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Apple may add DisplayPort to its new mobile chips for iOS devices

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Apple has posted a new job listing for a signal integrity and power integrity manager to join its team that builds custom chips for use in future mobile products, asking for experience in working with interface standards including DisplayPort.

The job listing, discovered by AppleInsider, describes the position as working within the "group at Apple that develops SOCs that will be used in Apple mobile devices," referring to the "system on a chip" devices designed by Apple and currently built by Samsung, including the A4 used inside iPhone 4 and the A5 powering the iPad 2.

A signal integrity engineer manages issues with sending electrical signals through chips, circuit boards, and interconnects between devices, preventing crosstalk, signal attenuation and power supply noise from overpowering data signals.

Apple asks for SI experience in working with both serial and parallel data links, naming DisplayPort (a digital serial link for video that the company currently uses only on its Mac desktops and notebooks) and LPDDR2 (a parallel data bus used by the type of fast RAM used inside the iPad 2's A5 chip).

This indicates that Apple is likely working to add support for the DisplayPort video standard to upcoming versions of its SOC, perhaps as soon as the delivery of the upcoming A6.



Apple currently only supports the older, analog composite VGA and digital parallel HDMI video standards for output from the iPhone 4, iPad and iPad 2. Adding the modern new digital serial DisplayPort link would enable future iOS devices to drive the new crop of displays that are beginning to appear, including Apple's own new Thunderbolt Display.

Thunderbolt, external displays and video input

There's no evidence to suggest that Apple will also incorporate SOC support for Thunderbolt's separate high speed data interconnect features, which the company added to its Mini DisplayPort jacks on new Macs released this year.

Thunderbolt pairs a direct, high speed link to the CPU (based on Intel's PCI Express standard) on the same cable as DisplayPort video, allowing modern Macs that support the new interconnect to drive one or more external displays while also connecting to high speed external storage devices and supporting bridge connections to alternative interfaces such as USB 2.0, Firewire, and Gigabit Ethernet.

However, the addition of DisplayPort support for iOS devices could make it easier to link future mobile devices to modern displays, as well as extend support for the bidirectional video feature in the latest versions of the video standard, making it possible to use an iPad as an external display for a MacBook Air, for example.

Currently, only the 27 inch iMac's DisplayPort supports the use of the system as an external display. Adding such a feature to iPads, particularly new ones with ultra high resolution displays, would add value to the product among mobile users and creative professionals.
post #2 of 30
Yes!

Thunderbolt on an iPad!

Place to stand --- meet lever!
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post #3 of 30
Using the ipad as an external display for the macbook air? What a retarded idea. Why didn't I think of that? Oh yeah...I'm not RETARDED.
post #4 of 30
Everyone thought it was the mute switch moving to the other side, but it's a mini-display port.



http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...ved_sides.html
post #5 of 30
...this is how both the VGA and HDMI dongles work; there are two displayport lanes on the dock connector which then get converted to either VGA or HDMI.

You can see mention of this on some of the 3rd party dongles, eg:

http://www.buy.com/prod/wolverine-ip...217655377.html

...or if you tear apart a VGA dongle you can see the displayport->vga chip (some ST part) pretty clearly.
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuzmanEva58716752 View Post

I just paid $24,31 for an iPad2-64GB and my girlfriend loves her Panasonic GF 1 Camera that we got for $34,26 there arriving tomorrow by UPS. I will never pay such expensive retail prices in stores again. Especially when I also sold a 42 inch LED TV to my boss for $678 which only cost me $68,18 to buy. Here is the website we use to get it all from, CentSpace.com

This account will be deleted in 4,3,2....

EDIT: MOD - delete my post as well, so his msg is not saved here.
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2011 13" 2.3 MBP, 2006 15" 2.16 MBP, iPhone 4, iPod Shuffle, AEBS, AppleTV2 with XBMC.
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post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

This account will be deleted in 4,3,2....

EDIT: MOD - delete my post as well, so his msg is not saved here.

No ..I want to leave the dead carcass of this spammer at least partially visible.

