or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Intel Capital creates $300M UltraBook fund to drive thin-and-light designs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Intel Capital creates $300M UltraBook fund to drive thin-and-light designs

post #1 of 63
Thread Starter 
Intel Capital, the strategic investment arm of the world's largest chipmaker, announced on Wednesday a $300 million UltraBook fund to invest in new technologies for its new category of tablet-like notebooks that will challenge Apple's MacBook Air.

The fund will invest in companies "building hardware and software technologies focused on enhancing how people interact with Ultrabooks, achieving all-day usage through longer battery life, enabling innovative physical designs and improved storage capacity," Intel said in a statement announcing the investment.

The company plans to distribute the fund over the next three to four years in hopes of creating a "cycle of innovation and system capabilities" for the new notebook specification.\t

Ultrabook devices are poised to be an important area for innovation in the $261 billion global computer industry, said Arvind Sodhani, president of Intel Capital. The Intel Capital Ultrabook fund will focus on investing in companies building technologies that will help revolutionize the computing experience and morph todays mobile computers into the next must have device.

In 2003, the combination of Intels Centrino technology with built-in WiFi, paired with Intel Capitals $300 million in venture investments and other industry enabling efforts, ushered in the shift from desktop PCs to anytime, anywhere mobile computing. Our announcement today is about Intel mobilizing significant investments to achieve the next historic shift in computing, said Intel Vice President Mooly Eden.

Since 1991, Intel Capital has invested more than $10 billion in over 1,140 companies in 50 countries. Last year, the organization invested $327 million.



Intel's strategy for Ultrabook devices involves three phases: systems based on Intel's 2nd Generation Core processors arriving in time for the 2011 holiday shopping season; "Ivy Bridge"-based Ultrabooks in the first half of 2012; and finally Ultrabooks featuring Intel's 2013 processors, codenamed "Haswell."

The chipmaker unveiled the Ultrabook design in May at the Computex trade show, with an aggressive goal of pushing the specification to a 40 percent share of the consumer laptop market by the end of 2012.



The Ultrabook specification aims to bring laptops under the $1000 range while remaining less than 21mm thick. The devices are also expected to incorporate "tablet-like" features without compromising on performance.

However, Intel's partners have reportedly struggled to keep their forthcoming Ultrabook offerings under the $1000 price tag. For instance, Asustek's 13.3-inch UX31 will sell for $1600, $300 more than Apple's 13.3-inch MacBook Air.

Vendors have struggled to find alternatives to the limited-supply magnesium-aluminum chassis that Apple uses for its ultra-thin laptops. Several PC makers are said to be considering a fiberglass chassis for their first Ultrabook offerings.

Late last week, reports emerged that Intel had released to its partners reference bills of materials ranging from $475 to $710.

The Ultrabook concept follows Apple's lead in applying lessons learned from tablets to portable computers. Apple CEO Steve Jobs said last year that the design team for the MacBook Air asked themselves "What would happen if a MacBook and an iPad hooked up?"

They answered the question by adding instant-on capabilities, extended battery life and solid state storage to the late 2010 MacBook Air, while dropping the entry-level model's price to $999. The refreshed laptop became an instant success.

Apple outdid itself in July with another refresh of the MacBook Air, doubling the laptop's performance by switching to Intel's new Sandy Bridge processors, while also adding the new Thunderbolt I/O and backlit keyboards. Like their predecessors, the new MacBook Airs have quickly become best-selling products for Apple, with some models experiencing temporary stock-outs at certain locations.

post #2 of 63
In the fast moving, ever-changing world of consumer electronics/computers, being the innovator and having a head start on everyone....means everything.

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

Reply

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

Reply
post #3 of 63
Intel supplies the R&D and economy of scale for a milled chassis which will help vendors compete with Apple moving forward whilst giving Intel a solid hold on their CPU market as ARM keeps stepping up. Sounds like a good plan to me.

I do wonder how Apple feels about Intel giving all their competition a leg up.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #4 of 63
So all the other computer manufacturers are so useless that the chip maker has get out both the carrot and the whip to get them to move into the area where Apple is minting money? They can't see it for themselves?

Will they also create a fund to get manufacturers to make a tablet that is actually worth a damn and can compete? Pathetic.

Intel, these are your partners in business. Weep bitter tears...
OSX, because making UNIX user friendly is easier than debugging windows.
Reply
OSX, because making UNIX user friendly is easier than debugging windows.
Reply
post #5 of 63
Let's hope when the 3 upcoming Fabs from Global Foundries come on-line that Apple expands it's ARM assembly with GF and adds AMD Bulldozer based solutions to the Mac family as an option to Intel.
post #6 of 63
In the video it looks like there was a thunderbolt port on the ultrabook, which I applaud. Other then that the video was pretty bad marketing.

