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Inside IOS 5: new Maps features

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
Apple will deliver a new iOS 5 release this fall, including improvements from the core OS to developer APIs to the interface seen by customers. Among these new changes is a revamped Maps app.

Whats new in Maps

Apple's iOS Maps app is a front end client to the Google Maps web service. While it was rumored that Apple might build its own mapping service or switch to another provider like Microsoft Bing, iOS 5 continues to use Google Maps for its data.

Apple's cleverly easy to use iOS Maps app with direct multitouch manipulation has been confused for being a Google invention. Instead, it simply pulls data from Google and presents it in a way that's simple and fast to browse, making it about as essential as Mobile Safari, and of course much easier to use (particularly for mobile users) than the generic web client Google offers within the browser.

Apple has incrementally added features to its iOS Maps client, including transit and walking directions. The newest version in iOS 5 ads the ability to print maps via AirPrint, as well as emphasizing its suggested directional paths using a glossy, three dimensional tube line.



The new iOS 5 Maps app also has a new feature that suggests multiple routes, allowing the user to chose between a few options before stepping through the directions to the destination. Below, there are three options given for driving from Pixar to Apple, and selecting between them shows distance and approximate driving times. after selecting a route, Maps' directions will then fetch detailed instructions.



iOS Maps vs Google Maps for Android

Apple's Maps client doesn't do everything Google Map's own web client can do, and even lacks some of the features of Google's Android mobile maps client. For example, there's no way to browse in "Google Earth" perspective view, taking advantage of the 3D buildings Google has on its servers. Google has promoted this as a unique feature of tablets running Android 3.0 Honeycomb as part of that operating system's overall 3D interface.



On the iPhone, there's no terrain view showing topography (although the iPad version currently offers this). There's also no support for Google Maps Navigation, a turn by turn service Google began similarly promoting as a unique feature of Google Maps for Android smartphones.



Google's own Maps client for Android also incorporates the company's Places (a clone of Yelp) and Latitude (a clone Loopt). Apple is unlikely to ever add support for either of Google's map add-on services, and also looks unlikely to add Google Navigation support, all of which would directly encroach upon third party iOS developers.

In contrast, Google created Android primarily with the intent of making sure that mobile users were using its services. It therefore has little concern for third party developers of GPS or other location based apps that its Google Maps Navigation app for Android has essentially pushed out of the market.

On the horizon for Maps

Rather than incorporating additional dependence upon Google's proprietary maps enhancements, Apple appears interested in building its own mapping features and client-side enhancements, and may eventually wean itself off of Google's map service entirely, allowing the company to either open up its iOS Maps client to competing map services (as Apple has done in opening mobile web search up to Yahoo and Bing), or potentially building its own maps backend.

Either route toward non-Google mapping would be complex, in part because Apple's Maps client has close integration with Google's map service, but also because Apple weaves a mapping API throughout iOS to enable third parties to present interactive maps within their own apps. While Microsoft, for example, makes its own tools that allow developers to incorporate Bing maps into their apps, Apple's APIs currently only work with Google's mapping service.

Apple was rumored to begin taking steps away from Google maps as early as iOS 5, but that clearly hasn't materialized. At the same time, there is evidence that Apple is looking at enhancing the way it presents maps independently from Google. A recent patent filing for "Schematic Maps" shows Apple is interested in presenting mobile maps that show simplified information, rather than a very complex map including "confusing and inefficient" amounts of detail.



Apple already maintains its own database of location data, and stated it was working on crowd sourcing traffic data that would eventually make it into shipping products in the next couple years.

The company has also acquired small companies with mapping expertise, including Placebase in 2009 and Poly9 last year. The company has also stated an intention to "radically" improve its iPhone Maps application in a recent job listing.
post #2 of 46
I think the schematic maps idea is neat - will look forwards to seeing what comes of that.

As for the changes in iOS 5, I'm very much liking being able to pick from multiple suggested routes - that's a great addition.
post #3 of 46
I hope Apple's mapping licensing, acquisitions and patents come to a head soon. Hopefully as a new feature demoed on the iPhone 5 in the Fall.
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post #4 of 46
While iPhone Maps is one of my favorite apps, I think it's also sometimes one of the most difficult to use.

