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First look: Adobe Edge promises Flash-style animation with HTML5

post #1 of 79
Thread Starter 
Adobe's new Web development tool, Edge, aims to offer the same dynamic motion as Flash, but in the industry standard HTML5 format compatible with the iPhone and iPad.

Heidi Voltmer and Josh Hatwich of Adobe spoke with AppleInsider and showed off the new Adobe Edge tool, which is now available as a free download. With the first preview of Edge, the company has shifted its development strategy from the past, when software was only available in a closed beta.

Voltmer said Adobe plans on engaging with its development community and asking for feedback as it updates the software over the coming months. Adobe Edge is expected to be released as a commercial 1.0 product at some point in 2012.

"Our customers will actually see the product develop based on their input," Voltmer said of the preview period.

Hatwich provided a demonstration of the software, and noted that it launches quickly and features a user interface that those who have used Adobe's other products, like After Effects and Flash Pro, will be instantly familiar with.

In one live example, Hatwich created an animation built entirely in HTML5 with Adobe Edge. The animation was a faux advertisement for Edge, with text and graphics fading in and out and sliding across the screen.

The new motion and interaction design tool will let customers build Flash-like content using Web standards like CSS and JavaScript. It also supports the animation framework built on JQuery, a popular JavaScript library used widely on the Internet.



"You can really get a really nice experience and a nice effect using just HTML5 and technologies that are native to the browser," Hatwich said.

In another demonstration, he showed how Adobe Edge can be used to add HTML5 elements to an existing website. The application was used to download the entire contents of a website, and Hatwich was then able to target specific elements of the page.



In this example, Hatwich selected a division on the page, known as a "div," and created a quick element of it sliding into place. He then copied that animation and pasted it for another element on the page, quickly replicating the same motion.

After the HTML5 code was created by Adobe Edge, Hatwich opened the page in Apple's Safari browser to show off the animation in action. When looking at the source code of the page, he showed that the entire HTML markup of the page remained intact, and that Edge simply added a few "include" files into the head section of the page. Actual content was stored in a Javascript file and a CSS file.



Hatwich said he believes the functionality available now with Adobe Edge is superior to the "rough handoff" that currently happens on some websites with server-side content management systems.

Adobe has been testing its tool across a variety of browsers and platforms, with particular interest in the iPhone and iPad, which do not run Flash. Because some browsers feature support for only some aspects of the HTML5 specification, he admitted getting sites to work seamlessly is something of a work-in-progress.

"It's an emerging space," Hatwich said.



But as Web development continues to grow and change, Adobe officials indicated they intend to stay aggressive in supporting both Flash and HTML5 with new and enhanced tools for programmers.

To that end, Hatwich revealed that Adobe is developing Edge with a "rapid release cycle" as part of the design. Numerous updates to the pre-release software are planned for the coming months, adding new features and functionality as the team builds toward a 1.0 release.

"We know that we need to get out early and we need to get lots of feedback from customers," Voltmer said, "and we need to really move quickly to adapt to that feedback."
post #2 of 79
Certainly predictable that Adobe would have to relent to Apple, and not a moment too soon given Apple's dominance in the post-PC era, by offering convenient tools to build HTML 5 flash-equivalent renderings. The residual benefit for Adobe might be a quicker migration of HTML 5 to non-Apple post-PC and smartphone products as well. The end result will likely be better Flash-like performance (more efficient and reliable) for everyone - both Apple and non-Apple device owners alike.
post #3 of 79
My only question is why Adobe wasn't out in front of HTML5 tool development from the beginning.

   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

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   Apple develops an improved programming language.  Google copied Java.  Everything you need to know, right there.

