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Apple's Safari grows to 8% browser share, WebKit now second only to Microsoft IE

post #1 of 39
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Apple's Safari browser has now exceeded an 8 percent share of web browser use across all devices, powered by strong growth in iPhone and iPad sales.

The new high water mark for Apple's web browser, combined with Google's popular Chrome browser, also now makes Apple's WebKit the second most widely used rendering engine among web browsers, second only to Microsoft's Internet Explorer and just slightly ahead of Mozilla's Firefox.

According to Net Application's NetMarketShare data, in the last two years, Microsoft's IE has slipped from nearly 67 percent share to just 52.8, while Firefox use has slipped slightly from almost 23 percent to July's reported 21.48. Google's Chrome as exploded from 2.84 percent to 13.45 percent, while Apple's Safari share has nearly doubled from 4.07 percent to 8.05 percent.

Chrome and Safari combined now represent more than 21.5 percent of web users, slightly ahead of Firefox even before adding in a small number of alternative WebKit browsers.

A decade ago, Microsoft's share of web browsing with the Windows-bundled IE reached such overwhelmingly high numbers that it appeared unlikely that any other browser could ever gain more than a scrap of market share, given the apparent lack of any profit incentive to develop an alternative web browser.

The failing Netscape Navigator browser was eventually spun off into an open source project that resulted in Mozilla, which developed the Firefox browser. Its advantages in speed and other features, combined with its independence from Microsoft, quickly created an avid following among both PC and Mac users.



The Rise of Safari and WebKit

In 2003, Apple debuted work on its own Safari browser, after Microsoft stopped actively developing IE for the Mac. Apple leveraged the existing, open source KHTML rendering engine, which it forked to deliver WebCore, a parallel project Apple continued to maintain under the GNU LGPL.

Two years later, Apple released its entire layout engine for Safari under the more permissive BSD license, naming the entire package WebKit. This package proved to be far more valuable to third parties than just the core KHTML-based rendering engine, causing WebKit to immediately be adopted by Nokia for use in its smartphone web browser for Symbian.

Google later adopted WebKit for use in both its desktop Chrome and mobile Android browsers. RIM's modern BlackBerry 6.0 browser and HP's webOS browser and entire application runtime are also based on WebKit, as are the majority of other mobile browsers, including Amazon's latest Kindle browser. WebKit is also used within a variety of applications, ranging from Apple's own Mail, iTunes and Dashboard to Adobe's AIR and Creative Suite CS5 and Valve's Steam gaming platform.

Widespread use of WebKit has enabled Apple (and other WebKit developers) to rapidly deliver and deploy new web standards ranging from Apple's Canvas to a variety of enhancements to CSS, HTML and SVG, without worrying that there won't be enough modern browsers available to take advantage of the new features. This has enabled the development of a new open platform for sophisticated web applications, commonly referred to as HTML5.

Shifting the industry toward HTML5

Apple's successful development of not just a desktop browser in the model of Firefox but also the creation of Mobile Safari for iOS devices as the first very usable, high performance mainstream mobile browser (something Mozilla has yet to deliver itself) has left a tremendous mark not only on the web browser market but in web-related development as well.

The exclusive use of HTML and JavaScript on Apple's iOS devices without any provision for plugins such as Adobe Flash and Microsoft Silverlight has upended Adobe's control over the deployment of web video and other dynamic content, forcing the company to bring its development tools to an open HTML5 foundation in order to reach the valuable iOS segment of the market.

Microsoft has also largely abandoned Silverlight, its own Flash-like development environment, to instead focus on standard HTML5 tools for building web apps and services.
post #2 of 39
I've been using WebKit for cross-platform development at work and have been mostly happy with it (WebKit specific style sheets behaves quirky on Mac, strangely). Google Chrome is my primary browser on Mac and PC since I gave up on Firefox during the prolonged and buggy Firefox 4 beta.
post #3 of 39
I wonder what WebKit would be based on installations if we count mobile devices.
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post #4 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

I've been using WebKit for cross-platform development at work and have been mostly happy with it (WebKit specific style sheets behaves quirky on Mac, strangely). Google Chrome is my primary browser on Mac and PC since I gave up on Firefox during the prolonged and buggy Firefox 4 beta.

I'm looking forward to the Lion update for Chrome. Full screen is just so much better with the OS support.
post #5 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I wonder what WebKit would be based on installations if we count mobile devices.