He's a mod so he has a few extra vBulletin privileges. That doesn't mean he should stop posting or should start acting like Digital Jesus.
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post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by regan View Post

Using the ipad as an external display for the macbook air? What a retarded idea. Why didn't I think of that? Oh yeah...I'm not RETARDED.

Er... Ah... How about an iPad as an external display, multitouch control surface, graphics tablet, customizable input device (switches, buttons, keys, fretboards, sliders, knobs, etc.)...

For any Mac with Thunderbolt!
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post #9 of 30
Really Apple has been on an engineering hiring blitz for sometime. As for these specialties, the world is quickly transitioning to whole systems on a chip communicating with the outside world via serial lanes. The fact of the matter is Apple already has a thin lead here. However I expect that Apple will maintain that lead by a diversacation of it's custom chip line up. Expect to see far more custom hardware out there.
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Yes!

Thunderbolt on an iPad!

Place to stand --- meet lever!

Ummm, didn't this article just specifically say NOT to expect Thunderbolt on iOS devices?
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post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by regan View Post

Using the ipad as an external display for the macbook air? What a retarded idea. Why didn't I think of that? Oh yeah...I'm not RETARDED.

Actually I'd imagine on devices with relatively small displays like MacBook Airs lots of folks would like to extend their desktops (when actually seated at a desk) via an external monitor (which could be an iPad).
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post #12 of 30
I think people are missing the obvious.

Apple is moving the Mac platform from Intel to the ARM architecture found in the A6.

All signs are pointing this way.

The Mac OS user interface is moving towards iOS.

When the Mac does move to ARM, you will only be able to run software purchased from one of Apple's App Stores.

It will be a blessing for consumers. No more worrying about viruses or backups. If you manage to get a virus (unlikely as the Mac will only run signed code) or have disk corruption, just erase the hard drive and restore from iCloud. iCloud stores all your data, and you can just re-download the OS and your Apps. The only people with problems will be those who have 'jail broken' their Macs in order to run unapproved software.


This is likely the real reason why Rosetta is not present in Lion. Apple didn't want the loss of PPC software to be associated with the move to the ARM architecture. Therefore, they needed to discontinue Rosetta prematurely, so it's loss is not seen as related to the ARM transition.
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfryd View Post

I think people are missing the obvious.

Apple is moving the Mac platform from Intel to the ARM architecture found in the A6.

Oh, HOW could we have missed that? It's so GLARINGLY obvious

Quote:
All signs are pointing this way.

I'm a great driver. I've not seen a single sign.

Quote:
The Mac OS user interface is moving towards iOS.

Which to you apparently implies good hardware will move to crap hardware.

Quote:
When the Mac does move to ARM, you will only be able to run software purchased from one of Apple's App Stores.

Fear. Uncertainty. Doubt.

Quote:
'jail broken' their Macs



Quote:
This is likely the real reason why Rosetta is not present in Lion.

Or maybe it's just old code for a six year old, dead platform that no one should be writing anymore.

But no, your idea's "valid".

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Oh, HOW could we have missed that? It's so GLARINGLY obvious



I'm a great driver. I've not seen a single sign.



Which to you apparently implies good hardware will move to crap hardware.



Fear. Uncertainty. Doubt.







Or maybe it's just old code for a six year old, dead platform that no one should be writing anymore.

But no, your idea's "valid".

Thank you for your well thought out critique. It's always nice to see a well thought out and reasoned response rather than a personal attack.

You seem to be under the impression that there is somehow something "bad" about Apple taking this path. Quite the contrary, it makes excellent business sense.

Apple has clearly made the business decision to go after the vast consumer market, and has shown little loyalty to their existing customers. The number of consumers out there vastly outweigh the business market.

Already the consumer iPads make more money for Apple than the Mac product line. Apple's main income are from iOS devices, iPhones, iPads, iPod Touch. The Mac market maybe growing at about 14% per year, but the iPhone and iPad markets are growing at 140% to 180% per year. Each year the Mac makes up a smaller percentage of Apple's income.

Turning the Mac into a desktop iPad makes a lot of sense. Most people are not computer experts. They don't understand what happens under the hood, nor do they want to. An iOS Mac would be perfect for this market segment. You get the large screen and keyboard of a desktop, with the simplicity and ease of use for the iPad. Lion already has features that only work when you use the trackpad. I suspect Mouse support will be going away soon as well.

