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Intel issues 'Ultrabook' reference specs with sub-$710 BOMs

post #1 of 82
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As notebook makers struggle to produce thin-and-light notebooks that compete with Apple's MacBook Air on price, Intel has sent a reference bill of materials to its partners with costs of $475-$650 for 21mm notebooks and $493-$710 for 18mm models, according to an unconfirmed report.

Citing sources at notebook makers, DigiTimes reported Friday that Intel is playing an active role in keeping notebooks in its newly-defined "Ultrabook" class, which brings "tablet-like features" to thin-and-light notebooks, below the $1,000 threshold. The chipmaker's reported BOM does not include assembly costs.

According to the report, Intel will meet with notebook ODM partners in Taiwan next week to discuss its proposed BOM and other details related to the standard. Sources said Intel is already pushing next-generation Ultrabooks based on its 22nm Ivy Bridge CPUs in 2012 and Haswell-based models in 2013.

The company has reportedly rendered five reference designs for 18mm models, which will not include an optical disk drive, including Asustek's upcoming UX21 and UX31 laptops. Despite Intel's efforts to keep Ultrabooks in the sub-$1000 range, the 13.3-inch UX31 will cost $1600.

The publication reported earlier this week that Intel and its partners have been "aggressively searching" for new materials to build chassis for Ultrabook designs. Apple is said to have booked up the majority of capacity for CNC lathes required to build unibody magnesium-aluminum chassis. Ultrabook makers are reportedly considering going with fiberglass instead, a move that could save as much as $50-$100.




According to one report last week, PC makers have struggled to match Apple's pricing with its MacBook Air. Some notebook makers have reportedly discovered that actual production costs for their Ultrabook designs are roughly as high as retail prices for Apple's ultra-lightweight laptops.

Intel unveiled the Ultrabook design guidelines in May at the Computex trade show. Skeptics initially criticized it as no more than a netbook "makeover."

Apple refreshed the MacBook Air line last month, adding Sandy Bridge processors, a high-speed Thunderbolt port and back-lit keyboards. After the Mac maker added an 11.6-inch version and dropped the price of the entry-level MacBook Air to $999 last year, the ultra-thin notebook became a breakout success. The latest version has reportedly sold out at some locations.




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post #2 of 82
Going to be near impossible to hit those price points with acceptable size/performance SSD
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post #3 of 82
If this initiative (and PR move) puts pressure on Apple to lower the cost of the Airs then I'm all for it.

(I'm personally holding out for an Ivy Bridge chipset and hopefully 8 GB of RAM as an option.)
post #4 of 82
As to a BOM that is all it is a Bill Of Materials. It is not a finished machine.
post #5 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

If this initiative (and PR move) puts pressure on Apple to lower the cost of the Airs then I'm all for it.

(I'm personally holding out for an Ivy Bridge chipset and hopefully 8 GB of RAM as an option.)

I'm grabbing an Sandy Bridge Air and then hopefully a 27" Ivy Bridge iMac and then i'm golden. I think the only way PC vendors will find any success is to use inferior components like a cheaper display, no Thunderbolt, backlit KB etc. The Air is competitive for those that are demanding premium features.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

As to a BOM that is all it is a Bill Of Materials. It is not a finished machine.

Yup...if they want decent margins they'll need 2-3x markup on BoM to make money.
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post #6 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Going to be near impossible to hit those price points with acceptable size/performance SSD

Why?

Unless something drastic happens with PC marketshare this form factor is eventually going to be outselling Airs 10 to 1.

Surely with that kind of demand, and PC OEM's all lining up behind the same Intel reference designs, there is going to be enough incentive to drastically increase production capacity for the required parts?

I don't think it will be near impossible to hit MBA price points in 2011, I think it will be impossible... however 2012 should be a different story.
post #7 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Why?

Unless something drastic happens with PC marketshare this form factor is eventually going to be outselling Airs 10 to 1.

Surely with that kind of demand, and PC OEM's all lining up behind the same Intel reference designs, there is going to be enough incentive to drastically increase production capacity for the required parts?

I don't think it will be near impossible to hit MBA price points in 2011, I think it will be impossible... however 2012 should be a different story.

Exactly - nobody will be able to touch the Macbook Air's price point (with a comparable machine) until capacity increases and the BoM decreases in proportion, simply because Apple has already locked up most of the current capacity. When the market for this form factor really starts to explode then economies of scale will bring the BoM down - but Apple has the advantage of being able to get a foot in and dominate as the market grows, which is good for Apple. And if they keep a step ahead of the competition in price as well as quality, which they have every chance to do, then that's good for us as well!