Now to the ultrabook concept - in order for it to succeed at what intel drew out in the video, they need software. Really good software that could get long battery life, that could do airplay type functionality, that can take full advantage of the new CPUs, that is optimized for the hardware at hand.

Intel can't provide such software, and neither can any other PC manufacturer at this point. Since MS and Intel have not had the best of times lately, and with MS putting its money on ARM, I think these ultrabooks will seriously lack in software department.

I'm not saying Windows 7 or 8 would not make for a good ultrabook for basic tasks, I just wonder if it can do seamless video feed handoff or deliver ridiculous battery life we know apple will deliver in future MBAs. Plus the iCloud integration would be a big plus in favor of Apple. Though of course it will be available on the windows side as well.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
Reply
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
Reply
post #7 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Let's hope when the 3 upcoming Fabs from Global Foundries come on-line that Apple expands it's ARM assembly with GF and adds AMD Bulldozer based solutions to the Mac family as an option to Intel.

Until now I haven't felt that Apple moving from an exclusive with Intel was possible for their Mac line but this move by Intel seems like it'll be stepping on some toes at Apple.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #8 of 63
So according to that SPOT those ultra laptops can go as high as 3 ghz in cpu speed?
post #9 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

In the video it looks like there was a thunderbolt port on the ultrabook, which I applaud. Other then that the video was pretty bad marketing.

Yeah, that is a Thunderbolt port which makes sense as Intel designed the tech.

Yeah, it's a bad teaser video. Seems like they are marketing toward the same people buying Droids. I'm surprised it didn't transform. It's one explosion away from being directed by Michael Bay.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #10 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Intel Capital, the strategic investment arm of the world's largest chipmaker, announced on Wednesday a $300 million UltraBook fund to invest in new technologies for its new category of tablet-like notebooks that will challenge Apple's MacBook Air.

No need to look further. Apple did all the work for them. I'm sure the competition have already taken apart a MacBook Air to see how the can copy it with cheap, junky components.
post #11 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

No need to look further. Apple did all the work for them. I'm sure the competition have already taken apart a MacBook Air to see how the can copy it with cheap, junky components.

Depends on the company. Asus makes the best prebuilt systems right now (yeah they are better then macs quality wise) so I believe they will place some high quality parts in it. Hp and dell may as well market them as high end paper weights because that's exactly what they will be.
post #12 of 63
Thin-and-light is important but tablets are more important for profit growth in that space. But Intel doesn't make tablet CPU/GPUs so they got to push "Ultrabooks".

Intel will be holding strong but I wonder if some day failing to embrace ARM rather than compete with it will bite Intel in the behind.
post #13 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple v. Samsung View Post

Depends on the company. Asus makes the best prebuilt systems right now (yeah they are better then macs quality wise) so I believe they will place some high quality parts in it. Hp and dell may as well market them as high end paper weights because that's exactly what they will be.

I honestly don't think Asus has anything that even comes close to the latest MacBook Air and MacBook Pro in terms of overall build quality.
post #14 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Intel supplies the R&D and economy of scale for a milled chassis which will help vendors compete with Apple moving forward whilst giving Intel a solid hold on their CPU market as ARM keeps stepping up. Sounds like a good plan to me.

Here here.

My original impression is that we would start to see some pretty huge mergers on the PC OEM front over the next few years (i.e. ASUS+Acer+Lenovo, HP+Dell etc) and we still might, but this offers an alternative.

One thing is for sure... something has to give. There is no way PC OEM's can hope to compete with Apple's economies of scale as the PC industry gets more mobile.

In any case, word on the street is that this isn't simply a move by Intel to "blur the lines between traditional notebooks and tablets" but to quite literally make a tablet.

Watch for Intel to make a relatively reserved push toward Windows 7 ultraportables next year, a pretty big splash with Win8 at the end of 2012 and throw everything they have behind Windows 8 ultraportables/transformers/tablets with Haswell in 2013.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I do wonder how Apple feels about Intel giving all their competition a leg up.

I can't imagine they would be bitter about it. Apple know as well as anyone the position that Intel have been placed in because of ARM.
post #15 of 63
There is something sort of surreal about that video, since it takes place in a world where you have to strenuously pretend Apple doesn't exist. OMG! New idea! (like the Air) Taking it to the next level! (like the Air) like nothing you've ever seen! (besides the Air).

