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Apple has seen 'significant' slowdown in Mac sales, report claims - Page 3

post #81 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpics View Post

Zandros has it right here - about the rest of the discounts pointed out by others being always available and this year's seasonal one being "not as valuable" parts at least - the actual sales results may be another matter with a) all of Apple's momentum on one side arrayed against b) anxiety about economies and markets and c) the iPad effect noted above). So we'll just have to see on that score. However....

Actually, I want to clarify that I didn't mean it would be strictly worse, but instead that it might not be as good as the growth rate might have suggested it would've been. Which, in some ways, could be interpreted as a slowdown.
post #82 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by shen View Post

Must be why there are so many Macs and iPads being used to take notes in my classes...
Or another possibility, you hang out with stupid kids. Actually, the xbox comment makes that statement redundant.

Agreed. The dude who posted that kids just want to play games and blast music.... Um "they" want to do those things on the item that has the HIGHEST cool factor. And what company consistently receives research numbers in the stratosphere?????????????Apple. Nuff said. Kids here in Los Angeles would give away their parents, their right nut, their skateboards, surfboards, and more in order to get their hands on a iPod touch, iPhone, iPad, and soon Apple TV. Apple products are at the TOP of kids "WANT" list.

The nit wit ANAL-yst cited in this story is way off base. He claims he contacted 4 University stores.. Which ones? BS, funny here is where he FAILS.

EVERY APPLE STORE in America now gives STUDENT discounts with VALID i.d.'s. Where are students shopping these days? Apple Stores. So by what measure can the analyst say with conviction that Mac sales fell off a cliff?? Epic Fail.

I will say that the Microsoft ads in the LA market are saturated and of course will gain PARENTS attention more but.... Kid tantrums usually prevail. One last important note - it's a CREDIT to Apple's power in the market that MICROSOFT is FORCED and DESPERATE to get customers focused on it's uncool platform by BRIBING them with a free xbox promotion In the end -- any kids that do buy into the Windows Xbox promo will ultimately buy into one of the top Apple products soon after anyway - I say that with certainty.
post #83 of 111
Quote:

"If I were running Apple, I would milk the Macintosh for all it's worth -- and get busy on the next great thing. The PC wars are over. Done. Microsoft won a long time ago."-- Fortune, Feb. 19, 1996 (or about a year before he became CEO)


Quote:
"The Mac has outlived its usefulness."
--Steve Jobs, circa 1996 (or about a year before he became CEO)


When Apple stopped advertising the Mac (in the way it does the iPhone and iPad, now), it took a little time for the Mac marketing message to wear off. (It was an attention-grabbing and hard-to-forget campaign and was cited about as an American cultural icon.)

Well, it's worn off and starting to be reflected in Mac sales -- exactly according to Steve Jobs' plan.

He hates the Mac and wants it gone.

The day in 2009 that it was announced that Apple was killing the "Hi. I'm a Mac. And I'm a PC" television ad campaign I participated in some Apple forums and suggested that we would not see another Mac television ad campaign to follow in its wake.

This ad campaign.

The Awards Committee said, "The 'Get a Mac' campaign personified each and the result was magic. A simple, charming metaphor with all the reasons to get a Mac. Market share grew by 42%, Apple had record sales and the campaign was culturally influential."

Back then, I was unmercifully flamed to death for predicting that there would be no Mac ad campaign to follow and was assured by other posters that Apple was just switching and retiring the television ad campaign and that a fresh one would follow in its wake.

'It was time that campaign was ended; it has exhausted every possible scenario and Apple has simply run out of ideas for new editions of those ads,' posters told me.

(I said at the time they weren't giving the most innovative company on the planet enough credit; that of all companies, Apple was not one to run out of new ideas and that there were limitless unique scenarios Apple could use to continue the very effective television ad campaign indefinitely -- limited, I should say, only by the imagination.)

Though they were in various forums, I would like to ask my "flamers," "How now brown cow?"

I hate to say "I hate to say I told you so," but...