I am really pushing for my company to replace my crap Lenovo S12 with a 4GB/256GB 11" Air this fall. That would be awesome.
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post #8 of 82
It is hard to believe how people can use such an anti-intuitive, awkward and malware-filled operating system as Windows is. Windows is basically maintained by inertia and ignorance.The day the Mac reaches 20% market share, Windows will be history in three years.
post #9 of 82
1) Lame that as usual everyone copies Apple's design
2) More lame that Intel, the sole laptop/desktop provider of Apple is promoting it
(Shouldn't they like a shift away from Windows machines that may have AMD chips?)

Absolutely agreed that people really need to wake up about the crap that is Windows.
post #10 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

It is hard to believe how people can use such an anti-intuitive, awkward and malware-filled operating system as Windows is. Windows is basically maintained by inertia and ignorance.The day the Mac reaches 20% market share, Windows will be history in three years.

Not everyone can afford a Mac. A lot of businesses are too cheap/too reliant on MS Office & crappy IE-only web apps to buy Macs.

OSX will never be the dominate (in terms of marketshare) desktop OS for the same reasons that iOS will never be the dominate smartphone OS.
post #11 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

It is hard to believe how people can use such an anti-intuitive, awkward and malware-filled operating system as Windows is. Windows is basically maintained by inertia and ignorance.The day the Mac reaches 20% market share, Windows will be history in three years.

The problem is that a lot of people buy a Windows Laptop or dektop computer because of price and because they want to play games. Also a lot of people have grown used to Windows and think they'd be having a hard time adjusting to a new operating system. It's that simple.
post #12 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Not everyone can afford a Mac. A lot of businesses are too cheap/too reliant on MS Office & crappy IE-only web apps to buy Macs.

OSX will never be the dominate (in terms of marketshare) desktop OS for the same reasons that iOS will never be the dominate smartphone OS.

I would argue that iOS is already the dominant mobile OS. To have real marketshare, the customer has the actually USE the product the way it was intended. AOL was not the dominant ISP in the 90's just because millions of people used their free discs as drinks coasters.

We know from various published studies that iOS is used as a mobile operating system far more than Android is.

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post #13 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Not everyone can afford a Mac.

And, yet, this article is about how Windows systems are not going to be able to beat the Mac on price.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

A lot of businesses are too cheap/too reliant on MS Office & crappy IE-only web apps to buy Macs.

Amazing how so much ignorance abounds.
Reliant on Office? Perhaps you're not aware that Office has been available on Macs since the beginning.

IE-only web apps? These are actually far less of a problem than they've ever been. I can think of only one site I can't access with my Mac. And I can simply fire up Parallels to get to that site.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

OSX will never be the dominate (in terms of marketshare) desktop OS for the same reasons that iOS will never be the dominate smartphone OS.

I agree that OS X isn't going to be dominant. Too many ignorant people like you spreading FUD.
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post #14 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

OSX will never be the dominate (in terms of marketshare) desktop OS for the same reasons that iOS will never be the dominate smartphone OS.

What reason is that?
post #15 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

And, yet, this article is about how Windows systems are not going to be able to beat the Mac on price.

In one market segment. At this moment in time. Apple rules the $1000+ laptop market segment but doesn't offer a single product in the ~$500 segment. If you want cheap (and obviously cheap != value), Windows or Linux are your only options.

Quote:
Amazing how so much ignorance abounds.
Reliant on Office? Perhaps you're not aware that Office has been available on Macs since the beginning.

Office 2008 for Mac was full of compatibility holes. 2011 is a vast improvement but still doesn't come with the full range of functionality found in the enterprise edition of MS Office for Windows.

Quote:
IE-only web apps? These are actually far less of a problem than they've ever been. I can think of only one site I can't access with my Mac. And I can simply fire up Parallels to get to that site.

You're very lucky. Most companies still rely on horrid IE-only web apps and aren't willing to pay for extra software just to access these apps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2

What reason is that?

There's a race to the bottom that Apple doesn't want to be in. Other manufacturers are willing to give up profits in the search for marketshare.
post #16 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Why?

Unless something drastic happens with PC marketshare this form factor is eventually going to be outselling Airs 10 to 1.

Surely with that kind of demand, and PC OEM's all lining up behind the same Intel reference designs, there is going to be enough incentive to drastically increase production capacity for the required parts?
.

