consumer takes it home after falling for that line, hate the Android experience and return it. But hey, Android is counted as an "Activation".

Exactly, let's factor in returns to the activation numbers.
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post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

In relation to the Xoom if we assume that 440k shipped equates to sales the market share Apple has relative to the Xoom over the most recent quarter is a paltry 95.5%.

To lower Apple down to just 80% of the market would require the remaining Android based iPads to sell a combined: 1,911,500 tablets.

Not happening.

Should have made it clear, I was talking about estimates for 2011 in total, since that's what this article was discussing.
post #29 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

IMO it would still be completely unreasonable and highly unlikely.

Look, not that I believe the article's completely unsourced and unattributed numbers but it does seem entirely possible for a bad product to hit 30% returns. Apparently it can go over 100%.

Sales of Logitech Revue were slightly negative during the quarter, as returns of the product were higher than the very modest sales. We believe the significantly lower everyday price for Logitech Revue, reduced from $249 to $99, will generate improved sales.

http://phx.corporate-ir.net/External...F8VHlwZT0z&t=1
post #30 of 41
Dear God, the Logitech Revue was so dreadful people were making them on their own just so they could return them.
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post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Should have made it clear, I was talking about estimates for 2011 in total, since that's what this article was discussing.

Then add the past 3 quarters together. Now go back to Moto's prior 2 10-Qs and compare.

You'll find that this was Moto's best quarter for the Xoom.
post #32 of 41
Quote:
Original estimates for the Xoom hoped for sales of 3 to 5 million units in 2011, but so far the company has sold closer to a half million of the devices, depressing the prospects for other Honeycomb tablets and tablets in general outside of the iPad, and further reinforcing the reality that the iPad, like the iPod before it, exists as its own market with exclusive demand, rather than being part of a larger, generic "tablet" market.

It's been said over and over. It's not a tablet market, it's an iPad market.
post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Then add the past 3 quarters together. Now go back to Moto's prior 2 10-Qs and compare.

You'll find that this was Moto's best quarter for the Xoom.

Huh? It only launched last quarter! The other 10.1 inch tablets only launched this quarter. It's to be expected that no matter how bad their shipments are, more of them will happen in Q3 and Q4 than in Q1 or Q2, just because of the number of devices. That's without even bringing up the insane introductory price.
post #34 of 41
the comparison of the iPad with the iPod's market domination is more complex than just saying it has held 70% of the market for the last 8 years, and so will the iPad.

first, there is probably a whole lot of very cheap no-recognizable-brand PMP's out there in the second/third world whose sales just don't get picked up in these stats. like all those toy like gizmos in China. they work, sort of. and sell tens of millions.

and i think the same thing will eventually happen with tablets too in the next few years. they'll probably run some bastardized version of Android, legal or not. they won't be reflected in market stats either, which are mainly about products made by first world OEM's (including their worldwide sales). but there will be tens of millions of them too.

second, the iPod touch is really a tablet. forget the artificial iPod name, it's Apple's iOS mini-tablet, and accounts for half of iPod sales. that means the basic iPod Nano/Shuffle/Classic sales are just about 55% of the basic measured PMP market. and Apple iOS tablet sales were 12 million last quarter instead of 9.8 million, likely bumping its tablet market share to well above 90%.

that % has to slide downward gradually. while Apple and some OEM's keep pushing tablet tech ahead with state of the art products, a less advanced and less expensive version of basic tablets for the mass commodity market will emerge and sell in large numbers. eventually there will be $99 tablets, just like today's $25 PMP's. within 5 years i'm sure.

so at that point Apple's tablet market share measured by unit sales might be just 50% too. but measured by dollar volume, it will be much higher.

which is also what is happening with the iPhone by the way.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiejr View Post

DED is back!

same old question: 440,000 Xoom shipped in last quarter, but how many really sold? did they say? or sold to date going back two quarters?

when they don't give you actual sales stats, you know they have to be crummy. when they are good, they boast about it.

The best estimates from unbiased sources and based on actual facts is that about 325,000 Xooms have been sold so far.

That means that about 73-75% of the channel actually sold so the next time Motorola comes out with figures, take 75% of that and you have the actual numbers.
post #36 of 41
Well said and to the point. At the end of the day, I believe poor customer experience matters and has impacts. That is my belief. Google has just be horrible at it. Exhibit A being Google TV. Exhibit B being the horrible Samsung 7" inch tablet they pushed onto the market as their first tablet market. Horrible



Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

So how long can Motorola keep this up? The initial Android surge took them from money losing to (barely) profitable for a few quarters, but now they've returned to operating in the red.

I haven't seen anything about what their assets look like, but you have to assume that this kind of performance isn't exactly stocking the R&D war-chest.

So here we have Apple, with boat loads of cash to spend on aggressively refining and improving the iPad and iOS, against the likes of Motorola, who at best can iterate their case design, drop in current parts, and hope that Google makes Android into a more interesting tablet OS. Why would we expect them to do anything particularly competitive, next quarter or any quarter?

Tablets aren't phones. Most of them aren't sold (pushed) by carriers, most of them aren't subsidized, and no one wanders into BestBuy because their service contract on their tablet is up and they're ready to take whatever the sales guy is flogging. Apple is capable of spending the money it takes to really sweat the details, Motorola isn't. And consumers notice. The only way around that obstacle is to sell your stuff for significantly less, but Motorola doesn't really have that luxury either. And what happens if Android licenses keep getting more expensive due to litigation?

I see this as being LG and Sony-Ericsson's situation as well, for what it's worth. The only profitable mainstream players in Android land are Samsung and HTC, and it may not be too long before they're the only ones left standing-- well, them and the Chinese white box outfits that will be bringing the relentless price pressure.

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post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

The best estimates from unbiased sources and based on actual facts is that about 325,000 Xooms have been sold so far.

That means that about 73-75% of the channel actually sold so the next time Motorola comes out with figures, take 75% of that and you have the actual numbers.

That would be about 50% then, if you mean 325k total not just last quarter - they've shipped a total of around 700k in both quarters combined.
post #38 of 41
Back in my retail sales days, they told us to "under-promise and over-deliver". In other words, make sure the product the customer buys exceeds their expectations. It appears that with the Xoom, Playbook, HP Whatchamacallit, they got it backwards: "It runs Flash!!" (poorly), "It's open!!" (to malware/viruses), "It's versatile!!" (though very few apps), etc.

And then the reviews come out...
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post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudgazer View Post

Given that Moto 'Expanded distribution of the ATRIX™ 4G smartphone and Motorola XOOM
tablets into Latin America, China, Korea, and Europe'
we have to assume that a big chunk of that 440k units are channel inventory.

All I need to know is whether it was "smooth" or not. Actual sell thru is irrelevant!

As I said before, it should be plain illegal to not report sell thru. "Shipped". What bollocks.

The shareholders are the ones getting screwed on this. They might not have a clear idea how horrible these "iPad killers" all are.
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Motorola stated that it shipped 440,000 tablets in the most recent quarter, ahead of analyst expectations of just 366,000 but far lower than the 9.41 million iPads Apple sold in its most recent quarter.

so, this is pretty funny, they got outsold by Asus.... who was restricted by amount they could make and didn't use any large scale ad campaign.

rofl, i wonder what it would take for Apple's iPod to drop to under 50% of marketshare-- People from the future stealing Apple's iPad 4 design, and finding a company that could make it without ruining it.... rofl.

ah Motorola....

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