If anyone has seen any recent television or print ads for the Mac that I missed, please let me know. (And, yes, I've seen the sparse Web banner ads.)

Sometimes (though rarely) Steve Jobs changes his mind or acquiesces (like he did with the name "iMac," which he did not like.)

More often, he is so intransigent in his positions that it would be easier to invent a time travel machine than to change his mind -- even using indisputable facts and clear evidence in your attempt. (Facts have no place in Steve's Reality Distortion Zone.)

Steve's long-term goal is to send the Mac out to pasture. However, he is smart enough to know that, as much as he'd like to, he cannot write his signature on a document that grinds Mac production to a halt this minute. (Again, as much as he'd like to.) Until then, we all owe him praise for his tolerance and patience.

He has contracts with other companies to consider; he must convince upper-echelon management (e.g. COO, Tim Cook; CFO, Peter Oppenheimer, et al). He has a board of directors to convince. He has large shareholders with proportionate voting rights to convince, he has the rest of Wall Street to convince, and last AND least, he has loyal Mac customers to convince.

After the switch to Intel processors, Apple continued to support PowerPC Mac users for approximately four years. After the switch to higher-powered Intel processors, Apple continued to support early Intel Mac owners for a period of approximately four years. I would expect that the phasing out of the Mac will occur over a similar time period -- unless Steve Jobs can accelerate it somehow.

Between now and then (and below the radar), Steve Jobs will take inconspicuous steps to gradually drain the life out of the Mac. He will leave no fingerprints behind, but will eventually have in hand the evidence necessary to convince his top management, the board of directors, large shareholders, small shareholders, "The Street" overall, ISVs, customers and channel partners that the Mac has had a good run, but it is in the best interest of this company to retire it.

As I predicted at the time it was said, the 2008 "bag of hurt" alibi had far greater implications than appeared on its face. (Of course I was flamed to death for identifying those implications.)

Jobs has shown amazing patience and tolerance since then, but is finally getting his wish. Soon all optical media and devices will not be supported on any Apple products. (But Blu-ray and backwards-compatible optical discs WILL on Windows PCs and laptops, perhaps putting the Mac at a serious competitive disadvantage -- but that may not be a bad thing, right, Steve?)

Wishful thinkers will dismiss that the "Mac" has been removed from OS X's name as inconsequential, and my suggestions that, instead, it is far more foreboding than it initially appears, will naturally go unheeded. (Grab the flamethrower!)

That, released in 2010, (Mac) OS X Lion is bereft of MAJOR changes in its underlying technology (as compared to Tiger (2004) and Leopard (2006)), and that the major changes were all user-visible GUI changes -- essentially performing a face transplant of iOS's interface over (what is still called) Aqua.

In the 7 years since Tiger introduced monumental software technology innovations to the underlying (non-user-visible) OS (e.g. Core APIs), and *5 years ago, Leopard topped Tiger with still more huge improvements to the underlying OS, added Core APIs, and doubled the power and functionality of the Core APIs introduced in Tiger, how monumental are the non-GUI changes to Lion, 7 years after Tiger? In the interstitial 7 years have the Core APIs seen spectacular improvements? Core Image (which made Adobe upset because it was like building Photoshop into the OS -- but who cares; Apple has shown an indifference to upsetting Adobe, who, BTW, is too lazy to improve Photoshop to take advantage of dual-chip, multi-core processor technology or Grand Central Dispatch or OpenCL) has not seen milestone changes over the last 7 years. The same is true of other APIs.

Steve Jobs talked on stage about how touch doesn't translate to desktops or laptops because your choices are limited in how you can orient the machine, and one's arm gets tired after constantly lifting it up to touch the screen of a more desktop or laptop display.

But then he overlays iOS's GUI over OS X. (Has anyone else noticed the recent tidal wave of "How To" articles and Mac utilities designed to restore "The Mac As We've Known It" to Lion, and to go around the iOS infected features?")