That assumes that PC manufacturers adopt the Ultrabook as their mainstream notebook format. If they do, great, it's about time, and it means my next corporate-issue PC will actually be easy to carry (unlike my 5.5 lb HP "Elitebook"). However, if they can make a sub-$1000 Ultrabook with MacBook Air specs, then they can probably make a 5 lb beast with similar specs for about $500, and there will be a market for that, too.

Windows outsells OS X 9 to 1. That doesn't translate into a 9-1 ratio in every PC category. Macs dominate the market above $1000, for instance. It's hard for Dell or HP to convince many people to spend more than $1000. Apple's cheapest complete system starts at $999.
post #17 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

They seem pretty content on being a niche player, and i think this holds true for OSX as well.

I think this modesty is one of Apple's greatest strengths. It's really interesting how they can at once be in the spotlight and simultaneously retain the underdog title. Sure, plenty of macheads tout Apple's supremacy from the highest of hills, and this only tarnishes Apple's reputation, but still the company continues to maintain said modesty through a concise product portfolio.

Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

while OSX was pretty good OS, it just didnt have any killer features that would tempt me to make the effort to convert, nor was there anything so bad on the windows side that made me want to consider a different OS.

This statement really boils down to an opportunity cost problem and proves that the average Windows user is not only uninformed on how OS X can improve workflow and efficiency, but also cannot readily perceive this disparity quickly enough to let Windows go.

Of course, for average user here, n=1. Still, I would suspect many people here have seen this before.
post #18 of 82
hmm the problem with every bodies comparisons is the fact that these other non apple ultra books Don't have the same specs.

The ux31 from asus will have a core i7 while the 13 inch macbook air only has a core i5. The comparable macbook air to say the ux31 is only $1 cheaper.

They can make them cheaper then the airs if they use the same specs of the air.

Everybody is blasting pc makers here without comparing apples to apples. Full specs of the pc versions of the air have not been released . only processor , generic ssd included .

But from what has been released so far some of these models will go for at least the same price of a comparable air but have faster processors.

So i don't get how people Can bash these yet.

Also to reply to the person above me I posted this from a work supplied macbook pro and i find that osx does not improve my workflow. I find that windows is better for that.
post #19 of 82
Why does Intel hate Apple?

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post #20 of 82
MS adding ARM support to Windows 8 has put a scare into Intel. They do not want to lose their notebook segment. This is a smart move. A move that could also end with lower CPU costs as they are forced to compete with ARM.


Quote:
Originally Posted by majortom1981 View Post

hmm the problem with every bodies[sic] comparisons is the fact that these other non apple ultra books Don't have the same specs.

Onay then, what are these specs and price points?

Quote:
]The ux31 from asus will have a core i7 while the 13 inch macbook air only has a core i5.

What was said that it would be much more than $1000 if they used anything but a Core i3. It's adding Core i7 and an SSD that would push it closer to $2000.

2) Both the 11" and 13" MBA have a Core i7 options.

Quote:
The comparable macbook air to say the ux31 is only $1 cheaper.

Again, show us this spec and price sheet.

Quote:
They can make them cheaper then the airs if they use the same specs of the air.

If you read this article and others from this week you see there is bellyaching because they compete with Apple.

Quote:
Everybody is blasting pc makers here without comparing apples to apples. Full specs of the pc versions of the air have not been released . only processor , generic ssd included .

You make two claims that they are comparable only to say they can't be compared 5 paragraphs later. WTF!

Quote:
But from what has been released so far some of these models will go for at least the same price of a comparable air but have faster processors.

Again, prove it.

Quote:
So i don't get how people Can bash these yet.

I don't get how you can't back up for comments with proof.

Quote:
Also to reply to the person above me I posted this from a work supplied macbook pro and i find that osx does not improve my workflow. I find that windows is better for that.

That's entirely possible as no OS will fit everyone's needs but the general rule of Mac OS X is such that if it's harder for you to do over Windows then you're probably doing it wrong.
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post #21 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

Well, a lot of people actually used AOL back in the day, and i mean used aol as an isp, not just coasters. They WERE the dominant isp in the 90s.

True, last i checked, iOS was used in more devices total than android. However, with the rate of activations ever climbing higher, it shouldnt be too long before android overtakes iOS in that. I doubt apple is concerned at all about this though. They seem pretty content on being a niche player, and i think this holds true for OSX as well.

