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Proposed Apple Store in Santa Monica features giant curved glass ceiling

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Apple is expected to propose a major new retail store in Santa Monica that would feature a large curved glass roof allowing the California sun to illuminate the shopping space.

The plans make no specific mention of Apple, referring only to "the applicant," but the designs clearly show the traditional minimalist layout of an Apple Store inside. The proposed building, first discovered by Curbed (via MacRumors), would be 8,084 square feet.

Located on the Third Street Promenade, the shop would replace an existing three-story building that was home to a Borders Bookstore. The 34-foot-high store would feature a transparent glass ceiling, allowing shoppers to see the sky above.

The illustrations for the project were revealed in a Santa Monica Planning Commission meeting agenda. That meeting is set to take place tonight.

The applicant for the project is listed as ASB/Blatteis Promenade Holdings, who purchased the property in September of 2010. The design for the project must receive approval from the city's Architectural Review Board.

The proposal also reveals the unnamed applicant will encourage its employees to use alternative transportation to get to work, offering a $100-per-month transit subsidy toward public transportation fares, as well as a $20-per-month bicycle reimbursement. Bicycle parking has also been proposed for inclusion at the facility's basement level.



The curved glass roof at the proposed store is similar to one already found at the Apple Store in New York's Upper West Side, which opened in 2009. That storefront is also taller, at 54 feet, versus the 34-foot height proposed in Santa Monica.



Curved glass is also a central component of Apple's so-called "spaceship" corporate headquarters, given that moniker because the proposed facility would have a massive circular shape. That structure, awaiting approval from the Cupertino, Calif., city council, would use curved glass all the way around its exterior.

"There's not a straight piece of glass in this building," Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs said in a presentation to the city council in June. "We've used our experience in building retail buildings all over the world. We know how to make the biggest pieces of glass for architectural use."
post #2 of 30
I wonder if they're going to have issues with heating and cooling with so much glass on top?
post #3 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Forbes View Post

I wonder if they're going to have issues with heating and cooling with so much glass on top?

Was thinking the exact same thing. I wonder what the AC bill would be.

Also is it really a good idea to have that much sunshine when most Apple displays are glossy?
post #4 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Forbes View Post

I wonder if they're going to have issues with heating and cooling with so much glass on top?

Cooling - possibly. Though having lived on the far west side, my first thought was "what California sun?" In my experience there's more "marine layer" than sun from June to August.

Heating? In SoCal? What's that?

In either event, good luck to them getting this through the Santa Monica bureaucracy in anything like a reasonable amount of time. I think it's a fine design, but the words "timely and efficient" and "Santa Monica approval" rarely appear in the same sentence. And Santa Monica's pretty protective of the Promenade.
post #5 of 30
I wonder how they're gonna deal with all that monitor glare when the sun shines through that glass.
They'll probably only order Macs with matte screens

Either way, that's gonna be a darn good look'n store!
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post #6 of 30
I'm surprised they'd build on this location. I've found the 3rd st mall in Santa Monica to be a tacky strip with really cheap shops (even since its 'revival'). Not the place I'd expect an Apple Store. Oh well.
post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

I'm surprised they'd build on this location. I've found the 3rd st mall in Santa Monica to be a tacky strip with really cheap shops (even since its 'revival'). Not the place I'd expect an Apple Store. Oh well.

There's already a smaller apple store in the promenade
post #8 of 30
The full spectrum of light will cause poor visibilty when we look at the computer displays or iPads. Dont do it. I like the current store layout.
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

Was thinking the exact same thing. I wonder what the AC bill would be.

Probably offset by the low lighting bill. Many windows is eco-friendly, especially good windows, which I'm sure this is.
post #10 of 30
All the glass and natural lighting make for a grand first impression - I loved first walking into the NYC upper westside store - but as soon as you walk up to a table you see how much of a design mistake it is. The glare it causes on iPads is actually quite significant. It's bad enough that it feels like they're trying to prove the Amazon Kindle ads are right.

Unless Apple is making this decision based on the fact that they know iPads and iPhones will not have glossy screens much longer.
post #11 of 30
Earthquake.

Crashing sound.

Death.
post #12 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

Was thinking the exact same thing. I wonder what the AC bill would be.

Probably pretty low.

In Santa Monica, average annual daily high is 66F, low is 56F, no humidity issues. The Pacific Ocean provides natural A/C and about three months of the year, you have a marine inversion layer to boot. Just ventilating the structure would probably be sufficient eight or nine months of the year with limited A/C use on the hottest days (mostly in August, September, October).

Prolonged heat spells on the Pacific coast are very rare. Usually after 2-3 days of heat, the marine layer will kick in.
post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Earthquake.

Crashing sound.

Death.

Feel building shaking.

Leave store while turning on video camera.

Best earthquake pictures ever.
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Forbes View Post

I wonder if they're going to have issues with heating and cooling with so much glass on top?

Well... it might work if they use aerogel. We generally have to use R30 insulation to get the envelope to conform to Title 24 (energy code).

But glass... no way. You might be able to use a radiant floor and displacement ventilation to let hot air stratify at the top, but it would not be a comfortable space.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post

Probably pretty low.

In Santa Monica, average annual daily high is 66F, low is 56F, no humidity issues. The Pacific Ocean provides natural A/C and about three months of the year, you have a marine inversion layer to boot. Just ventilating the structure would probably be sufficient eight or nine months of the year with limited A/C use on the hottest days (mostly in August, September, October).

