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Apple seen merging iOS, Mac OS X with custom A6 chip in 2012 - Page 4

post #121 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post

which is why I clairifed what was meant by the term "niche."

No shortsightedness here.

mobile devices are not "taking over computing." they are simply used much more frequently for menial and casual tasks. Are they taking over the "little things?" sure. It's simply more convenient.

but for actual computing, be it typing a document, graphic design, video editing, audio work, financial systems, etc. a "real" computer is required.

Mobile devices with added power are great because of this fact: They are GAINING features.

Desktops and notebooks are great because they are also always GAINING capabilities, which they already have in spades over mobile devices.

Apple is currently on a trend of artificially introducing a convenience by dumbing down the Mac, which is ridiculous. They are missing the boat here. sure, there will be some things that makes sense to crossover. then do that. but don't cripple the mac, just so the marketing team can put the money making iPhone next to the MBP on the website homepage...

Mobile device will always be a device that we use for the convenient little things. It makes sense that we use them more and certain things are integrated. But they will never be a replacement for a desktop or notebook.

People buy a laptop and keep it for many years. People replace their phone every year or so. that's how Nokia sold so many handsets and it is also selling tons of iPhones.

the sales are not due to a better OS or a trend in taking over computing. They are due to different dynamics in how various devices, however integrated, are used, discarded, and purchased.

The Mac should always be the definitive, "you can do anything, do it right, and do it easily" platform. Mobile devices may be used a lot (especially where phone calls are concerned... - or casual gaming, or fun apps, etc, but they will always be a "niche" in terms of real computing.

there are some benefits to a hyper mobile platform and there are some to a station, mobile or otherwise. the point is that , while the mobile is being upgraded, it is a horrible thing to cripple the superior platform just to make the mobile platform look better, which is most certainly the trend here. And FCP X is just the beginning. "hey, let's take the iPhone version of iMovie, sell it on the Mac and call it Final Cut Pro!" no thanks.

(And yes, I am aware that FCP X is far greater than the iOS iMovie. LOL.. But it is an obvious bow to that software and it's platform and is also an obvious warning sign of what happens when apple engineers follow that philosophy.

TL;DR
I was walking in the opposite direction during the revolution and now I can't even see it from here.
post #122 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

Rosetta wasn't an emulator, it was a dynamic binary translator. And I agree that it was quite good.

On the other hand, emulating or translating x86 correctly is orders of magnitude more difficult than what Rosetta had to do with with power pc for lots of reasons including variable length instructions implicit instruction registers, correct interrupt handling, the sheer number of instructions, etc. Particularly as Apple continues to support and use complex extensions to the x86 instruction set.

Transmeta used custom hardware to accelerate x86 translation in their chips and they just couldn't keep up with Intel's process advances. Maybe Apple could graft on a hardware translation accelerator to the A6, but I imagine that Intel owns most of the patents that they would need, given that they purchased Transmeta's IP. Also, Apple wouldn't get an x86 license so probably couldn't do such a thing even if it were unencumbered.

All things are possible over a period of 10 years, but i doubt we'd see Apple trying to translate x86 on a lowish power ARM cpu.

The other thing people need to realize here is that when Apple went from PPC to Intel there was a huge jump in integer performance. It is no surprise that Intel could emulate/translate PPC code so well. The intel hardware had like 3x the performance of PPC.

Now with ARM everything is reversed, they simply don't have the performance.
post #123 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbsteph View Post

And people have been panning Windows 8 for merging traditional Windows with touch screen capabilities claiming it can't be done successfully.

And even Apple, Steve Jobs himself, complained that trying to have the same OS on mobile touch-based devices and traditional computers was a bad idea. They bragged that the iOS was "built from the ground up" for mobile touch devices.

How is putting a mobile touch device OS on a traditional computer any better than putting a traditional computer OS on a mobile touch device? The argued from the very beginning that these are two different uses and deserve to have different OSes (even if the OSes share similar foundations).

So either they were right and now, starting with Lion, they choose to ignore their own advice. Or they were lying through their teeth when they said that a mobile device should have a different OS than a traditional computer.