It would have made more sense if Apple still used PowerPC chips, but there's something just weird about Intel trying to goad the rest of their clients into doing something one of their clients is already doing, and behaving as if it hinges on some innovative new thinking. I mean, do they think we don't know about the Air? That we can't see it? That Apple's market share is sufficiently small that they can just play let's pretend?

I understand their motives, but that doesn't make it less distasteful.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #16 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Thin-and-light is important but tablets are more important for profit growth in that space. But Intel doesn't make tablet CPU/GPUs so they got to push "Ultrabooks".

As above... apparently Ultrabooks are a stepping stone toward Intel tablets.

Ultrabook's are instant on, unibody, ultrathin cheap computers with a long battery life, an SSD and based around an Intel SoC.

All they are missing is a tablet OS (which they get with Windows 8) and the demand they need to get the right economies of scale to compete in the tablet market (which they get with PC OEMs following the Intel reference design).
post #17 of 63
"Come on, guys, would one of you at least try to compete with Apple? We'll, like, totally pay you."
post #18 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

As above... apparently Ultrabooks are a stepping stone toward Intel tablets.

Ultrabook's are instant on, unibody, ultrathin cheap computers with a long battery life, an SSD and based around an Intel SoC.

All they are missing is a tablet OS (which they get with Windows 8) and the demand they need to get the right economies of scale to compete in the tablet market (which they get with PC OEMs following the Intel reference design).

Except that it turns out instant on, unibody, ultrathin and long battery life don't come cheap, at least not cheaper than what Apple already is doing.

And there's no reason to think that Intel is going to be able to render a tablet reference platform running Windows 8 that gets anything like the battery life of iOS on ARM.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
Reply
post #19 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Except that it turns out instant on, unibody, ultrathin and long battery life don't come cheap, at least not cheaper than what Apple already is doing

Totally correct.

If Intel had any brains they would pour millions into reference designs for OEMs to use. That way the combined OEM demand for the components in the reference designs would help to achieve the economies of scale that Apple already enjoy.

Heck, if someone happened to make an x86/ARM tablet OS, Intel could even use the combined backing of OEM's following their reference designs to create a range of ultra-portables, tablets and hybrids that share the same base hardware components. That would sure give them a chance to compete against the ARM variants of said tablet OS.

Intel probably won't do any of this though because they are all dumb.
post #20 of 63
This is great news. I don't think my new employer will allow me to run a Mac at work, so an ultra book that is in the same league as a MacBook Air would be extremely welcome!
15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
Reply
15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
Reply
post #21 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ameldrum1 View Post

This is great news. I don't think my new employer will allow me to run a Mac at work, so an ultra book that is in the same league as a MacBook Air would be extremely welcome!

Your optimism is interesting, but possibly misplaced. A MacBook Air is not just about the form factor. That said, why can't you just buy the latest MacBook Air and install Windows BootCamp on it? Most employers are really opening up to this option.
post #22 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Yeah, that is a Thunderbolt port which makes sense as Intel designed the tech.

Yeah, it's a bad teaser video. Seems like they are marketing toward the same people buying Droids. I'm surprised it didn't transform. It's one explosion away from being directed by Michael Bay.

co-designed.
post #23 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Here here.

My original impression is that we would start to see some pretty huge mergers on the PC OEM front over the next few years (i.e. ASUS+Acer+Lenovo, HP+Dell etc) and we still might, but this offers an alternative.

One thing is for sure... something has to give. There is no way PC OEM's can hope to compete with Apple's economies of scale as the PC industry gets more mobile.

In any case, word on the street is that this isn't simply a move by Intel to "blur the lines between traditional notebooks and tablets" but to quite literally make a tablet.

Watch for Intel to make a relatively reserved push toward Windows 7 ultraportables next year, a pretty big splash with Win8 at the end of 2012 and throw everything they have behind Windows 8 ultraportables/transformers/tablets with Haswell in 2013.

I can't imagine they would be bitter about it. Apple know as well as anyone the position that Intel have been placed in because of ARM.

ARM goes against Atom. Intel stepping into the Macbook Air category goes directly at Apple.

Apple won't be thrilled.
post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

ARM goes against Atom. Intel stepping into the Macbook Air category goes directly at Apple.

Apple won't be thrilled.

Intel needs to get into the "tablet" space. Atom or ULV Core isn't going to cut it.

This Ultrabook play is like touching your nose by circling your hand around your head.

Intel needs to get into ARM in a big way. Wouldn't they love to fab even more Apple chips? Apple notwithstanding, they can't keep ignoring ARM. Not in this business and economic climate.