The first line of the article suggests that the survey counted mobile devices.
post #6 of 39
This article misses this one important aspect. Apple has had a lot of success with initiatives that leverage opens source concepts to drive industry adoption. WebKit and OpenCL for example have huge followings. Apples significant interest in LLVM and CLANG has given the world an viable alternative to GCC and friends. Even lib dispatch has people falling all over it.

I know that this is under the hood kinda stuff for most but sometimes a strong foundation leads to majestic houses. These really are the building blocks of the future. Not just for Apple either, all sorts of projects have taken an interest in these technologies.
post #7 of 39
Quote:
Microsoft has also largely abandoned Silverlight, its own Flash-like development environment, to instead focus on standard HTML5 tools for building web apps and services

Putting it like that may be taking things a little too far. Microsoft did most certainly not abandon Silverlight, it's still the primary environment for writing WP7 applications, and I think they will continue developing it further. Maybe not for web-based applications, but it's still an important pillar in their mobile strategy, if I remember correctly Windows 8 will even use it for the touch-layer Microsoft is building into it.
post #8 of 39
What's interesting to me is the decline of IE to 53%. It wasn't all that long ago that many web sites required IE to function and Mac users were told to just go away. I remember those days. Now there are blogs and articles out there that talk about Microsoft as a company in decline. The Apple haters have rallied around Google and Android (anything but Apple) and Microsoft is almost never mentioned. Not that MSFT is in trouble but it sure has lost the influence it once had.
post #9 of 39
I just installed the latest WebKit nightly. It looks like they cleared up an issue or two. Though I never saw the scrolling issues others saw it appears to be even better now. It also looks like they fixed the pinch to zoom and scroll problem.

Of course fair warning this is a nightly but it looks very good to me.
post #10 of 39
There's something I don't understand. Apple has way more than 8% of the computer market, and WAY more than 8% of the tablet and smartphone market.

So does this mean that lots of Apple users don't use Safari?
post #11 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

There's something I don't understand. Apple has way more than 8% of the computer market, and WAY more than 8% of the tablet and smartphone market.

So does this mean that lots of Apple users don't use Safari?

I use FireFox. I started using it a few years back when Safari couldn't access my online banking service, and found the add-ons gave a big advantage over Safari. Since Apple opened it up to extensions they are slowly porting over (I noticed a Ghostery extension is now available) so I may switch back eventually, but for now I'm happy with FF.
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Believe nothing, no matter where you heard it, not even if I have said it, if it does not agree with your own reason and your own common sense.
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post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

Putting it like that may be taking things a little too far. Microsoft did most certainly not abandon Silverlight, it's still the primary environment for writing WP7 applications, and I think they will continue developing it further. Maybe not for web-based applications, but it's still an important pillar in their mobile strategy, if I remember correctly Windows 8 will even use it for the touch-layer Microsoft is building into it.

You are right d-range. Daniel is way off. Silverlight is absolute garbage, but it is still a key technology in Microsoft's eyes.
post #13 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

There's something I don't understand. Apple has way more than 8% of the computer market, and WAY more than 8% of the tablet and smartphone market.

So does this mean that lots of Apple users don't use Safari?

I think these are worldwide. I'm sure if you exclude the US and <25, the numbers dwindle significantly, especially if you're talking Safari in a non-iOS environment. But honestly on a mobile device where real estate is limited and your browsing options are few (if at all), these stats are really skewed in telling you anything useful. 99.9% of iphone users use Safari is not a surprise. If you're showing me browser share, tell me numbers based on the customers' software (not hardware) choices.
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

There's something I don't understand. Apple has way more than 8% of the computer market, and WAY more than 8% of the tablet and smartphone market.

So does this mean that lots of Apple users don't use Safari?

There would be a lot of Apple users that don't use Safari, but you need to remember that Apple has more than 8% of new sales for computers, not total computers in use world-wide. In total, Apple has about 60m Macs and say 250m iPads/iPhones/iPod Touches, but there are several billion PCs out there. The funny part of course is that there are still PC's out there in some US corporates running Win95.
post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgberry View Post

The funny part of course is that there are still PC's out there in some US corporates running Win95.

Shows you how good that stuff really is!
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

What's interesting to me is the decline of IE to 53%.

That's what happens when the government is crawling up your ass for a decade.
post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacksons View Post

That's what happens when the government is crawling up your ass for a decade.