Personally, I think they were right in the first place; and they are now going down a bad path. But then again, I use my devices for more than checking my FB page and playing Angry Birds.
post #124 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by 9secondko View Post

which is why I clairifed what was meant by the term "niche."

No shortsightedness here.

mobile devices are not "taking over computing." they are simply used much more frequently for menial and casual tasks. Are they taking over the "little things?" sure. It's simply more convenient.

but for actual computing, be it typing a document, graphic design, video editing, audio work, financial systems, etc. a "real" computer is required.

Mobile devices with added power are great because of this fact: They are GAINING features.

Desktops and notebooks are great because they are also always GAINING capabilities, which they already have in spades over mobile devices.

Apple is currently on a trend of artificially introducing a convenience by dumbing down the Mac, which is ridiculous. They are missing the boat here. sure, there will be some things that makes sense to crossover. then do that. but don't cripple the mac, just so the marketing team can put the money making iPhone next to the MBP on the website homepage...

Mobile device will always be a device that we use for the convenient little things. It makes sense that we use them more and certain things are integrated. But they will never be a replacement for a desktop or notebook.

People buy a laptop and keep it for many years. People replace their phone every year or so. that's how Nokia sold so many handsets and it is also selling tons of iPhones.

the sales are not due to a better OS or a trend in taking over computing. They are due to different dynamics in how various devices, however integrated, are used, discarded, and purchased.

The Mac should always be the definitive, "you can do anything, do it right, and do it easily" platform. Mobile devices may be used a lot (especially where phone calls are concerned... - or casual gaming, or fun apps, etc, but they will always be a "niche" in terms of real computing.

there are some benefits to a hyper mobile platform and there are some to a station, mobile or otherwise. the point is that , while the mobile is being upgraded, it is a horrible thing to cripple the superior platform just to make the mobile platform look better, which is most certainly the trend here. And FCP X is just the beginning. "hey, let's take the iPhone version of iMovie, sell it on the Mac and call it Final Cut Pro!" no thanks.

(And yes, I am aware that FCP X is far greater than the iOS iMovie. LOL.. But it is an obvious bow to that software and it's platform and is also an obvious warning sign of what happens when apple engineers follow that philosophy.

The mistake with your reasoning is that you are defining the needs/solutions of today and using that to extrapolate the needs/solutions of the future.

The smallest iPhone 1 is much more of a "real" computer (whatever that is) then the one which was used to put a man on the moon.

And, iOS is much more of a "real" OS!
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post #125 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Is it OK to call a fellow commenter a pompous windbag?

I can handle a few insults. I probably deserve it for one thing or another. My intent wasn't to be a jerk or make anyone feel bad but to try and encourage some understanding for others.
Pompous windbag here, over and out.
Edit: I really don't understand people's unwillingness to reassess their use of one simple word. It would make things a bit easier for developmentally disabled people and their families. And it costs you nothing. No charges will appear on your bill.
post #126 of 186
I can't believe that Apple is stupid enough to replace OSX with an IOS blend. I detest most of the IOS system to the point where i no longer use My iPod touch except as a GPS guidance system. Most of the IOS features in Lion are good only because they can be turned off.

I have arthritis in my hands and I am not alone. The multifinger motions are painful. I even use a mouse on my laptop.
Apple seems to be so fascinated by the success of IOS hardware that they have lost track of the fact that most computer users have big screens and don't need adaptations to run apps on a screen under 12 inches. If this prediction is correct, I can see Apple Producing touch screen computers and declaring the mouse era dead.

I cannot envision buying Mac software That is an IOS clone. When that day comes my OS will become Linux
post #127 of 186
Mac OSX will NEVER see anything weaker than Sandy Bridge!

Apple increments product features one bite at a time...hence the logo. Want the next big thing? You're gonna have to pick another fruit from the Apple Tree.

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Apple increments product features one bite at a time...hence the logo. Want the next big thing? You're gonna have to pick another fruit from the Apple Tree.

Reply
post #128 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBlongz View Post

Mac OSX will NEVER see anything weaker than Sandy Bridge!

Mind elaborating on that?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #129 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

More like 2020 for the culmination of these trends, and the idea that something will be running OS X on ARM next year is just silly.