And while I'm faithful to the iPhone, I do think the ONE huge advantage Android has over the iPhone is their Maps feature. The 3D is cool, and have Navigation built-in is really cool!

I realize there's a small, perhaps thriving, 3d-party market for Navigation apps on the iPhone. But this is really something I wish Apple will build in.
post #5 of 46
I haven't found an iOS turn-by-turn solution that doesn't suck (in my, admittedly, limited search). I've found them hard to use with a cluttered interface. I also haven't liked the iPod integration but that may be a limitation of the iOS APIs.

Any recommendations?
post #6 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesabol View Post

I haven't found an iOS turn-by-turn solution that doesn't suck (in my, admittedly, limited search). I've found them hard to use with a cluttered interface. I also haven't liked the iPod integration but that may be a limitation of the iOS APIs.

Any recommendations?

What have you tried?
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post #7 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesabol View Post

I haven't found an iOS turn-by-turn solution that doesn't suck (in my, admittedly, limited search). I've found them hard to use with a cluttered interface. I also haven't liked the iPod integration but that may be a limitation of the iOS APIs.

Any recommendations?

Check out Wayz.
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post #8 of 46
Quote:
In contrast, Google created Android primarily with the intent of making sure that mobile users were using its services.

Could we have one article without bitterness? Please? Maybe some more Apple is cool stuff, without mentioning anyone else? Pretty Please?
post #9 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesabol View Post

I haven't found an iOS turn-by-turn solution that doesn't suck (in my, admittedly, limited search). I've found them hard to use with a cluttered interface. I also haven't liked the iPod integration but that may be a limitation of the iOS APIs.

Any recommendations?

It depends on whether or not you are willing to pay a bit for it. I've got Tomtom and think it's great.
post #10 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesabol View Post

I haven't found an iOS turn-by-turn solution that doesn't suck (in my, admittedly, limited search). I've found them hard to use with a cluttered interface. I also haven't liked the iPod integration but that may be a limitation of the iOS APIs.

Any recommendations?

One of the oldest turn-by-turn nav apps for the iPhone is from Tom Tom. It's pretty good, and was first to the mobile market with several features. But in the past year TomTom seems to have lost interest in further development of it IMO. The feature set is starting to lag behind it's competitors. And the supposed "live" traffic in the US isn't at all like the European live traffic reporting. There's no crowd-sourcing of gps-enabled phones like the Vodaphone partnership in GB or elsewhere in Europe, with the US version reported as less-reliable by users.

Navigon's Mobile Navigator is more widely used than TomTom's, and better rated by users last I knew. I personally prefer some of their features, with several unmatched by TT. Note that Navigon is owned by Garmin.

Then there's also Garmin's own recently released navigation app for iOS. Unlike it's Android counterpart, the maps are stored on-board rather than on-demand. Having been released in just the past week, the quality/value isn't yet clear. Historically Garmin has been solid with their navigation offerings.
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post #11 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanl View Post

Could we have one article without bitterness? Please? Maybe some more Apple is cool stuff, without mentioning anyone else? Pretty Please?

I don't see that as bitter. It's simply true. And the fact that Android is designed to push Google services onto mobile devices has a bearing on how Google deploys and maintains certain features on their mobile OS. Which different from how Apple deploys and maintains features on their mobile OS.

So in an article on what iOS's mapping services look like, it's pretty natural to talk about how they stack up against the competition, particularly since those service are utilizing the competitions underlying database. And it then makes sense to consider if there are any structural or strategic reasons for perceived differences, beyond engineering chops.
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post #12 of 46
What does Google's 3D stuff do for me? I haven't used it, so maybe I'm missing something, but it looks like it adds visual clutter without enhancing my ability to get around. It's not like I'm flying 100 off the ground so that 3D views of the surrounding buildings from that height help orient me.

People often say it's "cool", but is it helpful in any way beyond eye candy?

I can actually see Google's 3D and Apple's proposed "schematic" maps as being points of divergence between the two companies' approach to mapping. For Google, more info is always better, and they like to show off what their engineers can accomplish. I can see Google's Android maps becoming ever more cluttered, with an ever more complex interface to handle all the possible options (Google X-Ray view! Google avatar chat view! Google material composition analysis view!).