This is an ingredient in the strategy: get Mac users acclimated to "The iOS way," and they'll forget all about using machines "The Mac Way."

This will lay the ground for when when the Mac finally vaporizes, and every Mac user will be like, "Meh," hardly noticing as they play Angry Birds 19. (BTW, if birds can fly, why the slingshot?)

The Mac will go out with a whimper, not a bang.

MAC OS X gave birth to iPhone OS/iOS, and now iOS is systematically swallowing MAC OS X. (Kind of like how Gilbert Amelio created Steve Jobs v. 2.0, and Jobs promptly swallowed Gilbert Amelio and "eliminated" him (ahem...as with food). Oh -- but Steve was never the least bit interested in becoming Apple CEO, anyway. He was dragged kicking and screaming into it and did so only with the most reluctance. This, despite what occurred only a year earlier.

That perfunctory "straw man" CEO search committee never got very far. Could it be because "interim" CEO Jobs had the final say and shot down each and every candidate put forth by the committee? (Refer to last link and "There's only*only one person...")

But what about the "Mac App Store?" you ask?

"What about the (Mac) OS X Lion promotion prominently displayed on Apple's website?"

All window dressing and alibis no different than "the bag of hurt" that, as I predicted, would translate to the elimination of optical media entirely on Apple products. With the MacBook Air and the Mac mini, the process is underway.

Remember, the plan is to drain the life out of the Mac below the radar and leave no fingerprints.

And to the question "Where is a new Mac Pro model?" I'm not sure there WILL be a new Mac Pro model. I hope I am wrong on this one. For decades, I have bought the top-of-the-line model of every newly released tower Mac model Apple has put out. But I've stopped holding my breath for a 16-core model.

Even as skillful as Apple has been lately at printing leaks, I've read too many times -- often from key members of the (Mac) OS X team -- that there has been a "brain drain" of talent from the (Mac) OS X software engineering team who were reappointed to work on iOS. Very key talent was raided and not replaced. All part of the plan.

The plan with Lion is less about the Mac and more about iOS.

There was an outcry when the earliest versions of (Mac) OS X decidedly lacked "Mac-ness." Before violence erupted, Apple restored some of the Mac HUI elements to OS X that made a Mac a Mac.

Oh, Steve Jobs DOES respond to loyal customer demand once a decade or so. When the din is so loud that he feels vulnerable to hearing loss, Jobs relents to the demands of his "loyal subjects," like he (only VERY eventually) did with the Bondi iMac's round "hockey puck" mouse.

So even if none of what I've written is true, but the Mac's sales are declining, posing an existential threat, is there nothing we can do?

Well, if you're on the fence, you could make a decision and buy a new Mac (preferably one with an optical drive). You could patronize the Mac App Store. You could be an unofficial salesman and convince people you know who are in the market for a computer to buy a Mac. (Mentioning, as Apple does NOT, that Macs run the latest version of Windows, but Windows machines do not run the Mac's operating system, so they're getting the "best" of both worlds (not really). Don't worry, everyone I know who has used Windows on their Macs via Boot Camp, Parallels or Fusion, briefly uses Windows, but find they much prefer the Mac environment.)

You could contact everyone you can think of at Apple expressing your concern for the Mac's future and your desire to see them to continue investing in the Mac and (Mac) OS X and your intent to continue buying Macs well into the future. (And stop the internal "brain drain already! I accept recently departed (Mac) OS X's lead engineer, Bertrand Serlet's dignified, amicable "official, on-the-record" statement for why he was leaving Apple, but I can't help but wonder if there's more to the story.

You could protest.*Put a link to google.com on your bookmarks bar, and stop using Safari's upper-right corner search field.

Stop using Safari and use instead Firefox, Chrome or Opera.

Never click on a web ad with "iAd" in the lower right corner.