Something already does if you believe the rumors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

And is it really worthwhile at all to speculate about something that might happen in the computer industry 10 years or more from now? No one in 1999 had any idea what the computer landscape of today would look like although I'm sure you could find lots of folks back then who would tell you they did.

If you state that it is impossible to predict the state of the computer industry 10 years from now it's hard to argue against that. But I wonder, what paradigm shifts did I mis the last 10 years?

J.
post #130 of 186
"Apple is looking to merge its iOS and Mac OS X operating systems into one unified platform for applications and cloud services as soon as next year"

Exactly what problem is this attempting to solve? What is driving this?
post #131 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by charley2 View Post

... If this prediction is correct, I can see Apple Producing touch screen computers and declaring the mouse era dead.

The mouse era may be at an end, but like it's predecessor, the keyboard, it will survive for a long time.

J.
post #132 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

Something already does if you believe the rumors.



If you state that it is impossible to predict the state of the computer industry 10 years from now it's hard to argue against that. But I wonder, what paradigm shifts did I mis the last 10 years?

J.

Umm... say maybe the widespread (hopefully temporary) end of frequency scaling and the corresponding shift to parallel architectures like multicore processors and GPUs? Even though this wasn't exactly unpredicted in the research community it wasn't common AppleInsider-level knowledge.
post #133 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

The mouse era may be at an end, but like it's predecessor, the keyboard, it will survive for a long time.

J.

Don't need none of that fancy-schmancy stuff...

A "real" computer pro can do anything with 8 bit switches and a toggle
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post #134 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gustav View Post

Rosetta and the 68K emulator on PowerMacs were quite good actually. I don't know how you can say they "sucked pretty hard."

Actually, the 68K emulator was largely responsible for the abysmal file I/O performance in all the later versions of Mac OS. It was never rewritten from 68K assembly IIRC.
post #135 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

The other thing people need to realize here is that when Apple went from PPC to Intel there was a huge jump in integer performance. It is no surprise that Intel could emulate/translate PPC code so well. The intel hardware had like 3x the performance of PPC.

Now with ARM everything is reversed, they simply don't have the performance.

It isn't difficult to emulate the x86 instruction set if there is no need for it.

J.
post #136 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor David View Post

TL;DR
I was walking in the opposite direction during the revolution and now I can't even see it from here.

Now, That's funny!
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post #137 of 186
Let me ask a simple question - why would Apple invest so much with Intel in Thunderbolt technology if they knew they were abandoning the platform a mere few years later? That makes absolutely no sense. Thunderbolt *requires* an Intel processor, and Intel's Sandy Bridge chips are extremely power-efficient and only getting better.

It makes perfect sense that OS X and iOS will eventually merge together, but if anything, I see Apple pulling a Windows 8, having a version of each OS running on their respective x86 and ARM platforms. I just can't see Apple transition everything over to ARM when ARM itself has so much catching up to do just to match current desktop speeds, while Intel and AMD continue to push the limits of x86 even further. I call BS on this analyst.
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post #138 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

Umm... say maybe the widespread (hopefully temporary) end of frequency scaling and the corresponding shift to parallel architectures like multicore processors and GPUs? Even though this wasn't exactly unpredicted in the research community it wasn't common AppleInsider-level knowledge.

Didn't mis that, I would use other words to say the same though.

J.
post #139 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Don't need none of that fancy-schmancy stuff...

A "real" computer pro can do anything with 8 bit switches and a toggle

Connecting wires is sufficient I would say.

J.
post #140 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jnjnjn View Post

It isn't difficult to emulate the x86 instruction set if there is no need for it.

J.

And therein lies the problem: there is a need for it. One of the main reasons the Mac has steadily gained in popularity over the past several years is its chameleon-like abilities to run *any* OS running on an Intel chip (for me, that's Mac OSX, Windows, Linux, and FreeBSD). Even if someone never *intends* to run Windows on the machine, knowing they can if they have to is a big safety blanket and convinces a lot of people to buy Macs rather than go with a Windows box.

If some new Apple laptop/whatever product lost this ability, I suspect it would not become amazingly popular as a general-purpose computing device, even if it ran all of the iOS/Tablet/iPhone/iWhatever software.