Whereas it strikes me as quintessentially Apple to think a while about what people actually typically want maps for and make that as clean and accessible as possible. And, of course, the Android faithful will glance up format their pulsating, morphing, data encrusted maps and declare Apple's approach to be "boring" and "dated."
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post #13 of 46
The one change that I would like to see in Apple's Maps app is a much, much larger data cache. The programmers seem to have made two assumptions:
1. that all users would always have a data connection to the Internet everywhere they went, and
2. that only a some KBs of storage would be available for caching map data.

Both of these assumptions are wrong and result in very limited usability of the app. At least an order of magnitude increase in cached map data is required to make the app generally usable.
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post #14 of 46
I don't drive regularly but when I do, I like to have a GPS unit in my car rental specially if I'm driving in an unknown city. I've tried using my iPhone but frankly, it's dangerous to use while driving. Besides not having any spoken directions, you have to constantly fiddle with the Maps app to figure out where you are and where you're going.

I've been hoping for Apple to catch up to Android on their maps app but it seems that we're not getting a proper navigation app, just an improved maps app. This is a critical app in any smartphone and Apple seems like they're having a hard time keeping up.
post #15 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesabol View Post

I haven't found an iOS turn-by-turn solution that doesn't suck (in my, admittedly, limited search). I've found them hard to use with a cluttered interface. I also haven't liked the iPod integration but that may be a limitation of the iOS APIs.

Any recommendations?

I've used Navigon, both here and in Europe, for turn-by-turn. Great experience. Price for US version is reasonable, whereas the European version was more pricey, but absolutely essential if you are driving there.

You don't need the extra charges for the 3D effect, or for traffic, in my opinion, although some may find it useful if you are commuting - but then again, you typically don't need traffic for day to day navigation, and I use it for out of town use mostly.

I also use it for point-of-interest searches, since Google doesn't give turn by turn on the iphone, but Navigon also uses Google search to hunt for POI's also,which makes uploading the navigation into the Navigon seamless.

Anyhow, Navigon and Tom-tom seem to be the most recommended, at least for iphone and ipad use.
post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Whereas it strikes me as quintessentially Apple to think a while about what people actually typically want maps for and make that as clean and accessible as possible. And, of course, the Android faithful will glance up format their pulsating, morphing, data encrusted maps and declare Apple's approach to be "boring" and "dated."

Others have already studied what Apple has implied they've uniquely discovered with their schematic maps. Think this creation from last year, LineDrive Maps, might be eerily similar to Apple's idea?

http://www.gpsreview.net/line-drive-maps/
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post #17 of 46
Androids turn-by-turn guidance can be a nightmare (I speak from experience) because it depends on the networkmeaning the map you need may be slow to load OR navigation may simply drop out in certain spots. It also fights with phone calls in hilarious (and obnoxious) ways. Android doesnt seem to handle multiple audio apps at once as well as iOS.

Yes, its free. But I got Navigon MyRegion for $15 (often $25), which is practically free, and FAR better than Google directions. All your data is on the device, and no network needed! And it multitasks with other audio (phone calls, Pandora) really well: your music fade a bit, the voice speaks, and the music comes back. You can even multitask more than one GPS at at once on iPhone: I sometimes run Navigon in the background for voice guidance, while keeping Google Earth on the screen for the cool 3D view of my surroundings. Best of both worlds!

Now, I do think Googles voice guidance is very cool, and it would be neat to have it pre-installed by default. But I consider it only a minor feature: Navigon is well worth $25 and the storage space, and a feature that lets me avoid Navigon isnt much temptation.

(There are other GPS apps of course, but I know and love Navigon.)
post #18 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

What does Google's 3D stuff do for me? I haven't used it, so maybe I'm missing something, but it looks like it adds visual clutter without enhancing my ability to get around. It's not like I'm flying 100 off the ground so that 3D views of the surrounding buildings from that height help orient me.

People often say it's "cool", but is it helpful in any way beyond eye candy?

I can actually see Google's 3D and Apple's proposed "schematic" maps as being points of divergence between the two companies' approach to mapping. For Google, more info is always better, and they like to show off what their engineers can accomplish. I can see Google's Android maps becoming ever more cluttered, with an ever more complex interface to handle all the possible options (Google X-Ray view! Google avatar chat view! Google material composition analysis view!).