 

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post #4 of 79
just great, the first thing created was an ad
post #5 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by kresh View Post

just great, the first thing created was an ad

If you want all your content for free, you're just gonna have to get used to ads. Shit doesn't pay for itself.
post #6 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by kresh View Post

just great, the first thing created was an ad

Just wait for Adobe to release it with an interactive Flash site instead of one made with web code.
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post #7 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1reflectsathome View Post

Certainly predictable that Adobe would have to relent to Apple, and not a moment too soon given Apple's dominance in the post-PC era, by offering convenient tools to build HTML 5 flash-equivalent renderings. The residual benefit for Adobe might be a quicker migration of HTML 5 to non-Apple post-PC and smartphone products as well. The end result will likely be better Flash-like performance (more efficient and reliable) for everyone - both Apple and non-Apple device owners alike.

I don't feel Adobe relented to Apple. For this to be this far advanced, Adobe had to have Edge in the works for quite a while, don't you think? I just wonder why they never mentioned it back when it would have been a great answer to Apple's decision not to support Flash on iDevices.

This is a question 'cuz I don't know....was Adobe working on this before Apple clotheslined them? Can a software company come this far, this fast with a product like this?

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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post #8 of 79
I hope it's not developed by the folks who did the Flash IDE. That's an awful piece of software.

In general I'm not expecting anything but sloppy crap from Adobe's UI designers.
post #9 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

I don't feel Adobe relented to Apple. For this to be this far advanced, Adobe had to have Edge in the works for quite a while, don't you think?

Nah, I reckon they had the time.
post #10 of 79
Certainly predictable that Adobe would have to relent to Apple, and not a moment too soon given Apple's dominance in the post-PC era, by offering convenient tools to build HTML 5 flash-equivalent renderings. The residual benefit for Adobe might be a quicker migration of HTML 5 to non-Apple post-PC and smartphone products as well. The end result will likely be better Flash-like performance (more efficient and reliable) for everyone - both Apple and non-Apple device owners alike.

[QUOTE=Dickprinter;1912341]I don't feel Adobe relented to Apple. For this to be this far advanced, Adobe had to have Edge in the works for quite a while, don't you think? I just wonder why they never mentioned it back when it would have been a great answer to Apple's decision not to support Flash on iDevices.

This is a question 'cuz I don't know....was Adobe working on this before Apple clotheslined them? Can a software company come this far, this fast with a product like this?[/QUOTE

Actually, Adobe has had plenty of time to develop tools to support migration of Flash to HTML 5. The first iPhone was released in June 2007 with no flash support. Adobe was furious that Steve Jobs said it was because Flash was built for mouse control and not touch, was too buggy, drained battery life and crashed often. The feud lasted for several years but I think Adobe then saw the runaway appeal the iPhone had, and now iPad, despite not offering Flash support. So Adobe must have concluded some time ago that they needed Apple more than Apple needed them.*
I think Adobe has been working for many months now and perhaps a couple of years in developing migration tools, and now accelerating it's efforts to be in the game with Apple. Also read this brief article showing that Adobe wants very much to reconnect with Apple for Post-PC Flash-like services.*http://mashable.com/2011/03/01/adobe-ads-apple/
post #11 of 79
Adobe will probably make it part of Creative Suite 6

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Mac IIcx, Mac Quadra 800, Mac Performa 5200, Power Mac 8600, LaserWriter, iPhone 3G, iPad 3G, iPhone 4S | MacBook Pro, 27" iMac, iPad 3 LTE

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post #12 of 79
Great! I'm glad this has happened. I really enjoy using flash, but with the lack of iPhone support, I have had to cut back on using it on projects. I sort of figured this would be the direction Adobe would go rather than trying to find all of these workarounds for integrating flash.

On the other hand, I like the simplicity many websites have switched to with the lack of flash support on mobile devices. That day is over. Welcome back "Loading..." screens. \
post #13 of 79
There's also Tumult's Hype (mac only): http://tumultco.com/hype/
post #14 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

I don't feel Adobe relented to Apple. For this to be this far advanced, Adobe had to have Edge in the works for quite a while, don't you think? I just wonder why they never mentioned it back when it would have been a great answer to Apple's decision not to support Flash on iDevices.