More "that's what happens when your browser is a complete piece of trash used only by low-IQ people".

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgberry View Post

You are right d-range. Daniel is way off. Silverlight is absolute garbage, but it is still a key technology in Microsoft's eyes.

Please excuse my ignorance. In what ways is Silverlight garbage? Compared to what? Please remember Silverlight is managed code.
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinN206 View Post

Please excuse my ignorance. In what ways is Silverlight garbage?

It is well known that Microsoft has gotten zero traction with Silverlight. That doesn't mean it is garbage just that it isn't what the market wants. There are only a few sights on the net that even us Silverlight and a good portion of them where paid by MS to use Silverlight.
Quote:
Compared to what?

Compared to nothing! I'm not sure why you would ask that question as failure or success for that matter isn't judged against other hardware.
Quote:
Please remember Silverlight is managed code.

What in the hell is that suppose to mean? Honestly managed code has no advantage over traditional coding methods. At least not with what passes for modern programming languages. Frankly the market has grown pretty sour on C# and some of MS other initiatives.
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacksons View Post

Shows you how good that stuff really is!

In industry the mentality is DFWI {Don't Fûćh With It}. Often an upgrade is extremely painful and expensive. Especially if custom hardware or software is involved. It isn't a question of good or bad but rather time and money.

Heck I worked on a machine for years that still used tubes because validation of more modern hardware was considered to be too expensive. In this case it was the difference between using components requiring a forklift to those one man could handle.
post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

There's something I don't understand. Apple has way more than 8% of the computer market, and WAY more than 8% of the tablet and smartphone market.

So does this mean that lots of Apple users don't use Safari?


I personally use chrome as the main browser. It has pinnable tabs, more extensions and takes up less screen real estate in both windowed and full screen mode (even in lion). Plus it consistently outdoes safari in terms of HTML5 support.

My secondary browser is webkit nightly.
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post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgberry View Post

You are right d-range. Daniel is way off. Silverlight is absolute garbage, but it is still a key technology in Microsoft's eyes.

No he's not because his context wasn't that M$ has stopped developing SilverLight but they've stopped pushing it for web in favour of HTML.

SilverLight was pushed as an alternative to Flash and Microsoft pushed it as that but now it pushes it as a native app development environment for Win7. In other words it's killed it off as an alternative to Flash.
post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

No he's not because his context wasn't that M$ has stopped developing SilverLight but they've stopped pushing it for web in favour of HTML.

SilverLight was pushed as an alternative to Flash and Microsoft pushed it as that but now it pushes it as a native app development environment for Win7. In other words it's killed it off as an alternative to Flash.

Well, its still used in place of flash on many of M$'s web sites, including their recent mobile event, which was broadcast in silverlight.
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post #24 of 39
Not sure the article is entirely accurate. If we add Safari and Chrome together to get WebKit numbers, we should add together any and all browsers that use the Firefox engine to get Firefox numbers. Flock is based on Firefox, as is the latest release of Netscape according to Wikipedia. Adding those two together with the Firefox numbers would put it over Safari + Chrome. I'm sure some of the others may use WebKit and/or Firefox as well. What's the Playstation browser based on? I believe the Wii's browser is Opera.
post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

There's something I don't understand. Apple has way more than 8% of the computer market, and WAY more than 8% of the tablet and smartphone market.

So does this mean that lots of Apple users don't use Safari?

I'm not a fan of Safari and only use it in my iPhones. I use Google Chrome on my home and work Macs. And, on Windows, too.
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

I just installed the latest WebKit nightly. It looks like they cleared up an issue or two. Though I never saw the scrolling issues others saw it appears to be even better now. It also looks like they fixed the pinch to zoom and scroll problem.

Of course fair warning this is a nightly but it looks very good to me.

They still haven't switched completely over to WebKit2 which when that happens will be a big improvement for Safari and the likes of Epiphany on Linux.

A ton of work has been going into WebKit2. What is in Lion hasn't gotten to a point where it's showing half of what it will eventually be able to do.
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

More "that's what happens when your browser is a complete piece of trash used only by low-IQ people".

Statistically there are more people without a high IQ than with one, so that doesn't explain the decline in marketshare at all.
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

Putting it like that may be taking things a little too far.

You need to pay attention to the author. It's well known that Dilger is pretty well clueless outside of the Apple product range.

Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

if I remember correctly Windows 8 will even use it for the touch-layer Microsoft is building into it.