Whereas it strikes me as quintessentially Apple to think a while about what people actually typically want maps for and make that as clean and accessible as possible. And, of course, the Android faithful will glance up format their pulsating, morphing, data encrusted maps and declare Apple's approach to be "boring" and "dated."

I don't see 3D view on Google Maps app as main reason why its so popular. Face it, had you seen these innovations coming from iOS side, you wouldn't be making an issue of it.

Google Street View on Android is definitely an enhancement that I personally use. Its literally impossible to get lost.

Another great feature would be Google's ability to process traffic analytics onto their app. I love the fact that I can just create a shortcut on my homescreen and it tells me how much traffic there is from my current location, to the destination location I saved it as.

I'm really waiting on Apple to deliver a native in-house navigation application that is fully integrated into iOS. All this talk of 'Jobs doesn't want to get in the way of 3rd party navigation developers' is pure balogney. If Apple has a compelling application that makes things easier for the end user, they'd do it in a heartbeat.
post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

What does Google's 3D stuff do for me? I haven't used it, so maybe I'm missing something, but it looks like it adds visual clutter without enhancing my ability to get around. It's not like I'm flying 100 off the ground so that 3D views of the surrounding buildings from that height help orient me.

People often say it's "cool", but is it helpful in any way beyond eye candy?

I can actually see Google's 3D and Apple's proposed "schematic" maps as being points of divergence between the two companies' approach to mapping. For Google, more info is always better, and they like to show off what their engineers can accomplish. I can see Google's Android maps becoming ever more cluttered, with an ever more complex interface to handle all the possible options (Google X-Ray view! Google avatar chat view! Google material composition analysis view!).

Whereas it strikes me as quintessentially Apple to think a while about what people actually typically want maps for and make that as clean and accessible as possible. And, of course, the Android faithful will glance up format their pulsating, morphing, data encrusted maps and declare Apple's approach to be "boring" and "dated."

I can see a little utility to it. For instance if you're in a city and see an 3D rendering of a large or unique structure before you see the street it could give you an idea of where to go. But as you state it's mostly just eye candy. It strikes me as being a lot like argument that Windows Flip 3D was better than Apple's Exposé simply because it was more showy even though it obfuscated a good deal of the data by using angled windows sitting atop each other.
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post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcarling View Post

The one change that I would like to see in Apple's Maps app is a much, much larger data cache. The programmers seem to have made two assumptions:
1. that all users would always have a data connection to the Internet everywhere they went, and
2. that only a some KBs of storage would be available for caching map data.

Both of these assumptions are wrong and result in very limited usability of the app. At least an order of magnitude increase in cached map data is required to make the app generally usable.

This is a great point. I've often used my iPhone as a GPS/mapping device on cycle tours/hikes in areas where cellphone reception is patchy. It's pretty annoying when the GPS can plot me on a blank grey screen because the maps themselves aren't cached...

I generally try to cache as much as I can of the area I am planning to traverse in the Maps app by panning around while I have reception, but it's never clear whether it is going to be enough...
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post #21 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Androids turn-by-turn guidance can be a nightmare (I speak from experience) because it depends on the networkmeaning the map you need may be slow to load OR navigation may simply drop out in certain spots. It also fights with phone calls in hilarious (and obnoxious) ways. Android doesnt seem to handle multiple audio apps at once as well as iOS.

Yes, its free. But I got Navigon MyRegion for $15 (often $25), which is practically free, and FAR better than Google directions. All your data is on the device, and no network needed! And it multitasks with other audio (phone calls, Pandora) really well: your music fade a bit, the voice speaks, and the music comes back. You can even multitask more than one GPS at at once on iPhone: I sometimes run Navigon in the background for voice guidance, while keeping Google Earth on the screen for the cool 3D view of my surroundings. Best of both worlds!

Now, I do think Googles voice guidance is very cool, and it would be neat to have it pre-installed by default. But I consider it only a minor feature: Navigon is well worth $25 and the storage space, and a feature that lets me avoid Navigon isnt much temptation.

(There are other GPS apps of course, but I know and love Navigon.)

Damn, just checked prices for Navigon in Australia - $74.99... no chance at that price.
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post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanl View Post

Could we have one article without bitterness? Please? Maybe some more Apple is cool stuff, without mentioning anyone else? Pretty Please?