This is a question 'cuz I don't know....was Adobe working on this before Apple clotheslined them? Can a software company come this far, this fast with a product like this?

Oh come on! Apple introduced the iOS in 2007. Adobe has done nothing but kick and scream ever since then about Apple's "heavy-handed, closed, proprietary, walled-garden" approach towards Flash. Apple had everything to do with Adobe getting its butt in gear!

Apple showed the world how inept and unprepared Adobe was back then, and Adobe did just fine on its own showing how clueless they were. Mobile Flash was beta at the best, and the endless security flaws and updates just made it worse.

Flash is essentially broken and out-dated no matter how the iHaters try to spin it. I seriously doubt that Adobe had anything remotely HTML5-related till at least a couple/few years after the iPhone.

I'd bet that once Adobe saw how truly successful the iPad had become, and the anemic Android Flash-capable tablets were, Adobe saw the writing on the wall: Adapt or die.

Case closed.
post #15 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

My only question is why Adobe wasn't out in front of HTML5 tool development from the beginning.

And why don't they have better tools for converting Flash projects to iOS and Android apps? It's there, but also not quite there, if ya know what I mean.
post #16 of 79
Sorry, but WYSIWYG Tools for HTML 5 are DOA.
post #17 of 79
...I hope it does not also promise "Flash-style fan heating".

If it spits out code as "streamlined" as DreamWeaver, We Are Doomed™



Quote:
Originally Posted by mercury99 View Post

Adobe will probably make it part of Creative Suite 6

No, it will be CS 5.6 (Paid Upgrade!)


Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Sorry, but WYSIWYG Tools for HTML 5 are DOA.

So, every designer out there must become a programmer overnight?
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I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
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post #18 of 79
interesting little side-note... reading through the preview EULA revealed that the software will be occasionally and arbitrarily establishing connections to the Internet, and sending info not only on how you use it, but will also sniff out if you happen to have "unauthorized Adobe software" installed on your system…

It goes on to say that if you don't allow these connections, the software may limit its own functions, or cease functioning altogether. It seems to imply that it may disable any 'unauthorized' software that it finds as well… So, Adobe is using the "preview" to do a little pirate hunting?

No doubt a few people will not bother to read this, and get a nasty little surprise… I only hope this doesn't result in any glitches causing perfectly legitimate licensees (like myself) any problems.

I understand the need to mitigate piracy, but… am I the only one bothered by this rather "invasive" arrangement? "You will purchase a license, and we will freely and arbitrarily monitor your usage via the internet. You will allow it, or your licensed software will cease to fully function, if at all…"

It's a trend I find myself disliking more and more. And this from someone who licenses 100% of the software he uses…
post #19 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

interesting little side-note... reading through the preview EULA revealed that the software will be occasionally and arbitrarily establishing connections to the Internet, and sending info not only on how you use it, but will also sniff out if you happen to have "unauthorized Adobe software" installed on your system

It goes on to say that if you don't allow these connections, the software may limit its own functions, or cease functioning altogether. It seems to imply that it may disable any 'unauthorized' software that it finds as well So, Adobe is using the "preview" to do a little pirate hunting?

No doubt a few people will not bother to read this, and get a nasty little surprise I only hope this doesn't result in any glitches causing perfectly legitimate licensees (like myself) any problems.

I understand the need to mitigate piracy, but am I the only one bothered by this rather "invasive" arrangement? "You will purchase a license, and we will freely and arbitrarily monitor your usage via the internet. You will allow it, or your licensed software will cease to fully function, if at all"

It's a trend I find myself disliking more and more. And this from someone who licenses 100% of the software he uses

For Adobe, this has been around since at least Adobe CS3. Sniffs out other CS3 installs on the local network.

In general, have you tried playing recent PC games? Most diabolical. You pretty much have to have a permanent connection with Steam or the horrendous Games For Windows Live.