Today's Mac is built on Unix. I'm a power user, as are most people who are reading this. I am happy that I can drop into Terminal at any time and access the command line. I'm old school and I am comfortable editing large text files in emacs, without ever touching a mouse. My mother-in-law has no concept of what a command line, nor what it's for. She has no desire to learn.

The mother-in-laws of this world far outnumber us.


In any case Apple has a long history of aggressively abandoning old technology and embracing the new.

If you sync via mobile-me, it will stop working next June, unless you upgrade to Lion.

If you don't have broadband, you are a second class citizen when it comes to buying Lion.

If you don't have broadband you cannot buy most Apple software as it is only available online.

Apple no longer supports the Apple modem under Lion.

Apple even went as far as adding code to prevent AirPlay audio streaming from working with the original Apple TV (AirPlay audio streaming does work with the original Airport Express, which uses the same protocols as the original Apple TV).


I'm not saying this is good or bad. I'm just suggesting that in my opinion it's far more likely that Apple will move the Mac to ARM then for Apple to add Thunderbolt to the iPhone or iPad.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfryd View Post

Turning the Mac into a desktop iPad makes a lot of sense. Most people are not computer experts. They don't understand what happens under the hood, nor do they want to.

Absolutely correct, which is why Lion works and looks like iOS.

Quote:
An iOS Mac would be perfect for this market segment.

Except one not running iOS.

Quote:
I'm not saying this is good or bad. I'm just suggesting that in my opinion it's far more likely that Apple will move the Mac to ARM then for Apple to add Thunderbolt to the iPhone or iPad.

But you've provided no logical… ANYTHING… for the move to ARM. If what's under the hood doesn't matter to most people, then Apple's going to keep around stuff that DOES matter to the PEOPLE who DO (matter). People who need more than ARM can provide and people who don't want to use touchscreens for their work.

Their work being developing applications to run on these computers of the future. Because they matter more than any mother-in-law.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #16 of 30
If they only support the Apple display standard and drop USB, you won't be able to hook your iPhone or iPad up to a PC ... but who needs to once you sync over the air. But it can now drive a monitor.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Absolutely correct, which is why Lion works and looks like iOS.



Except one not running iOS.



But you've provided no logical ANYTHING for the move to ARM. If what's under the hood doesn't matter to most people, then Apple's going to keep around stuff that DOES matter to the PEOPLE who DO (matter). People who need more than ARM can provide and people who don't want to use touchscreens for their work.

Their work being developing applications to run on these computers of the future. Because they matter more than any mother-in-law.

Apple now has in-house people designing ARM processors.

Apple has been moving to control as much of the eco-system as possible.

Apple moved away from the PPC architecture because the developers of PPC were not interested in making processors that met Apple's needs.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Apple recently threatened gave Intel a wakeup call that they would be losing Apple's business if they couldn't reduce power consumption.

The ARM chip is already a low power, high performance chip. Apple is in control of their processor designs. Moving towards ARM seems a natural move for Apple.

both iOS and Mac OSX are based on the same code base. Apple makes much more money from ARM based sales then intel based sales. If Apple moves the Mac to ARM, they no longer have to worry about optimizing for Intel. By focusing all of their development on a single platform, they will be better able to use their development resources.


But I could be wrong. it's possible that Apple is very concerned about existing customers (despite what the Final Cut Pro users think). Companies that are concerned about existing customers generally produce a road map showing where they are going, and giving time frames for the discontinuation of existing technologies.

A company that was concerned about existing customers would have made an official announcement that Rosetta was going away. Customers would not have to rely on notoriously inaccurate rumor sites (apologies to AppleInside). As it is, the only official notice of Rosettas demise is a warning that pops up after you have upgraded, telling you that your existing software is no longer supported.
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfryd View Post

Moving towards ARM seems a natural move for Apple.

Completely removing the video editing, audio editing, and high-end graphics design parts of Apple's market, however, doesn't.

Quote:
If Apple moves the Mac to ARM, they no longer have to worry about optimizing for Intel.