On two different topic paths:

1) Maybe an A6 processor would contain both ARM and X86 ISAs and would be capable of running both instruction sets natively. That sort of thing has been done before and most of the transistors on a CPU these days are cache; adding an ARM ISA to an x86 chip wouldn't be that hard.

2) Everyone seems to be assuming that "merging iOS and OSX" means that OSX becomes iOS. You could still merge them and wind up with something that is more like OSX, eh?
post #141 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhyde View Post

1) Maybe an A6 processor would contain both ARM and X86 ISAs and would be capable of running both instruction sets natively. That sort of thing has been done before and most of the transistors on a CPU these days are cache; adding an ARM ISA to an x86 chip wouldn't be that hard.

This depends on Intel because a) Apple doesn't have a license to build x86 compatible processors and b) Intel owns all of Transmeta's IP which presumably covers most of the IP required to effectively do this sort of thing. If Apple can convince Intel to fab the A6 (as suggested by an earlier response) then maybe we could see this.
post #142 of 186
Yes Apple borrowed from iOS but example they could have added versioning and resume features without removing the Save As... item from the file menu. Why they decided to do so? Just because of the way iOS apps work. Instant On.

Whatever you were working on reappears after closing. Thats fine and dandy but I want to be able to save a file manually for sharing or anything else. I want control.

Also, hate the command left click in a windows title bar no longer shows that document or folders path. Launchpad I can live without. Mission control SHOULD be separate, its a memory hog now. I don't want to be forced to use spaces or dashboard. If I only want to use expose, i should be allowed to do so. Aesthetically, Snow Leopard looked better. The login screen/window, the aqua buttons, ical, address book etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tails View Post

Lion uses certain "ideas" from iOS. Other than that it's basically the same as Snow Leopard.

Merging iOS with OS X is more than changing the looks of scrollbars. iOS does not have a visible filesystem. OS X without a visible file system won't be usable even in 2016. And there are a million other things like that.
post #143 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

"Apple is looking to merge its iOS and Mac OS X operating systems into one unified platform for applications and cloud services as soon as next year"

Exactly what problem is this attempting to solve? What is driving this?

The problem that you thought never existed until Apple came up with a solution.

What's the matter with you, don't you know by now that that's what Apple does and that's why they're so successful? :-)
post #144 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBlongz View Post

Mac OSX will NEVER see anything weaker than Sandy Bridge!

True, but OS 11 (or whatever it becomes) might be a totally different animal and OS X will continue on Pro models for a long while until the newer stuff is up to needed level of performance. Jobs has stated that Apple will only work on two OS's at a time. So if they can eventually merge iOS and OSX into one OS, than Apple can work on creating a true web/cloud based OS with icloud that could offset any short comings the merged ios/osx would have.
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post #145 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by jukes View Post

This depends on Intel because a) Apple doesn't have a license to build x86 compatible processors and b) Intel owns all of Transmeta's IP which presumably covers most of the IP required to effectively do this sort of thing. If Apple can convince Intel to fab the A6 (as suggested by an earlier response) then maybe we could see this.

If Apple were able to get Intel to build a custom package which included an A6-An chip as well as an I7-n...

All of Apple's laptops from the Air on up would gain instant on, low battery usage basic tasks (email, web, chat, etc.), and still have sufficient power to do heavy lifting.

They'd become kinda' a hybrid SUV -- somewhere between a post-pc mobile device and a "truck".

And one OS to run them all!
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post #146 of 186
Seriously, there is a specific split between the two platforms for many reasons. They share as much of the foundation as possible and where they don't is an intentional split between the two target platforms.
post #147 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbsteph View Post

And people have been panning Windows 8 for merging traditional Windows with touch screen capabilities claiming it can't be done successfully.

Don't even get me started. I used Windows 3.11 for Pen Computing back in 1995 on freaking touch screen tablets, all the way to the UMPCs. Microsoft PROVED it can't be done successfully, if by "successfully" you mean "a mainstream product that lots of people want to buy." But hey, maybe the 7th time's a charm.

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post #148 of 186
Thanks to Solipsism, Jukes,and Dick (was that a country band in the 60's?), I think I see it. Very interesting.
post #149 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

He doesn't outline anything, so these are valid questions.