I've never owned a Windows machine and hope never to have to. But if Steve Jobs expects that Pro users will eventually be using iOS devices to run Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite 5, or Final Cut (whatever), or AutoCAD or Maya or Shade 12 or Logic Studio or Cinema 4D or KeyShot or Blender or Pixar's Tractor or ZBrush or LightWave 10 or Avid Media Composer on anything but a screaming fast, dual-processor, multi-core, 64-bit (probably 128-bit by the time ARM gets to 64-bit), Hyperthreading, Grand Central Dispatch optimized, expandable Tower Mac with 48GB RAM, 6TB internal storage*and far more external storage, an internal Blu-ray burner (or HVD burner) on multiple 30" or bigger displays with the widest gamut color possible with 13 or 18-bit CLUTs, and a GPU card running at petaflops/s and taking full advantage of OpenCL, he IS one of "the crazy ones."

I own iPods and three iOS devices including an iPad 2 AND LOVE them all! They do what they do GREAT!

But the Mac does different things from iOS devices and it does those GREAT!

I need both. I should think Apple would approve of the idea of a person needing (and buying) iOS devices AND Macs (in my case, $12,000+ Macs).

As described in The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, protest or airing grievances may be the most loyal and caring things you can do.

Taking issue with Apple or Steve Jobs is not disloyalty. Au contraire, it may be the most loyal, caring thing you can do.

Blind faith, always agreeing, sitting ildey by and doing nothing, sometimes proves to be disloyal.



P.S. For the record, I LOVE Apple I love my iPod, my iOS devices (especially my iPad 2) and I LOVE my Mac -- and I worship and love the genius, Steve Jobs.......and hate him. It's a love/hate thing.

FLAMERS: START YOUR FLAMETHROWERS!

post #84 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

He hates the Mac and wants it gone.

You can't say this and use quotes from before the iMac existed to back it up. That was a completely different Steve.

There will always be larger-than-mobile computers. And Apple will always be selling at least one of them.

Quote:
Stop using Safari and use instead Firefox, Chrome or Opera.

And why the frick would I voluntarily stop using the best browser out there? That's nonsense.

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as Apple does NOT

Ninth square. First question. Fourth square. Second movie.

Look, I respect your opinion. I just find your opinion completely wrong. You sound like the opposite of what I believe about the Mac, but you say it just how I'd say it. Gotta respect that.

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
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Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #85 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

P.S. For the record, I LOVE Apple I love my iPod, my iOS devices (especially my iPad 2) and I LOVE my Mac -- and I worship and love the genius, Steve Jobs.......and hate him. It's a love/hate thing.

[B]FLAMERS: START YOUR FLAMETHROWERS!doomed.

Is this a certain Pixar person?
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #86 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by CvilleFan View Post

Our university bookstore is slow because THERE ARE NO STUDENTS ON CAMPUS.

College starts in 2 weeks.

This analyst is a moron.

Oh, yeah? Well I can confirm that I walked by my local Apple Store at 3:00 am Sunday morning and there was NOT A SINGLE PERSON IN THE STORE.

Apple is doomed.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #87 of 111
Libel.

If AAPL takes a hit for this BS report, they need to haul up this Chowdhury dude for lying maliciously about the company.
post #88 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

He hates the Mac and wants it gone....

But then he overlays iOS's GUI over OS X. (Has anyone else noticed the recent tidal wave of "How To" articles and Mac utilities designed to restore "The Mac As We've Known It" to Lion, and to go around the iOS infected features?")

This is an ingredient in the strategy: get Mac users acclimated to "The iOS way," and they'll forget all about using machines "The Mac Way."

This will lay the ground for when when the Mac finally vaporizes, and every Mac user will be like, "Meh," hardly noticing as they play Angry Birds 19. (BTW, if birds can fly, why the slingshot?)

The Mac will go out with a whimper, not a bang.

MAC OS X gave birth to iPhone OS/iOS, and now iOS is systematically swallowing MAC OS X. (Kind of like how Gilbert Amelio created Steve Jobs v. 2.0, and Jobs promptly swallowed Gilbert Amelio and "eliminated" him (ahem...as with food). Oh -- but Steve was never the least bit interested in becoming Apple CEO, anyway. He was dragged kicking and screaming into it and did so only with the most reluctance. This, despite what occurred only a year earlier.