Or worry about having any third-party developers make software for OS X, either.

Quote:
A company that was concerned about existing customers would have made an official announcement that Rosetta was going away.

They did. To the developers. Who are the ones that matter. It could have easily been a footnote on the Lion page, but it isn't.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #19 of 30
What appears to make sense functionally (at least to me) is to run both iOS/ARM and OSX/Intel on a single Mac... desktop, laptop whatever:

-- lower power/battery power usage
-- instant on/off
-- immediate access via iOS/ARM to most-often-used functions: web, email, notifications, synch, iCloud, streaming, chat, widgets...
-- the OSX/Intel to do heavy lifting: more robust apps, Windows, encoding, transcoding, rendering, multi-window, development, simulation...

I would think you could walk up to your Mac and get immediate access to iPad-like computer capabilities without ever getting into OSX/Intel mode.


Then, when you need more power or capability, the OSX/Intel takes over and does the heavy lifting.


But, the ARM/iOS could keep on running -- handling sync, backup, notifications, iCloud -- offloading those background tasks from the "power" components.


In the old days of maimframe computers they used the concept of channels to offload the more mundane (I/O) functions from the main processor.

These "channels" were little computers in themselves -- with their own little OS (limited function). The channels and the processors ran concurrently and interfaced using designated areas of memory as a buffer or dropbox.


From a cost standpoint an inexpensive A4 ARM chip could off-lay the busy and inefficient work of UI and IO from the big iron and big OS -- allowing each to do their own thing and deliver the best results for the user,

...kinda' like Kobe and Shaq when they both played for the Lakers team.
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post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Completely removing the video editing, audio editing, and high-end graphics design parts of Apple's market, however, doesn't.



Or worry about having any third-party developers make software for OS X, either.



They did. To the developers. Who are the ones that matter. It could have easily been a footnote on the Lion page, but it isn't.

High end video editing, audio editing, and high-end graphics design are only a small portion of the Mac market. The Mac market is only a small portion of Apple's revenue. If Apple abandoned these markets tomorrow, it would not make a noticeable difference on their bottom line.

There's an argument to be made that Apple has already shown it is not interested in the professional video editing program.

Apple did not upgrade FCP, they replaced it. It's quite possible that the new FCP may in fact be a better program than the old, but it is clear that it is not compatible, and it is currently missing features that today's vide professionals need. Apple discontinued the old program when they introduced the new, and even went as far as recalling boxed copies of the old program from store shelves. Any professional working on a large FCP pro project was left in a situation where they could not add more bodies to the project because they could not buy additional copies of the old version and the new version doesn't open old projects.

The FCP project manager is on record s saying that some of the features of the old version will not be added to the new version, because Apple doesn't think people should be using video tape.

This is not how a company would act if they were interested in the professional video market.

Keep in mind that iMovie is already available on the iPad. It's very likely that the new version of FCP was developed with Apple's latest frameworks and development environment. I suspect that FCP will be available for the iPad 4, if not the iPad 3.
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfryd View Post

High end video editing, audio editing, and high-end graphics design are only a small portion of the Mac market. The Mac market is only a small portion of Apple's revenue. If Apple abandoned these markets tomorrow, it would not make a noticeable difference on their bottom line.

You just keep thinking that.

Quote:
This is not how a company would act if they were interested in the professional video market.

It's the exact same thing Apple did with phones. Completely new device, zero compatibility with old ringtone files, contact files, etc.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You just keep thinking that.



It's the exact same thing Apple did with phones. Completely new device, zero compatibility with old ringtone files, contact files, etc.

Don't take my word for it, take a look at Apple's financials.

Apple is not a computer company. It is the number one smart phone manufacturer in the world. It is primarily a Phone company and a tablet company. The Mac portion of Apple's revenue is rapidly decreasing.

If you think otherwise, you haven't looked at their latest reports.


As to phones, it's not quite the same. The iPhone is compatible with iPod music and video. Also, Apple didn't have a previous phone they wanted to be compatible with.
post #23 of 30
mfryd vs Tallest Skil: Someone on the internet is wrong?