Seems you're taking issue with the assertion that Google has driven map navigation competitors out of their app store, which you can claim is either true or false, but hardly 'bitter'.
Sounds more like you're being a bit defensive.
Fact is that Daniel was unusually complementary to Google features in this article.

And how do you review a product based on a Google web service without mentioning Google?
post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

What does Google's 3D stuff do for me? I haven't used it, so maybe I'm missing something, but it looks like it adds visual clutter without enhancing my ability to get around. It's not like I'm flying 100 off the ground so that 3D views of the surrounding buildings from that height help orient me.


Well put.
post #24 of 46
Coming up on 2012 and this is what they change to maps? Really?

at least it's better than the WP7 alternative, but still... really old tech. 3D turn by turn with voice navigation was standard on android in late 09

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post #25 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Check out Wayz.

It's actually spelled Waze. And yeah, couldn't believe it either. Free turn-by-turn? Plus text-to-voice? Sign me up!
post #26 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Others have already studied what Apple has implied they've uniquely discovered with their schematic maps. Think this creation from last year, LineDrive Maps, might be eerily similar to Apple's idea?

http://www.gpsreview.net/line-drive-maps/

Ah... the obligatory "Apple never created anything" meme.
Go rent James Burke's 'Connections' and then talk to me about the nature of originality, creativity and innovation.
EVERYTHING is built on what comes before. Innovation is combining existing things in a way that really takes over.
No doubt many have thought of presenting maps in as simple a form as possible.
Apple combines that with availability on an 'always with you' device, as opposed to the long list of clunky hardware add-ons listed in the link you provide.
post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

Androids turn-by-turn guidance can be a nightmare (I speak from experience) because it depends on the networkmeaning the map you need may be slow to load OR navigation may simply drop out in certain spots. It also fights with phone calls in hilarious (and obnoxious) ways. Android doesnt seem to handle multiple audio apps at once as well as iOS.

Yes, its free. But I got Navigon MyRegion for $15 (often $25), which is practically free, and FAR better than Google directions. All your data is on the device, and no network needed! And it multitasks with other audio (phone calls, Pandora) really well: your music fade a bit, the voice speaks, and the music comes back. You can even multitask more than one GPS at at once on iPhone: I sometimes run Navigon in the background for voice guidance, while keeping Google Earth on the screen for the cool 3D view of my surroundings. Best of both worlds!

Now, I do think Googles voice guidance is very cool, and it would be neat to have it pre-installed by default. But I consider it only a minor feature: Navigon is well worth $25 and the storage space, and a feature that lets me avoid Navigon isnt much temptation.

(There are other GPS apps of course, but I know and love Navigon.)

How are you able to justify paying $25 for app just to replace a system app you already have? The point is that Apple should already have had this implemented. Years ago. I don't think users should have to pay $25 to get a half featured maps application.

As for the google maps experience on an android platform, it can handle any audio application (music, google music beta, pandora, etc) while working with the maps application. When your next turn is announced, the volume in your 3rd party apps gets decreased so you can hear the direction.

Obviously it does depend on your network. If there's no service in your area, then maps will not be able to render images. The iphone suffers from the same problem because it has a limited cache. But the google maps application will also give you the directions (minus the 3d navigation) for when you lose service.

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post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaroonMushroom View Post

How are you able to justify paying $25 for app just to replace a system app you already have? The point is that Apple should already have had this implemented. Years ago. I don't think users should have to pay $25 to get a half featured maps application.

As for the google maps experience on an android platform, it can handle any audio application (music, google music beta, pandora, etc) while working with the maps application. When your next turn is announced, the volume in your 3rd party apps gets decreased so you can hear the direction.

Obviously it does depend on your network. If there's no service in your area, then maps will not be able to render images. The iphone suffers from the same problem because it has a limited cache. But the google maps application will also give you the directions (minus the 3d navigation) for when you lose service.

+1 on this

additionally, Google recently updated their Maps application so that you can cache your maps offline. A huge bonus, especially say, if you're hiking, and you don't get 3G signal, yet you still get GPS.
post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by droideggs View Post

+1 on this

additionally, Google recently updated their Maps application so that you can cache your maps offline. A huge bonus, especially say, if you're hiking, and you don't get 3G signal, yet you still get GPS.

Well damn, even better.