That perfunctory "straw man" CEO search committee never got very far. Could it be because "interim" CEO Jobs had the final say and shot down each and every candidate put forth by the committee? (Refer to last link and "There's only*only one person...")

But what about the "Mac App Store?" you ask?

"What about the (Mac) OS X Lion promotion prominently displayed on Apple's website?"

All window dressing and alibis no different than "the bag of hurt" that, as I predicted, would translate to the elimination of optical media entirely on Apple products. With the MacBook Air and the Mac mini, the process is underway.

Remember, the plan is to drain the life out of the Mac below the radar and leave no fingerprints.

And to the question "Where is a new Mac Pro model?" I'm not sure there WILL be a new Mac Pro model. I hope I am wrong on this one. For decades, I have bought the top-of-the-line model of every newly released tower Mac model Apple has put out. But I've stopped holding my breath for a 16-core model.


I've never owned a Windows machine and hope never to have to. But if Steve Jobs expects that Pro users will eventually be using iOS devices to run Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite 5, or Final Cut (whatever), or AutoCAD or Maya or Shade 12 or Logic Studio or Cinema 4D or KeyShot or Blender or Pixar's Tractor or ZBrush or LightWave 10 or Avid Media Composer on anything but a screaming fast, dual-processor, multi-core, 64-bit (probably 128-bit by the time ARM gets to 64-bit), Hyperthreading, Grand Central Dispatch optimized, expandable Tower Mac with 48GB RAM, 6TB internal storage*and far more external storage, an internal Blu-ray burner (or HVD burner) on multiple 30" or bigger displays with the widest gamut color possible with 13 or 18-bit CLUTs, and a GPU card running at petaflops/s and taking full advantage of OpenCL, he IS one of "the crazy ones."

But the Mac does different things from iOS devices and it does those GREAT!

I need both. I should think Apple would approve of the idea of a person needing (and buying) iOS devices AND Macs (in my case, $12,000+ Macs).


Blind faith, always agreeing, sitting ildey by and doing nothing, sometimes proves to be disloyal.




I think you are being a bit too negative. Both Apple and Microsoft are preparing for the post-PC era. Look at the early designs for Windows 8, and it looks just like a Windows Phone shell placed on top of Windows 7. Apple took a different approach with Lion, but the concept is the same (merging the tablet and desktop OS). Consider that the iPad is as powerful as the desktop PCs we used to use just about 10 years ago, and I think what you'll find is that the vast majority of us will be able to tap enough power from a single device in 10 years time. It's not that Steve Jobs "hates Macs," it's just that he sees the future in iOS. The key word here is future. Don't compare the iPad of today to your computing needs and declare that it can never work.

Regarding optical drives, how is this any different to the 1998 iMac? Lack of BluRay isn't much of a disadvantage since it hasn't gotten much traction. Jobs' disdain for optical is driven by iTunes. With the Cloud becoming more prevalent, we'll have less media stored on our devices, and thus less need for physical media (which degrades over time).

In the meantime, we'll still see a lot of decent Macs. Consider the significant upgrade the MacBook Air got. Intel has even defined a new class of PCs to copy it. The Mac Pro hasn't been upgraded since the suitable Sandy Bridge processors aren't out yet, and the top-end iMac is more than capable for most users in the meantime. Apple is definitely a consumer-oriented company, and I wouldn't be surprised if the Mac Pro is dropped eventually, but I don't think it will be in 2011.
post #89 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by NZK88 View Post

indicated that this year's back-to-school promotion, offering a $100 App Store gift card, is not adequate. He said most parents would rather receive $100 cash back on education pricing.

"This same analyst, however, did not bother researching the educational promotion, which saves you a minimum of $100 on a MacBook Pro, and $66 on AppleCare in addition to the meager $100 gift card."

Yep

We'll see when the quarter numbers come out how well sales were


Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesTheLesser View Post

This.