One thing people can be sure about is that Apple is unlikely to say for certain that they are switching from x86 to ARM until/if they actually do it. There may be rumours and indeed many signs do point that way, but until iSteve says "Oh, and one more thing; this was using ARM all along...." we just don't know.

However x86 is very yester-decade technology. It is extremely power hungry and intel have utterly failed to compete with ARM thus far on a performance per watt category. Even at the high end, many of the world's top ten super computers are all GPGPU based; and the x86 chips are just there to marshall the GPUs and pass data between them.

Large amounts of programming effort these days goes in to speeding up and solving embarrassingly parallell problems. For that, x86 has nothing against the GPU markets which, powered by the huge gaming industry, have developed state of the art hardware to do just that.

Many companies (again like Nvidia) are looking seriously at ARM for cpus (final evolution of GPGPU); e.g. their announced `project denver' so as to do the house keeping for their GPU; since x86 is an overkill for this (especially TDP-wise).


Anyway, should Apple switch to ARM?
  • Given Apple's propensity for small and shiny; ARM makes far more sense than x86.
  • Given Apple's propensity for wanting complete control, ARM makes far more sense than x86.
  • Given Apple's propensity for not wanting to pay more than they have to, ARM's combined cost of licensing and royalties are almost certainly lower.
  • Given even in the high end and server area, the propensity for massive parallelism of small simple cores that can be turned off completely when not used (unlike most intel cpus which take up more power in stand-by mode than many arm cores running full speed), again, ARM or at least GPU is the way to go, not x86.
  • Looking at market caps, Apple could buy ARM for pocket change if it were that way inclined. Although it is debatable as to whether ARM would hold value if no longer independent.

The reason Intel are trying to make inroads in to ARM's mobile space recently (apart from it being a massively bigger market; ARM `ships' (well, it's licensees anyway), what[?], 1Bn chips a quarter these days[?] (think about it, that's 4bn a year, i.e. over 120 a second [!])) is because they know that if ARM can push up in to the desktop/server market, they are in deep trouble. Apple probably would jump; and Microsoft have announced and even demoed Windows (and Office) for ARM.


So... why would Apple stay with x86, when they could make ARM based laptops with far longer battery life? To appease current desktop users, and their developers? We know Apple isn't terribly bothered about that; and they've managed several architecture transitions in the past.

Will it happen next year? No way. Well, just maybe in the AIR, but I doubt it otherwise. Will we see x86/ARM hybrids? Maybe; there have been a few windows/linux based ones already; and I doubt iSteve would find those `Apple' enough.

Apple like tiny, shiny, and blimey, look, at that battery life...

Will Apple transition over (say) the next five years? Who knows; but if I were a betting person; I'd have money on it.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisatosAngel View Post

mfryd vs Tallest Skil: Someone on the internet is wrong?

Eh, you're thinking of cloudgazer. Think me but posting more and on more varied topics. And he's a touch nicer about it.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfryd View Post

Don't take my word for it, take a look at Apple's financials.

Apple is not a computer company. It is the number one smart phone manufacturer in the world. It is primarily a Phone company and a tablet company. The Mac portion of Apple's revenue is rapidly decreasing.

If you think otherwise, you haven't looked at their latest reports.


As to phones, it's not quite the same. The iPhone is compatible with iPod music and video. Also, Apple didn't have a previous phone they wanted to be compatible with.

Much of what you say is valid...

Except, the entire iDevice ecosystem and much of the infrastructure depends upon computers -- Macs and PCs.

Until this changes, Apple will not be able to abandon the pc as we know it.

Also, I disagree that Apple is not interested in the high-end video post production -- rather they have revisualized the needs of the industry for the next 10-20 years -- then have redesigned/repurposed their apps to address those needs. That was the same thing Apple did a decade ago with FCP 1.0.

BTW, I just got a maxed-out iMac 27. FC7 shows a minor improvement -- FCPX runs circles around it -- and does things that are just not possible without a ground-up rethink and reimplementation. And, that'ls not just exploiting 64-bit, RAM/CPU/GPU.
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post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfryd View Post

I think people are missing the obvious.

Apple is moving the Mac platform from Intel to the ARM architecture found in the A6.

All signs are pointing this way.