The official line from Microsoft is that the Windows 8 "tailored UI" will be "HTML 5". It wasn't a slip of the tongue either, I heard 3 or 4 different Redmondians say it about 20 times.

When quizzed about the use of other languages for the creation of "tailored UI" applications Microsoft have consistently pointed to BUILD in September as the reveal date.

If Silverlight is supported, why they wouldn't just say Silverlight is supported is anyones guess.

There have been a lot of credible rumors that Silverlight will be the common platform for Windows 8 desktop, Windows 8 tablet, Windows Phone and Xbox... so things just aren't quite adding up at the moment.

The Silverlight platform and development environment are absolutely class leading, so what I really really hope Microsoft do is allow the compilation of W3C Widgets in HTML/CSS/JavaScript from a Silverlight project. That would be ideal and something of a game changer.

Microsoft being Microsoft though, I'm not going to hold my breath.
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by snoitan View Post

... we should add together any and all browsers that use the Firefox engine to get Firefox numbers. Flock is based on Firefox, as is the latest release of Netscape according to Wikipedia. ...

You do understand that Flock is dead, don't you? Now, for your larger point. Firefox is the most popular Gecko-based browser. Flock was based on Gecko as are Seamonkey, the Mac-exclusive Camino, and others.
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Statistically there are more people without a high IQ than with one, so that doesn't explain the decline in marketshare at all.

I like to pretend that people are getting smarter. Forgive me for being an optimist.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
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post #31 of 39
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedalmatian View Post

This made me laugh today...http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14370878

This is fantastic. I am particularly taken aback by the following paragraph:

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBC News


AptiQuant stressed that using IE doesn't mean you have low intelligence. "What it really says is that if you have a low IQ then there are high chances that you use Internet Explorer," said AptiQuant CEO Leonard Howard.

Leonard Howard appears to be saying that Internet Explorer doesn't make you stupid, it only indicates that you are stupid.
post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

There's something I don't understand. Apple has way more than 8% of the computer market, and WAY more than 8% of the tablet and smartphone market.

So does this mean that lots of Apple users don't use Safari?


i think this is only the "large" OS's (aka traditional laptop/desktop + some older tablets)

translated to: Window's XP/Vista/7 + Mac OSX + Linux.

on the other hand-- GO SAFARI/OPERA/CHROME!!!! destroy IE!

PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

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PC means personal computer.  

i have processing issues, mostly trying to get my ideas into speech and text.

if i say something confusing please tell me!

Reply
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinN206 View Post

Please excuse my ignorance. In what ways is Silverlight garbage? Compared to what? Please remember Silverlight is managed code.

People who know what they are talking about usually put some arguments in their statements.

Which makes previous poster's statement only his personal opinion based on nothing much, and nothing much more than that.
post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

Leonard Howard appears to be saying that Internet Explorer doesn't make you stupid, it only indicates that you are stupid.

Well that wasn't what he was saying, but I assume you're just being facetious.

Edit: turns out it was just a hoax anyway.
post #36 of 39
People still use IE? Chrome is the way to go (and I can forgive Firefox).

Does this survey include iOS devices? Because I'm sure Safari gets a huge boost being mobile and desktop browser.
TalkAndroid anyone?
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TalkAndroid anyone?
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post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

What's interesting to me is the decline of IE to 53%. It wasn't all that long ago that many web sites required IE to function and Mac users were told to just go away. I remember those days.

So do I. Apple developing Safari is one of the least credited reasons for the resurgence of the Mac.

Only when I was satisfied the days of Mac blocking on the web were over, I switched in 2008 and still have no regrets.

Safari 5.1 on Lion is the best and quickest browser out there...IMO that is.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Me View Post

This is fantastic. I am particularly taken aback by the following paragraph:


Leonard Howard appears to be saying that Internet Explorer doesn't make you stupid, it only indicates that you are stupid.

Yet today the entire story of IE use having any relationship to IQ was exposed as a scam report, an elaborate ruse picked up and repeated by the news media. You'd think they'd do a bit more checking before running with a story that had the smell of a hoax from the beginning.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-14370878
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackTheRat View Post

Safari 5.1 on Lion is the best and quickest browser out there...IMO that is.

Minus the memory leak that takes up all of your physical RAM and gigabytes of swap space, yes.

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply

Originally Posted by Marvin

The only thing more insecure than Android’s OS is its userbase.
Reply
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