On that subject, i dont think that many people are motivated to make the change to OSX from windows. I briefly had a macbook pro a few years ago, and while OSX was pretty good OS, it just didnt have any killer features that would tempt me to make the effort to convert, nor was there anything so bad on the windows side that made me want to consider a different OS.

We see reported here and elsewhere that Apple is increasing marketshare in its computer systems at a rate three or four times the industry average QoQ and YoY. And while there is still a lot of ground to claim in the smart mobile device market (especially smartphones), your "niche player" Apple has claimed 2/3s the profit out of the smartphone segment already and still keeps growing. 20% of that market is not a niche player by any reasonable accounting, but if it helps you feel good about yourself keep using the term. Given the number of people growing Apple's share of the PC market, I guess I can safely argue that (inspite of your personal experience) many people are in fact motivated to move from Windows PC to a Mac.
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post #22 of 82
Despite all the talk, the ASUS US21 is not going to ship until September. ASUS completely missed the back-to-school season. Apple was much more timely with the goods, and as a result will benefit the most this year. And next year...Apple will likely have a refreshed MacBook Pro line to fend off the ultra-books.
post #23 of 82
Then I guess they can't all afford PCs as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Not everyone can afford a Mac. A lot of businesses are too cheap/too reliant on MS Office & crappy IE-only web apps to buy Macs.

OSX will never be the dominate (in terms of marketshare) desktop OS for the same reasons that iOS will never be the dominate smartphone OS.
post #24 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by majortom1981 View Post

hmm the problem with every bodies comparisons is the fact that these other non apple ultra books Don't have the same specs.

The ux31 from asus will have a core i7 while the 13 inch macbook air only has a core i5. The comparable macbook air to say the ux31 is only $1 cheaper.

They can make them cheaper then the airs if they use the same specs of the air.

Everybody is blasting pc makers here without comparing apples to apples. Full specs of the pc versions of the air have not been released . only processor , generic ssd included .

But from what has been released so far some of these models will go for at least the same price of a comparable air but have faster processors.

So i don't get how people Can bash these yet.

Also to reply to the person above me I posted this from a work supplied macbook pro and i find that osx does not improve my workflow. I find that windows is better for that.

Unfortunately, in many cases they won't use the same spec as the McBook Airs. Be sure you check the actually class of that core i7 - if it is one of the Celeron i7's then it has down-graded specs from the regular i7 and doesn't perform as well and costs much less. Intel has long provided OEM's a way out of direct competition by using the generic name (core i7 for example) while providing two different performance classes of the chipset - so the OEM can claim its a core i7, but pay for and install the Celeron core i7. The consumer is none the wiser, but gets a marginalized chip.
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post #25 of 82
Let's not overlook the push to optical drive-less machines.


Quote:
Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post

Unfortunately, in many cases they won't use the same spec as the McBook Airs. Be sure you check the actually class of that core i7 - if it is one of the Celeron i7's then it has down-graded specs from the regular i7 and doesn't perform as well and costs much less. Intel has long provided OEM's a way out of direct competition by using the generic name (core i7 for example) while providing two different performance classes of the chipset - so the OEM can claim its a core i7, but pay for and install the Celeron core i7. The consumer is none the wiser, but gets a marginalized chip.

And then there are the different watt class chips. Those SFF 17W LV chips are slower than their 35W breathren at similar price points.
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post #26 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by majjo View Post

Well, a lot of people actually used AOL back in the day, and i mean used aol as an isp, not just coasters. They WERE the dominant isp in the 90s.

True, last i checked, iOS was used in more devices total than android. However, with the rate of activations ever climbing higher, it shouldnt be too long before android overtakes iOS in that. I doubt apple is concerned at all about this though. They seem pretty content on being a niche player, and i think this holds true for OSX as well.

My point was: free stuff that people do not use as intended does not equate to real marketshare. Otherwise, Purble Place (free with every copy of Windows) would be considered the top game on the PC, by marketshare. Ever hear of it?

The reported number of activated Android phones is very deceiving. If a significant fraction of Android devices are effectively used as dumb phones (say 30% here and higher in Asia), and up to 40% of activated Android phones are returned (compared to <2% for iPhones), that means iOS is, and will be for some time, the dominant SMARTPHONE platform. Not DUMBSMARTPHONES or RETURNEDSMARTPHONES marketshare - Android has those categories locked up.

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post #27 of 82
Nowhere near 40% of activated android phones are returned. That entire rumor has already been debunked.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

My point was: free stuff that people do not use as intended does not equate to real marketshare. Otherwise, Purble Place (free with every copy of Windows) would be considered the top game on the PC, by marketshare. Ever hear of it?