Prolonged heat spells on the Pacific coast are very rare. Usually after 2-3 days of heat, the marine layer will kick in.

I've lived in Santa Monica. The problem is that much glass traps heat so whilst it might only be 66F outside without A/C it will be a lot hotter inside.
post #16 of 30
If you cover the roof and punch a hole in the wall it also looks like the one we have in chicago.

--SHEFFmachine out
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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post #17 of 30
You beat me to it.

I was visiting LA when the last big earthquake hit. I had just driven from Michigan (in under two days). I got there at about 1 in the morning. I checked into some cheap hotel in West Hollywood. I was awaken by the whole room violently being shaken. I never experienced an earthquake before so I thought this was normal. The shaken was so strong I couldn't have gotten out of bed if I wanted to so I put the blankets over my head and went back to sleep. I woke up the next day around noon and walked outside to see the National Guard lining the streets. Some buildings were leveled. A wall in the hotel I was staying at caved in on top of the pool. A mall a half mile away completely was destroyed. My friend lived in Santa Monica. Many of the buildings there suffered severe damage.

A glass ceiling doesn't seem so bright.


Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Earthquake.

Crashing sound.

Death.
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Earthquake.

Crashing sound.

Death.

Yeah, you'd really be safer under a concrete or steel roof.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already f*ed.

 

Reply
post #19 of 30
That should be fun when an earthquake hits and shatters it into a billion pieces.
post #20 of 30
Anyone know where Apple buys their glass from? Probably worth an investment...

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post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Yeah, you'd really be safer under a concrete or steel roof.

Yes, you would.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Yes, you would.

I'd love to see you argue this point. Would imagine the architects have given some thought to earthquakes. Maybe you could refer to their plans or proposal.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Yes, you would.

The ceiling is only 34 ft high. The walls will be built to sway, the glass will be held loosely in tracks and will feel no tensile stress as the entire ceiling sways gently back and forth.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccamsAftershave View Post

The ceiling is only 34 ft high. The walls will be built to sway, the glass will be held loosely in tracks and will feel no tensile stress as the entire ceiling sways gently back and forth.

It will still make a good video.

WelshDog and other hand-wringers: Try wearing a leek around your neck. Courage!

Edit: It will actually make a better video than the roof crashing in.
post #25 of 30
Very cool design. Hadn't seen the one in NYC either till now. I'm assuming they don't ever see the occasional huge ass hail storms like we see here in Texas every so often....LOL. And I'd like to second the question... does anyone know who makes the glass for them?
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by c4rlob View Post

All the glass and natural lighting make for a grand first impression - I loved first walking into the NYC upper westside store - but as soon as you walk up to a table you see how much of a design mistake it is. The glare it causes on iPads is actually quite significant. It's bad enough that it feels like they're trying to prove the Amazon Kindle ads are right.

Unless Apple is making this decision based on the fact that they know iPads and iPhones will not have glossy screens much longer.

Good point.... I totally forgot about the glare issues from such a roof. So what they need to invent is big floating umbrellas to site over the tables.....LOL. Love all my Macs, but as any who uses one a lot (like me ) will discover, it's a hell of a lot easier on your eyes using them in a darker room.
post #27 of 30
The existing store is too small and the proposed store might be too, unless more are planned for the Westside. This store serves some of the wealthiest communities in the country, including Malibu, Pacific Palisades, Bentwood and most Santa Monica neighborhoods. The City of Santa Monica has about 89k people and the two year budget is 1.27B.

It is too bad they didn't acquire the larger Barnes and Noble Promenade location at the corner of Wilshire, although there might be landmark issues with demolishing it. Luckily the new building is smaller then the old and these properties don't contain apartments. The City has been under the control by a renter's right group for three decades and they want to preserve their voting base. Many apartments are Landmarked.

This is an international tourist destination.

It is also notable that this store has a blind (with blue uniformed dog) staff member and is frequented by Stevie Wonder.

The proposed building is beautiful!
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post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Earthquake.

Crashing sound.

Death.

Do you actually think you were the only one to think of this?


Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

Yes, you would.


Not necessarily.

A building that stood rigid and inflexible in an earthquake regardless of the materials it is made of is more likely to be structurally compromised.

A building that could move and sway with the rocking of an earthquake regardless of the materials it is made of is a building more likely to survive an earthquake.

Today's building codes require large structures to add safety measures to survive earthquakes.

-
post #29 of 30
post #30 of 30
Hi folks,

I work for an international glass design firm here in Los Angeles.

The future is here folks. through innovations, and discoveries related to the material referred to as "Glass" which is basically made of ? can you answer?
Answer is plain old SAND.

thats right 90% of the active material in everyday used glass is silica or sand.

anyhow the glass being used in the new Santa Monica Store will be

1- Much more esthetically pleasing to the eye as well as the environment than concrete or steel by far.

2- The glass will be 100% safer and earthquake resistant than concrete or steel .

3- The glass make up achieves the best combination of energy saving through heating/cooling as well as electrical usage for lighting up the place.
A significant saving .. means compared to a store without the glass roof the elec. bill will be cut by a minimum of 50% .

and guess what else the actual glass has so many other functions and capabilities

I almost forgot another important detail.

has anyone ever heard of glare free glass?

yes its a type of glass that is glare resistant. it also can be manufactured to completely illuminate shadows, and glare .

just another innovation in the world of that barely seen or appreciated material
(by the way its also the most abundant and least expensive to make) called

G L A S S .
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