It is a trend that I definitely dislike. Because guess what, if you're pirating the damn thing, the first thing you do is disable all this background sniffing and checking. So the background sniffing and checking is hammered upon legitimate users!
post #20 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

I don't feel Adobe relented to Apple. For this to be this far advanced, Adobe had to have Edge in the works for quite a while, don't you think? I just wonder why they never mentioned it back when it would have been a great answer to Apple's decision not to support Flash on iDevices.

This is a question 'cuz I don't know....was Adobe working on this before Apple clotheslined them? Can a software company come this far, this fast with a product like this?

I hope you're joking. Adobe had since 2007 to read the writing on the wall.
I'm just curious who explained it to them...

post #21 of 79
Just hoping that
  • The IDE doesn't generate code or offer a graphical library that facilitates non-native flash-like GUI designs.
  • It doesn't require client-side installation of Adobe spyWare/autoStartupWare
  • It will incite designers to no longer design PDFs that run only in Adobe's pdf viewer (requiring the installation of all kinds of Adobe crab (see second item).
post #22 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

My only question is why Adobe wasn't out in front of HTML5 tool development from the beginning.

why should they have? Flash was the golden goose, why would they want to release a competeing product too soom and take money away from a mature product that at this point is in maintenance mode -- the development costs from Flash are long since paid for so copies of that are just basically money in the bank as version changes now a days are minor tweaks barely enough to justify a new version number.
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post #23 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Sorry, but WYSIWYG Tools for HTML 5 are DOA.

...because....?
post #24 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

My only question is why Adobe wasn't out in front of HTML5 tool development from the beginning.

Who is? I don't think I've seen one decent HTML5 IDE.

I don't think this is completely jsut a resposne to Apple, it's a response to HTML5 in general. My only question is why they've made it into a new product? They have Dreamweaver for editing HTML so shouldn't it just be an upgrade to that.
post #25 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

My only question is why Adobe wasn't out in front of HTML5 tool development from the beginning.

Because it was easier for Adobe to bury its head on its a$$ since Flash is/was the status quo.
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post #26 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Sorry, but WYSIWYG Tools for HTML 5 are DOA.

This is one of the more foolish sentences I've read in the past 24 hours.

And I've been on the "Apple releasing an HDTV" thread in the past 24 hours.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #27 of 79
That is why I use Little Snitch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tribalogical View Post

interesting little side-note... reading through the preview EULA revealed that the software will be occasionally and arbitrarily establishing connections to the Internet, and sending info not only on how you use it, but will also sniff out if you happen to have "unauthorized Adobe software" installed on your system

It goes on to say that if you don't allow these connections, the software may limit its own functions, or cease functioning altogether. It seems to imply that it may disable any 'unauthorized' software that it finds as well So, Adobe is using the "preview" to do a little pirate hunting?

No doubt a few people will not bother to read this, and get a nasty little surprise I only hope this doesn't result in any glitches causing perfectly legitimate licensees (like myself) any problems.

I understand the need to mitigate piracy, but am I the only one bothered by this rather "invasive" arrangement? "You will purchase a license, and we will freely and arbitrarily monitor your usage via the internet. You will allow it, or your licensed software will cease to fully function, if at all"

It's a trend I find myself disliking more and more. And this from someone who licenses 100% of the software he uses
post #28 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

That is why I use Little Snitch.

And Adobe is why I block all Adobe applications from the Internet entirely... with Little Snitch.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #29 of 79
Uncle!
post #30 of 79
Meh, I use Hype. The reason Flash sucks in the first place it because it's overly complicated. Look at those screen shots. Really? They just don't get it anymore.
post #31 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

They just don't get it anymore.

They never did...

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #32 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Sorry, but WYSIWYG Tools for HTML 5 are DOA.