The reported number of activated Android phones is very deceiving. If a significant fraction of Android devices are effectively used as dumb phones (say 30% here and higher in Asia), and up to 40% of activated Android phones are returned (compared to <2% for iPhones), that means iOS is, and will be for some time, the dominant SMARTPHONE platform. Not DUMBSMARTPHONES or RETURNEDSMARTPHONES marketshare - Android has those categories locked up.
post #28 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by sltiedeman View Post

Nowhere near 40% of activated android phones are returned. That entire rumor has already been debunked.

What percentage are returned? Are those devices first activated by the user and therefore counted in Android's touted activation numbers?
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post #29 of 82
Unless Apple starts licensing copies of OSX out to computer manufacturers, Windows will never be history. You fail to realize also that most of the malware you complain of is due to the large numbers of Windows computers. As popularity of OSX increases so does vulnerability. Further, I would argue that many if not most of the new converts to OSX machines do not do so because the prefer the OSX operating system. They prefer the design of Apple products, which although expensive, are leaps and bounds beyond any competitor's products. If the machines were not so "pretty", you would not find so many people loving the product. Kudos to Apple for leading the way in design.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

It is hard to believe how people can use such an anti-intuitive, awkward and malware-filled operating system as Windows is. Windows is basically maintained by inertia and ignorance.The day the Mac reaches 20% market share, Windows will be history in three years.
post #30 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Why?

Unless something drastic happens with PC marketshare this form factor is eventually going to be outselling Airs 10 to 1.

Surely with that kind of demand, and PC OEM's all lining up behind the same Intel reference designs, there is going to be enough incentive to drastically increase production capacity for the required parts?

I don't think it will be near impossible to hit MBA price points in 2011, I think it will be impossible... however 2012 should be a different story.

I think that 10 to 1 ratio is misleading. You're comparing the entire PC market to Macs, including the cheapest PCs. Yes, on whole, the entire PC market may sell 10 PCs to 1 Mac, but this article is only discussing a single type of computer. The ultra portable, high quality, non-plastic, non-cheap, damn-that's-nice notebook. This is not a market driven entirely by price point. I don't think you can meet that 10 to 1 ration with only this single type of computer.
post #31 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by zunx View Post

It is hard to believe how people can use such an anti-intuitive, awkward and malware-filled operating system as Windows is. Windows is basically maintained by inertia and ignorance.The day the Mac reaches 20% market share, Windows will be history in three years.

Personally, I disagree. I find Windows 7 to be just as capable and usable as MacOS X. I do admit finding MacOS more aesthetically pleasing. The Windows Aero window especially, is coyote ugly. And yes, there is way more malware aimed at Windows than Macs. But really, if you install an antivirus program - even the free one from Microsoft, refrain from using an admin account for day-to-day use, and deploy just a little common sense; viruses simply aren't that big a risk. Windows is going to be around for a long, long time.
post #32 of 82
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post #33 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbansprawl View Post

1) Lame that as usual everyone copies Apple's design
2) More lame that Intel, the sole laptop/desktop provider of Apple is promoting it
(Shouldn't they like a shift away from Windows machines that may have AMD chips?)

Absolutely agreed that people really need to wake up about the crap that is Windows.

Personally, I'm happy to see manufacturer's copying Apple's designs. I find their hardware especially to be gorgeous. The aluminum MacBooks are seriously Pavlovian. It's about time the other manufacturer's recognized this and started building machines to match this quality. If for some reason I wanted a Windows laptop, I'd want it to be just as nice as an Apple laptop.

Windows is not crap. Why is it all or nothing with some folks. MacOS is great so any competing OS must be complete crap. That's just BS.
post #34 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Not everyone can afford a Mac. A lot of businesses are too cheap/too reliant on MS Office & crappy IE-only web apps to buy Macs.

OSX will never be the dominate (in terms of marketshare) desktop OS for the same reasons that iOS will never be the dominate smartphone OS.

If you're going to call something crap, at least state why it's crap and not just assume everybody agrees with you and understands exactly what you're talking about. Web apps are crap? All of them? BS.
post #35 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aizmov View Post

Why does Intel hate Apple?

Hate sure is a strong word, but Intel should be concerned about Apple. This is partly because Apple has already proven that they're willing to walk away from a chip vendor (IBM and the PowerPC architecture) for something better. There is already rumors of moving away from Intel chips in their laptops to ARM-based systems. Intel should be concerned. But hate, not a chance. Apple is a big customer of Intel products.
post #36 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

What percentage are returned? Are those devices first activated by the user and therefore counted in Android's touted activation numbers?