I'm no investor, but I've heard it said quite a few times that Apple stock is one of the easiest to manipulate.

Yep. Start a rumor that Steve Jobs died. Thanks to all the folks that still think that Jobs is the only brain at Apple, the stock price will go down to pennies. You buy a bunch of shares. Wait for word to get out that Jobs is not dead and within 48 hours the price is back up. You just made a pile of money

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zandros View Post

Although it does that all-year round. Ostensibly, the back-to school promotions are intended to strengthen sales in what would otherwise be a less profitable quarter.

the BTS gives sites like AI an excuse to get page hits and remind folks that Apple does a student discount, at no cost to Apple. That's half the reason they do it.

Quote:
If the promotion is not as valuable to the consumer compared to previous years, it could very well lead to a relatively worse quarter than last year.

In the age of 12 year olds with iphones, the ipod deal isn't really as awesome as it was. Free software etc is something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by martimus3060 View Post

Shaw Wu is another analyst who seems to get things wrong quite a bit,

I have a friend that actually uses the phrase 'you totally Shaw Wu'd that one'

Quote:
Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post

The first problem I have with this is that most Mac Back To Scools sales happen well before August. Depending upon the school some students are probably already back to school or in a mad rush to get ready. The whole point with the early summer start of these sales programs is to capture customers before their minds turn to otherthings.

They also do it as one last buy for the college grads. Try to get them to spend their gift money on a new computer rather than clothes or whatever

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One is the assumption that people are happy with the non discount.

What about the assumption that they aren't happy. Remember that there are few discounts by Apple. If anything, parents are unhappy that only the college kids get the discount cause their precious middle school kids are expected to have laptops

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The second issue is that the dropping of the Mac Book and pushing of the AIRs is extremely stupid.

1. The new Airs are way more powerful than before.

2. They likely have sales numbers that show that the Airs and the Pro were selling great. The Macbook, little to nada. Why waste resources on something that is not selling.

Thus would seems stupid to you could be a well researched and thought out very smart business decision

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In the end many customers will walk away from Apple and the AIRs simply because they have to think about the machines suitability for their needs.

Or they will buy what is there that suits their needs and not really think twice about the notion that there should be a slightly cheaper slightly lesser notebook in the mix

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People will look at the AIR and see that it comes up short in a number of ways.

And grab a Macbook Pro. Done.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BUSHMAN4 View Post

If sales are actually slowing perhaps it can be attributed to the 'yellow screen problem that some of the 21 & 27 inch IMacs are having.
In any case this can't beva plus for Apple and needs to be fixed

yeah that was a 'problem' like a year ago that was talked about a lot but turned out to be only in like 1% of units that were custom config'd and maybe 1/10% of store units. For a period of 2 months. And then it was fixed and now it happens perhaps 0.0001% of the time.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #90 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You can't say this and use quotes from before the iMac existed to back it up. That was a completely different Steve.

I like your endearing optimism. It isn't just I who have noticed sometimes stark (positive) changes in Steve 2.0, but at the same time, some of his habits and behaviors have not changed. Steve 2.0 is not a "completely different" person.

Read the books. He has a history of treating an Apple product as his favorite child, the apple of his eye (pun not initially intended), only to suddenly turn on it and get out "The long knives." This pattern of behavior has occurred repeatedly.

Don't take my word for this pattern of behavior, ask people like Owen Linzmayer and Leander Kahney.

I didn't make the statement ad hominem; there's some history there.

I'm telling you, he wants to sunset the Mac when it has a bright history before it of indefinite length.

His incessant talk of the "Post PC Era" cannot simply be ignored if you are a loyal Mac user. Plus, it refers to ALL personal computers; the Mac is no exception. His only problem is impatience. Not advertising the Mac and raiding the Mac hardware engineering team and the (Mac) OS X software engineering team are steps to hasten the end of the Mac as a "blight" in his field of vision.