The next MacBook Airs could easily be AMD. In a few years they will be ARM. That is inevitable.
post #25 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple v. Samsung View Post

Depends on the company. Asus makes the best prebuilt systems right now (yeah they are better then macs quality wise) so I believe they will place some high quality parts in it. Hp and dell may as well market them as high end paper weights because that's exactly what they will be.

(yeah! nice joke, quality wise)
post #26 of 63



I love coming to Apple Insider to learn about the inside scoop on ... Asus.

Just keep clicking friends. AI is selling us to Google.
post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Intel needs to get into ARM in a big way. Wouldn't they love to fab even more Apple chips? Apple notwithstanding, they can't keep ignoring ARM. Not in this business and economic climate.

Building ARM chips makes about as much economic sense for Intel as building Windows PCs would for Apple. The problem is that the margin is a fraction of what they make on their own designs. Intel has the best process tech, and could perhaps get a slight premium over other foundries if they entered that business, but it wouldn't even come close to the premium on their x86 processors.

Quote:
The next MacBook Airs could easily be AMD. In a few years they will be ARM. That is inevitable.

It's been a while since I followed AMD closely, but they didn't used to have mobile offerings that could really compete with Intel. Has that changed? As for ARM in the Air, maybe one day - but I don't expect to see it until we have 64bit ARM processors, and that's still some ways off.
post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Intel supplies the R&D and economy of scale for a milled chassis which will help vendors compete with Apple moving forward whilst giving Intel a solid hold on their CPU market as ARM keeps stepping up. Sounds like a good plan to me.

I do wonder how Apple feels about Intel giving all their competition a leg up.

It is staggering really. Intel is stating with its wallet that the only way for others to compete with Apple is for them to all work together and copy Apple's designs. No innovation, no new paradigms, simply blindly copy Apple's lead to survive. Not a good sign for their collective futures.

This also says to me says Intel sees Apple dropping Intel chips in the future and they simply have no choice even if it might accelerate that very process. Apple is only a year or two away from their own chips across all products IMO. I only worry about VMs in that respect and that is becoming less important everyday that goes by for most. I don't know enough about that to know if VMWare could ever run Windows on an A6 or whatever. Perhaps certain Macs could come with an option of an Intel Chip included as a second CPU just for VMs?
Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
Reply
Use duckduckgo.com with Safari, not Google Search
Been using Apples since 1978 and Macs since 1984
Long on AAPL so biased. Strong advocate for separation of technology and politics on AI.
Reply
post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Your optimism is interesting, but possibly misplaced. A MacBook Air is not just about the form factor. That said, why can't you just buy the latest MacBook Air and install Windows BootCamp on it? Most employers are really opening up to this option.

I hope to be able to, just like I do at home; however whilst SOME corporate IT departments are open to this option, many are not. Most sadly have purchasing and maintenance arrangments with a single (or perhaps a couple) of PC vendors. Hopefully this will change over time.
15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
Reply
15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
Reply
post #30 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dickprinter View Post

In the fast moving, ever-changing world of consumer electronics/computers, being the innovator and having a head start on everyone....means everything.

First-mover advantage isn't everything. Apple was the first to make a consumer mass-market GUI-based computer and they lost the crown for more than a decade. Apple wasn't a first-mover for the portable file player market, but now owns it. Innovating isn't everything. Marketing is important, among other things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shen View Post

So all the other computer manufacturers are so useless that the chip maker has get out both the carrot and the whip to get them to move into the area where Apple is minting money? They can't see it for themselves?

Will they also create a fund to get manufacturers to make a tablet that is actually worth a damn and can compete? Pathetic.

Intel, these are your partners in business. Weep bitter tears...

I don't think it's that simple. I think they want to make sure their customers still use their chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Totally correct.

If Intel had any brains they would pour millions into reference designs for OEMs to use. That way the combined OEM demand for the components in the reference designs would help to achieve the economies of scale that Apple already enjoy.

To get that kind of economies of scale, they have to share most of the components, including the shell, making notebook computers a nearly fungible commodity in almost every way, something that was previously only possible with the desktop computers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

co-designed.

I don't know about that.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13924_3-10363956-64.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabbit_Coach View Post

(yeah! nice joke, quality wise)

The quality surveys that show Apple at the top also show Asus at the top too.
post #31 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac'em X View Post

"Come on, guys, would one of you at least try to compete with Apple? We'll, like, totally pay you."

+!
Very well said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

One thing is for sure... something has to give. There is no way PC OEM's can hope to compete with Apple's economies of scale as the PC industry gets more mobile.
.

This is, of course, absurd. There are at least 4 PC vendors who buy more components than Apple and assemble more systems than Apple. More RAM, more motherboards, more CPUs, more video chips, etc. It has nothing to do with economy of scale.