Google is Highly Motivated to lie about activation numbers - how else would they suck in advertisers and developers? It is almost certain that their "activation" numbers include knock-off low-cost devices sold in Asia that (as reported) do not even include Google apps and may be no more than dumbphones.

And why would Google subtract the numbers of returned activated devices? Because they are not evil? In any case they probably do not have access to those numbers.

The 40% returns number by quote (from both the BGR report and my post) is "up to 40%". Are you really sure that there is no Android phone that gets returned at that rate? Different reports (all unsourced, BTW) indicate that 1) Android phone returns average in the low single digits (this is the same as the iPhone - do you really believe that?), 2) in the low double digits (more believable), and 3) up to 40%.

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post #37 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

I think that 10 to 1 ratio is misleading. You're comparing the entire PC market to Macs, including the cheapest PCs. Yes, on whole, the entire PC market may sell 10 PCs to 1 Mac, but this article is only discussing a single type of computer. The ultra portable, high quality, non-plastic, non-cheap, damn-that's-nice notebook. This is not a market driven entirely by price point. I don't think you can meet that 10 to 1 ration with only this single type of computer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

That assumes that PC manufacturers adopt the Ultrabook as their mainstream notebook format.

Today's cutting edge technology is tomorrows cheap PC right?

I'm certainly not talking about this year. I'm talking about next year (and probably even late next year).

Maybe the model won't be exactly the same as the MBA (it was previously mentioned that OEMs may go with a fiberglass chassis over magnesium-aluminum).

However the fundamentals for thinner lighter laptops are all there. i.e SSD's as standard, no longer the need for an optical drive, no need for a dedicated GPU, low power SoCs are good enough for "normal" users etc etc

Add to that the fact that Windows 8 system requirements are going to be less than Windows 7 and that Windows 8 laptops will be running on ARM SoC's as well as x86...

I'm pretty sure laptops that look like MBA's will be the norm and only people looking for "workstation/desktop replacements" and gamers will be lugging around the heavy laptops we have today.

Intel's target was 40% of notebooks will be in the "Ultrabook" category by the end of 2012. I think they are pretty close with that estimate.

By the end of 2013, who knows... it might be more like 90%
post #38 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by sltiedeman View Post

Nowhere near 40% of activated android phones are returned. That entire rumor has already been debunked.

Can you please cite references to the debunking?
post #39 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Today's cutting edge technology is tomorrows cheap PC right?

I'm certainly not talking about this year. I'm talking about next year (and probably even late next year).

Maybe the model won't be exactly the same as the MBA (it was previously mentioned that OEMs may go with a fiberglass chassis over magnesium-aluminum).

However the fundamentals for thinner lighter laptops are all there. i.e SSD's as standard, no longer the need for an optical drive, no need for a dedicated GPU, low power SoCs are good enough for "normal" users etc etc

Add to that the fact that Windows 8 system requirements are going to be less than Windows 7 and that Windows 8 laptops will be running on ARM SoC's as well as x86...

I'm pretty sure laptops that look like MBA's will be the norm and only people looking for "workstation/desktop replacements" and gamers will be lugging around the heavy laptops we have today.

Intel's target was 40% of books will be in the "Ultrabook" category by the end of 2012. I think they are pretty close with that estimate.

By the end of 2013, who knows... it might be more like 90%

You may be completely correct in your assessment of the future trends. I just know that the future is fluid and I wouldn't just assume something will be true tomorrow because it was true yesterday. (PC to Mac sales ratio).
post #40 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

And yes, there is way more malware aimed at Windows than Macs. But really, if you install an antivirus program - even the free one from Microsoft, refrain from using an admin account for day-to-day use, and deploy just a little common sense; viruses simply aren't that big a risk.

I've never seen a virus on a Mac, but I've never seen a virus on Windows 7 either.

I've seen one on Windows Vista prior to the service packs that involved the user visiting a porn site and clicking on "yes", "yes", "yes", "I agree" about 10 times to install a "codec" so they could view more porn.

Compare that to Windows XP which was like the seventh layer of virus hell. I swear a default XP install would pick up 10 drive-by viruses and rootkits before it even booted.

As well as making sure inexperienced Windows users have Security Essentials installed I also direct them toward IE9 as it consistently comes out in front in the malware blocking.
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