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post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

newest version in iOS 5 ads the ability

and approximate driving times. after selecting a route

ads = advertisements
adds = in addition to

after - Sentences start with capital letters

Is anyone proofreading?
post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Ah... the obligatory "Apple never created anything" meme.
Go rent James Burke's 'Connections' and then talk to me about the nature of originality, creativity and innovation.
EVERYTHING is built on what comes before. Innovation is combining existing things in a way that really takes over.
No doubt many have thought of presenting maps in as simple a form as possible.
Apple combines that with availability on an 'always with you' device, as opposed to the long list of clunky hardware add-ons listed in the link you provide.

Not at all. Recognizing that Apple might not have "invented" this is not the same as saying Apple never invented anything at all. Thanks for playing False Premises tho.
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post #32 of 46
Not always so easy….

I have had a lot of trouble when using it to do a "get there from here" option. It seems impossible to do sometimes. It is one thing if you start with "From here" but if you are cruising through the maps and trying several options, it can be infuriatingly difficult to figure out- especially if you are in a car trying to drive while another is trying to navigate who is not very good with it at all.

Real PAIN!

Maybe there really is an easy way to do this - but sure not obvious.
post #33 of 46
That was a long a** article!
post #34 of 46
I've used TomTom and Navigon iPhone apps. Both have it's strengths and weaknesses. I currently have TomTom installed and love it. $25? $40? It's definitely worth it to me. It's actually better than my TomTom standalone GPS.

Just think of internet connected standalone GPS... it's actually better than that on my iPhone 4. My iPhone 4's GPS gets better signal than the standalones.
post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by ameldrum1 View Post

Damn, just checked prices for Navigon in Australia - $74.99... no chance at that price.

Even at $75 (I got it when it was more expensive).. really?

Let us know how you go after blowing several hundred on a standalone unit, with the stubbornly non-responsive resistive touch screen and when you need to pay for the next map update.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevesabol View Post

I haven't found an iOS turn-by-turn solution that doesn't suck (in my, admittedly, limited search). I've found them hard to use with a cluttered interface. I also haven't liked the iPod integration but that may be a limitation of the iOS APIs.

Any recommendations?

Navigon is the best in my opinion. Have been using it for a while along with TomTom (and their car dock) and I have to say that Navigon gives better direction in chicago area. Not sure about other parts of the country, but from personal experience would recommend Navigon over TomTom.
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post #37 of 46
So do we know who bought C3 Technologies yes?
post #38 of 46
Apple and Google are competitors now. In business, lining a competitor's pockets is never a good thing. When it comes to components, Apple has no choice but to partner up with Samsung, LG, Sharp, and others. The good thing when it comes to component suppliers is that components manufacturing and product design are separate business units. But that's not the case with Google.

Right now, Google has the opportunity to data-mine information off of iOS users and earn revenue off of iOS. Apple should completely get away from Google's services and end their reliance on Google.
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by vvswarup View Post

Apple and Google are competitors now. In business, lining a competitor's pockets is never a good thing. When it comes to components, Apple has no choice but to partner up with Samsung, LG, Sharp, and others. The good thing when it comes to component suppliers is that components manufacturing and product design are separate business units. But that's not the case with Google.

Right now, Google has the opportunity to data-mine information off of iOS users and earn revenue off of iOS. Apple should completely get away from Google's services and end their reliance on Google.

You know I just thought about something related today. There is really no apple services on Google's devices. No itunes, no iBooks, no iAds, no iCloud. On the flip side, it seems impossible for apple to ship a device without any google services.

Google search is too good to change to something else. Apple hasn't shipped a maps alternative to google's back end yet and we don't know if it ever will (think street view and transit directions those are hard to replicate on scale of google).

On a more personal level I love gmail and google calendar and google docs. While I view that info natively through corresponding apple apps I just don't see any real alternative that would be as good as google. Perhaps with iCloud it would be a bit easier, but still remains to be seen.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanl View Post

Could we have one article without bitterness? Please? Maybe some more Apple is cool stuff, without mentioning anyone else? Pretty Please?

I don't think it really is bitter. The article does mention the advantages Google's Maps App has over Apple's own. That is relatively unbiased reporting.

I want it all ... the 3D view and turn-by-turn that Android has and the schemantic view that Apple is trying to patent. And I want it on an iPhone!
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