But a fully-multitouch desktop OS can easily be done. Its audience is everyone. It's the replacement of the mouse.

And Apple made it clear that they've fully tested a touch interface for a desktop and deliberately split the UI into two camps.
post #150 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhyde View Post

And therein lies the problem: there is a need for it. One of the main reasons the Mac has steadily gained in popularity over the past several years is its chameleon-like abilities to run *any* OS running on an Intel chip (for me, that's Mac OSX, Windows, Linux, and FreeBSD). Even if someone never *intends* to run Windows on the machine, knowing they can if they have to is a big safety blanket and convinces a lot of people to buy Macs rather than go with a Windows box.
...

The point is that this was probably needed to gain traction a few years ago, but now with the iPhone and iPad Apple has almost insurmountable advocates for it's platform and doesn't need the small traction of windows emulation. Especially since windows use is rapidly declining and it's programs can be replaced by a plethora of applications and apps on the Mac platform.

J.
post #151 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

And Apple made it clear that they've fully tested a touch interface for a desktop and deliberately split the UI into two camps.

Nope, Apple made it clear they tested Mac OS X on a touchscreen device. And it sucked. Rightly. Because Mac OS X is designed for one point of input at the size of one pixel (and because at the time, it was Panther, but that's secondary).

Doesn't stop them from making a completely new desktop touch OS.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #152 of 186
Much ado about nothing, really. Next thread.

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John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #153 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

If Apple were able to get Intel to build a custom package which included an A6-An chip as well as an I7-n...

All of Apple's laptops from the Air on up would gain instant on, low battery usage basic tasks (email, web, chat, etc.), and still have sufficient power to do heavy lifting.

They'd become kinda' a hybrid SUV -- somewhere between a post-pc mobile device and a "truck".

And one OS to run them all!

A combination chip is a bad idea especially because of dissipation, which corresponds directly to the number of transistors. Arm is successful in mobile applications because it has a relatively low number of transistors and a 'simple' processor architecture. Intel processors are the opposite because of it's legacy compatibility and it's complicated design.

J.
post #154 of 186
Quote:
For Apple's more traditional and more powerful computers, like the MacBook Pro and Mac desktops, the analyst sees Apple sticking with Intel processors and the current Mac OS X software. But by 2016, he sees all of Apple's Mac devices running on an ARM-based processor like the ones found in the iPhone and iPad.

"Our preliminary view is that Apple can use a 32-bit ARM architecture to address the vast majority of the OS X ecosystem's needs in 2012-13 except for high-end professional devices," he wrote. "When 64-bit ARM is available in 2016, we believe Apple will have a single OS and hardware architecture."

Merging the iOS and Mac OS X platforms would allow users to have content be available and optimized on an even wider range of devices, Misek believes. He sees this strategy being more difficult for Apple to achieve if the company continues to keep its Mac and iOS operating systems separate.


A single OS does not mean a single CPU family. While I can envision a single operating system for all the consumer electronics sold by Apple, it would be foolish to deny the merits of Intel CPUs, the current market leader in technology, performance and design.

While ARM designs have definite advantages, most notably low battery drainage and low heat dissipation, both stemming from low electric consumption and reduced CPU speed, ARM designs are not a match for the power and performance of Intel CPUs.

As is commonly said in business circles, Intel is the current market leader and its leading position is Intel to loose.

Any scenario where ARM designs would become superior to Intel designs rests on one foolish assumption, i.e. that Intel would do nothing between now and then.


ouragan

post #155 of 186
Hi Charley

Takes this as the perspective of another old guy. I really like most aspects of Lion. The bugs aren't even that bad compared to previous OS releases.

Quote:
Originally Posted by charley2 View Post

I can't believe that Apple is stupid enough to replace OSX with an IOS blend. I detest most of the IOS system to the point where i no longer use My iPod touch except as a GPS guidance system. Most of the IOS features in Lion are good only because they can be turned off.

It depends! I really like some of Lions features as it makes the system easier to use. It provides for more convenient usage if you eye sight isn't what it was ten or fifteen years ago.
Quote:
I have arthritis in my hands and I am not alone. The multifinger motions are painful. I even use a mouse on my laptop.