A WYSIWYG tool to replace Flash for developing HTML5/canvas-based animations is absolutely necessary. How will Flash developers ever get on board with HTML5 if they don't have tools that are familiar to them? And what other environment for producing animation doesn't have a graphical development tool?

That said, where can I download click-to-Edge to stop the animations from killing my battery?
post #33 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morky View Post

That said, where can I download click-to-Edge to stop the animations from killing my battery?

HTML5 isn't a battery killer...

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #34 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

My only question is why Adobe wasn't out in front of HTML5 tool development from the beginning.

$$$$$$$
post #35 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

HTML5 isn't a battery killer...

oh we'll see about that. As I've said often enough, often it isn't so much the technology, as it is the reams of crappy developers spewing piles of crappy code taking your browser down to it's knees.

Anyway. This hardly surprising to any of us really, I think this has kinda been known fo a very long time. The flash IDE is a really great platform to develop in, if you actually know what you're doing and aren't a semi hobbyist that is, it's the flash player that truly sucked bollocks for some time. And to those who think flash has been in maintenance mode for years, get a clue. There has been massive changes, often alienating a lot of developers.

Hype is an interesting offering, though very much in it's infancy, I bought it, mainly because 1 I was curious, it isn't super useble yet, though I tried it for a few things, it was cheap as hell, but mainly because instead of sitting on forums mouthing off and whining, I wanted to support another competing product that -isn't- Adobe, I want to see some real competition in this space. I've almost stopped using dreamweaver (bloatweaver...) I've used textmate (awesome) for some time, and recently picked up coda from panic because it's great, and once again, I want to support non adobe products showing promise to be real pro use softwares.

Apple showed at the very least standing up to adobe and kicking in the nads gets them to improve. Perhaps some real alternatives, real -useable- alternatives will force them even further. Maybe buying macromedia will turn out to be like taking in your drug addicted kleptomaniac sociopathic little brother. Ouch.
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post #36 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Sorry, but WYSIWYG Tools for HTML 5 are DOA.

Not so fast. Im too, um, seasoned to jump on the HTML5 bandwagon otherwise.
post #37 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

HTML5 isn't a battery killer...

Badly written HTML5 is just as much a battery killer as badly written Flash.

Well written Flash, just like well written HTML5, is not a battery killer.

The problem is not Flash (or HTML5) it is the person using it.
post #38 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Meh, I use Hype. The reason Flash sucks in the first place it because it's overly complicated. Look at those screen shots. Really? They just don't get it anymore.

Yeah, but, do look at those screen shots. The one main difference, and main advantage, as I see it, with Edge over Hype, is that Edge can open an existing web page and read all the tags. Then, you can apply animation to the individual elements on the page. With Hype, you're building pages from scratch, or building sections from scratch and then having to add them to a web page.
post #39 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

Badly written HTML5 is just as much a battery killer as badly written Flash.

Well written Flash, just like well written HTML5, is not a battery killer.

The problem is not Flash (or HTML5) it is the person using it.

Agreed, at the IDE level. I can't tell you how many times I've gotten shitty code across my desk. Sometimes I've written dodgy code because I had 8 hours to crush something out. Kill it and bill it they say. But Adobe blew chunks on delivering a good flash player for apple.
What I got... 15" i7 w/8 gigs ram,iPad2 64gig wifi, 2.0 mac mini, 2.0 17" imac, appleTv, Still running my old G4 466 upgraded to 1.2GHz maxed ram as a pro tools machine, and 2 iphones.
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What I got... 15" i7 w/8 gigs ram,iPad2 64gig wifi, 2.0 mac mini, 2.0 17" imac, appleTv, Still running my old G4 466 upgraded to 1.2GHz maxed ram as a pro tools machine, and 2 iphones.
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post #40 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by mercury99 View Post

Adobe will probably make it part of Creative Suite 6

And it will cost a thousand dollars and will install fifteen programs you didn't want, ask for or even know it was installing, and drop about 2 Gigabytes of trash in the Library folder.
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