The Mac OS user interface is moving towards iOS.

When the Mac does move to ARM, you will only be able to run software purchased from one of Apple's App Stores.

It will be a blessing for consumers. No more worrying about viruses or backups. If you manage to get a virus (unlikely as the Mac will only run signed code) or have disk corruption, just erase the hard drive and restore from iCloud. iCloud stores all your data, and you can just re-download the OS and your Apps. The only people with problems will be those who have 'jail broken' their Macs in order to run unapproved software.


This is likely the real reason why Rosetta is not present in Lion. Apple didn't want the loss of PPC software to be associated with the move to the ARM architecture. Therefore, they needed to discontinue Rosetta prematurely, so it's loss is not seen as related to the ARM transition.


Actually it's more likely that Apple is making room for the inevitable ARM cores that are suitable for Netbook class notebooks. While the Mac OS will share common interface elements both the Mobile platforms and Desktop (if you will) platforms will keep their distinctive difference.

iOS -

Touch Input
Full Screen apps
Little legacy software


Mac OS

KB/Mouse input
Windowed GUI
Legacy software

Talk of merging the two OS is interesting but fruitless as this would mean Apple's employing the same strategy that Microsoft is which is trying to cram the same OS across mobile and desktop platforms.

Mac apps will always be available from multiple sources . Apple isn't looking to reduce choice. If more of the Mac OS hits ARM processing developers will simply target ARM within Xcode using LLVM and compile their app that way. There's no need for unified store for Mac OS based devices.
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post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Much of what you say is valid...

Except, the entire iDevice ecosystem and much of the infrastructure depends upon computers -- Macs and PCs.

Until this changes, Apple will not be able to abandon the pc as we know it.

Also, I disagree that Apple is not interested in the high-end video post production -- rather they have revisualized the needs of the industry for the next 10-20 years -- then have redesigned/repurposed their apps to address those needs. That was the same thing Apple did a decade ago with FCP 1.0.

BTW, I just got a maxed-out iMac 27. FC7 shows a minor improvement -- FCPX runs circles around it -- and does things that are just not possible without a ground-up rethink and reimplementation. And, that'ls not just exploiting 64-bit, RAM/CPU/GPU.



The iDevice ecosystem currently depends upon traditional computers. That changes once iCloud is up and running. Your data is stored in Apple's cloud. Applications, music, video and software updates all come directly from the cloud. Once iOS 5 is released, Apple no longer needs computers.


As to FCPX being better than FCP, that isn't the point. The point is that professionals need an orderly transition. Professionals need to plan, they need a road map of what's coming. The abrupt and unexpected nature of the transition that Apple chose indicates that they are not concerned with professionals.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Actually it's more likely that Apple is making room for the inevitable ARM cores that are suitable for Netbook class notebooks. While the Mac OS will share common interface elements both the Mobile platforms and Desktop (if you will) platforms will keep their distinctive difference.

iOS -

Touch Input
Full Screen apps
Little legacy software


Mac OS

KB/Mouse input
Windowed GUI
Legacy software

Talk of merging the two OS is interesting but fruitless as this would mean Apple's employing the same strategy that Microsoft is which is trying to cram the same OS across mobile and desktop platforms.

Mac apps will always be available from multiple sources . Apple isn't looking to reduce choice. If more of the Mac OS hits ARM processing developers will simply target ARM within Xcode using LLVM and compile their app that way. There's no need for unified store for Mac OS based devices.


You have listed a Mouse under Mac OS. Lion already has features that are trackpad only. A mouse is not necessary, and a multi touch Trackpad is strongly recommended. Do you see Apple reversing direction and going back to mice?


As to Apple not looking to reduce choice, we clearly have different views. If Apple was in favor of choice, they would not be adverse to jail breaking. If Apple liked choice, Lion would allow one to choose between the traditional Save on command model and Lion's new autosave. If Apple liked choice, then users would have the option of running old and outdated PPC software.

Let's not get into choices for hardware. Dell gives users choices, Apple has three models of desktop: Mac Mini iMac, and Mac Pro. If Apple liked giving people choices there would be a few more.