It does have to do with design and good manufacturing processes. Apple has designed their system to be easy to manufacture. Apple has intentionally limited the number of different products they sell (have you tried to make sense of all the different options on Dell or HP's site?) Apple leaves off the things that don't add value. Apple only goes into markets where they think they can competed - which is why you haven't been able to buy an Apple printer or standalone camera for over a decade. Apple reuses design features when possible. Apple focuses on the design where they add value and outsource the production - which is a low margin game.

If any of the PC vendors did the same things, they could compete with Apple on price - easily (especially since their R&D costs are so much lower). But they won't. They're too interested in chasing every last sale and will therefore continue to offer every option under the book and completely redesign their products every 3 months in the misguided hope that their systems will be more attractive that way.

Not to mention that the PC vendors never realized that the high end (profitable) customers don't generally buy on features any more. They're buying on design and the overall package, not whether the processor is 3.1 or 3.2 GHz or the camera 5.3 or 6.1 MP.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #32 of 63
1) Is Intel again using unfair advantage against AMD? AMD can't supply processors for Ultrabooks since Global Foundries sux. (40nm against intels upcoming 3gate 22 nm. They are at least 2 generations after intel at manufacturing.

2) Intel and Apples exclusive agreement has expired. Intel knows that Apple will probably starting to switch to ARM next year. Intel therefore are funding other companies to compete directly with Apple.
post #33 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac'em X View Post

"Come on, guys, would one of you at least try to compete with Apple? We'll, like, totally pay you."

I love it!

I couldn't have said it any better.
post #34 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Let's hope when the 3 upcoming Fabs from Global Foundries come on-line that Apple expands it's ARM assembly with GF and adds AMD Bulldozer based solutions to the Mac family as an option to Intel.

You hope in vain. Apple doesn't like providing options. They would rather pick what they think is best and have you agree with them.
post #35 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Yeah, that is a Thunderbolt port which makes sense as Intel designed the tech ... Developed by Intel (under the code name Light Peak), and brought to market with technical collaboration from Apple.

There .... fixed it for you !
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
Apple is not Appl ...... Please learn the difference!    
Reply
post #36 of 63
I wonder if there's a caveat that says "no Apples need apply." Otherwise, Apple should just march in and claim their $300M. Not that they need it, having more cash than the U.S. Treasury.
post #37 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

+!
Apple leaves off the things that don't add value.

Is that why they left the camera off the original iPad? Your statement is a common meme, but IMO, it is untrue.
post #38 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by xsu View Post

You hope in vain. Apple doesn't like providing options. They would rather pick what they think is best and have you agree with them.

And then when they add the missing basic stuff to the next iteration, you agree again and buy the product again (which too is missing basic stuff, so you will buy it again, and again, and again).

Apple is masterful at taking money from its fans. Again and again and again.
post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

It is staggering really. Intel is stating with its wallet that the only way for others to compete with Apple is for them to all work together and copy Apple's designs. No innovation, no new paradigms, simply blindly copy Apple's lead to survive. Not a good sign for their collective futures.

This also says to me says Intel sees Apple dropping Intel chips in the future and they simply have no choice even if it might accelerate that very process. Apple is only a year or two away from their own chips across all products IMO. I only worry about VMs in that respect and that is becoming less important everyday that goes by for most. I don't know enough about that to know if VMWare could ever run Windows on an A6 or whatever. Perhaps certain Macs could come with an option of an Intel Chip included as a second CPU just for VMs?

Why not buy a second machine? OS X has a large enough software base that losing VM support isn't a big deal. Windows 8 will probably run on ARM anyway, so it could potentially work with an ARM based VM.
post #40 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I do wonder how Apple feels about Intel giving all their competition a leg up.

Does Apple really care? I wonder. Doesn't seem to be so important to have an Intel processor in your device anymore. Too, an actual new kind of device may not be imminent. Apple's focus may be on redesigning and adapting older plays, aka the MBA, the MBP and its mini. We'll have to wait to see if further price reductions are in line for the MBP and Mac mini.

Appel is designing its own chips and I think will eventually adapt them to all their new technologies. Probably the iMac, mini, MacBook Pro and Mac Pro will continue on Intel to keep Intel interested and scared.

I'm so impressed with Apple's pricing structure for its newer devices. What a rule changer this company is! If nothing else, it sure ain't boring at this coral!

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

Reply

When I find time to rewrite the laws of Physics, there'll Finally be some changes made round here!

I am not crazy! Three out of five court appointed psychiatrists said so.

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Intel Capital creates $300M UltraBook fund to drive thin-and-light designs