Would you not agree though that that is an issue with everything you need to manipulate? Just because it doesn't work well for you doesn't mean that others have trouble. Frankly my joints aren't what they where either, in part due to a broken hand a few years ago, but pinch to zoom is a god send. Well at least where it has been implemented.
Quote:
Apple seems to be so fascinated by the success of IOS hardware that they have lost track of the fact that most computer users have big screens and don't need adaptations to run apps on a screen under 12 inches. If this prediction is correct, I can see Apple Producing touch screen computers and declaring the mouse era dead.

First I don't think the perdition is correct on the face of it. I can see the two OS'es sharing a lot feature wise but they really target far different use cases with this software.
Quote:
I cannot envision buying Mac software That is an IOS clone. When that day comes my OS will become Linux

I really don't think you have to worry. Everyone is focused on a few minor GUI changes in Lion that they ignore the details of the ENTIRE Lion update. I put entire in caps because Apple has put a lot of effort and polish into the UNIX'y side of Lion. It really is a solid update in many ways. Things that most users never see have not been forgotten. Python has been updated as have many other UNIX utilities. Internals such a Grand Central Dispatch have been enhanced too.

Oh buy the way I'm liking full screen mode for some things. How well it works for any one work flow varies of course but sometimes it pays to put a little effort into adaptation.
post #156 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

You will own a single device, an iPhone 7, say. When you are out and about, it presents the iOS UI on its screen and it works pretty much as a smartphone. When you get home, you can connect it to your monitor, keyboard and other peripherals (perhaps wirelessly, perhaps not) and that opens up the Mac OS functions that you need for large-screen computing (video editing, word processing, software development, etc.).


Sounds like a Motorola Atrix. I wonder if they patented that idea already?
post #157 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by z3r0 View Post

Yes Apple borrowed from iOS but example they could have added versioning and resume features without removing the Save As... item from the file menu.

I'm really like Lion but I have to agree the new saving mechanism sucks. Of course the depends upon user and app but not having the option can sometimes be counter productive.
Quote:
Why they decided to do so? Just because of the way iOS apps work. Instant On.

That is an over simplification if you ask me. I don't reject the auto save mechanism at all, rather I reject the lack of control when I need it.
Quote:
Whatever you were working on reappears after closing. Thats fine and dandy but I want to be able to save a file manually for sharing or anything else. I want control.

I guess we do think a like here.
Quote:
Also, hate the command left click in a windows title bar no longer shows that document or folders path.

Put in a bug report!
Quote:
Launchpad I can live without.

I'm adapting to launch pad pretty quick. In fact I'm about ready to reorganize to make it my primary way to start apps. For me it seems to work better than anything else I've tried.
Quote:
Mission control SHOULD be separate, its a memory hog now. I don't want to be forced to use spaces or dashboard. If I only want to use expose, i should be allowed to do so. Aesthetically, Snow Leopard looked better. The login screen/window, the aqua buttons, ical, address book etc...

That is subjective, something's are better some are worst.

I do want to point out one thing, if you (or anyone for that matter) is having trouble with Safari look seriously at running a WebKit nightly. It looks like a serious regression got into Safari.

Maybe I sound to fanboy'ish here but there is more to like about Lion than to dislike. For those things you really hate look into disabling the feature.
post #158 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by popnfresh View Post

Lion gives you parental controls. iOS doesn't.

They're under 'restrictions' in settings.. It even let's you disable ping
post #159 of 186
Excellent post, wizard69.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #160 of 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddyguido View Post

That be a pretty substantial jump in processing power for just one year from the a5 to something competitive with the core i5. I don't see it unless it's a new product. Plus, there's really no reason to think a MacBook air would be more productive using ios6 than lion or that laptops will suddenly become comfortable to use as touch screens. Why would apple axe their most popular computer completely to make it significantly slower, less ergonomic, and less powerful?

No kidding! This is the same stupid rumor crap still going around. The ARM chip that Apple uses in the A5 and the A6 is at least 5-6 years behind Intel in performance. So like Apple is going to put a processor that's slower than the original Air had in them when they first shipped, yea get real. People stop falling for this BS.
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