Now it may be true that Apple has limited the field to only those things that people really need, or really should have. But that's not giving people choice. When Apple decides that iOS is better than Mac OS, then Mac OS will go away.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfryd View Post

The iDevice ecosystem currently depends upon traditional computers. That changes once iCloud is up and running. Your data is stored in Apple's cloud. Applications, music, video and software updates all come directly from the cloud. Once iOS 5 is released, Apple no longer needs computers.


Not quite accurate! We have about 4TB of media content stored among 5 computers. Much of it is home movies and photos, songs ripped from CDs and LP, Video ripped from purchased VHS Tapes, DVDs. We have about 5% of our content of 10,000 songs and 1,000 movies that were purchased from iTunes, and can be served from iCloud.

Today, I use a Mac Mini with 4 LaCie 2 TB external drives to house content and backup on the main media library -- then each Mac user (5) has their own collection.

My 3 grandkids play soccer. with 6 practices and 3 games per week that introduces about 540 GB per week of new AVCHD content that must be stored and manipulated locally.

Just got a Promise Pegasas 12 TB RAID to repackage this more conveniently... iCloud solution, no way!


Quote:
As to FCPX being better than FCP, that isn't the point. The point is that professionals need an orderly transition. Professionals need to plan, they need a road map of what's coming. The abrupt and unexpected nature of the transition that Apple chose indicates that they are not concerned with professionals.


Professionals can (and will) bitch and moan about everything -- but they still can use what they have, FCP 7... It still works!

Many of these very same "establishment" pros of today are the ones who were able to get into the business because FCP 1.0 in 1990 cost about 1/150 of the then "establishment" NLE systems...

They took the risk without any road map or any assurance of follow-on product updates,
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Not quite accurate! We have about 4TB of media content stored among 5 computers. Much of it is home movies and photos, songs ripped from CDs and LP, Video ripped from purchased VHS Tapes, DVDs. We have about 5% of our content of 10,000 songs and 1,000 movies that were purchased from iTunes, and can be served from iCloud.

Today, I use a Mac Mini with 4 LaCie 2 TB external drives to house content and backup on the main media library -- then each Mac user (5) has their own collection.

My 3 grandkids play soccer. with 6 practices and 3 games per week that introduces about 540 GB per week of new AVCHD content that must be stored and manipulated locally.

Just got a Promise Pegasas 12 TB RAID to repackage this more conveniently... iCloud solution, no way!


[QUOTE}
As to FCPX being better than FCP, that isn't the point. The point is that professionals need an orderly transition. Professionals need to plan, they need a road map of what's coming. The abrupt and unexpected nature of the transition that Apple chose indicates that they are not concerned with professionals.

[/QUOTE]

Professionals can (and will) bitch and moan about everything -- but they still can use what they have, FCP 7... It still works!

Many of these very same "establishment" pros of today are the ones who were able to get into the business because FCP 1.0 in 1990 cost about 1/150 of the then "establishment" NLE systems...

They took the risk without any road map or any assurance of follow-on product updates,[/QUOTE]

Your music isn't an issue. Apple has already announced that if you have music you have ripped yourself, you will be able to access Apple's copy from iCloud. The music companies are probably on board because any music you get form Apple has your Apple ID embedded in it. If you redistribute those tracks, it's easy for the record companies to track you down as the source of the music.

As to Final Cut Pro still working, yes that much is true.

Yes, professionals do moan about a lot, and sometimes they have a point.

Any projects underway with FCP 7, can't be grown by adding new people.

When the next release of the OS breaks FCP 7, there will be no recourse.

The reason that Rosetta existed in the first place was that Apple needed to provide a transition strategy or risk losing their existing customer base. Apple has not provided a transition path for FCP 7 to FCP X because they don't need to keep the existing customer base.

Apple is running a business. They are making smart business decisions. They are focusing on profitable areas (like mass market consumers) and are abandoning small specialty markets (like video professionals).

It's a big win for mass market consumers, and a big loss for the small market that depended on Apple.


There is something wrong when the only full version of Quicken that runs on a new Mac requires Windows.

Yes, there are some people who don't fit Apple's iCloud model. These people are simply not in Apple's target market.
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