If your business philosophy is that it's "The Post PC Era," do you spend advertising dollars on a product whose time has passed? Do you invest more R&D dollars on hardware and software engineering of a product that's in its "post" era? Or do you loot the project of resources and talent and reallocate them to the current apple of your eye? At best, you keep the product on life support and afford it only minimal resources.

The obvious lack of motivation to ever-improve (Mac) OS X by making major changes to the technologies that underlie the User Interface is evidence that is hard to ignore. Did you read John Siracusa's review of Lion? He seemed to struggle in his attempts to cover innovative changes to the non-user-visible technicals.

Why HFS+ still? Why do I need to run DiskWarrior? Why do I need to regularly run Disk Utility to repair any one of my disks?

In the 7 years since Tiger, by what percentage did the Core APIs (e.g. Core Image) change in 7 years with Lion?

If a product becomes a "black sheep" (from the top management down), motivation to re-revolutionize (Mac) OS X as Apple has done with major milestone releases like Tiger and Leopard is weak at best. No will? No way.

If the Mac IS to fade as a product, let it happen organically, naturally. Let the marketplace and the consumer decide, don't proactively hasten its demise, disdainful of what loyal Apple customers want. Is that a request that's unreasonable?

I've been a loyal Apple customer since I got an Apple //e as a kid. I was a little late coming to the Mac, waiting for color and expansion slots. I think my first Mac was a Mac IIcx. Since, I can't count the number of Macs I've bought. I know I've spent close to 200,000 on Apple products. I have never owned a non-Apple computer. I am lost when a friend asks me to fix a software issue on a Windows PC -- I don't know how to use one.

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There will always be larger-than-mobile computers. And Apple will always be selling at least one of them.

You are 100% correct: Apple will sell one laptop with a separate screen and keyboard, the AirBook (not "Mac" anything) and it will run iOS. (BTW, Steve Jobs' hatred of buttons include the keys on your keyboard. Apple is researching a flat keyboard (like on the iPad screen) that gives haptic feedback to replace the satisfying tactile confirmation of pressing down on a key on a "full travel" keyboard (I insist on owning a Matias tactilepro -- now the tactilepro 2. I type faster on it (probably because I'm positive when I've pressed a key -- and it's just plain NICE!) )

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And why the frick would I voluntarily stop using the best browser out there? That's nonsense.

I have agreed with you for years and years and years, and Safari was the only browser I ever used. But I can no longer say that since some very recent releases of Chrome and Firefox -- and even Opera! I'd love to use Safari exclusively, and am not happy about my need to turn to any other browser. But if you spend enough time on the web, seconds add up to minutes, and minutes ad up to hours. I do admire Apple's leadership on HTML5 (for the benefit of iOS devices of course).

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Look, I respect your opinion. I just find your opinion completely wrong. You sound like the opposite of what I believe about the Mac, but you say it just how I'd say it. Gotta respect that.

And I respect yours. But -- this is not bravado -- I found not one person who agreed with me about what the "bag of hurt" alibi was to portend. And what I predicted in the post came to pass.

I found not one person who agreed with my prediction, the day Apple announced the "Get a Mac" television ad campaign had ended, that a new television ad campaign for the Mac would NOT follow -- and the predictions in that post came to pass. People guaranteed me a brand new Mac television ad campaign was forthcoming and would flood the airwaves forthwith. I must have missed them.

I don't shoot from the hip when I write in these posts. Behind what I say is a lot of thinking, analysis, close observation of history and some knowledge about how Steve Jobs operates.

Believe me: a multifaceted scheme is underway to undermine the Mac, make it a liability for Apple and justify its discontinuation to all concerned. The personal destruction and ouster of Gil Amelio is a handy allegory for what's in store for the future of the Mac.

I repeat what I believe to be true: Steve Jobs hates the Mac and wants it gone.

post #91 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by ameldrum1 View Post

Analysts are not legally permitted to own or trade stock that they cover.

What are you trying to do here, ruin a perfectly good conspiracy theory? I mean, it's obvious that this guy was responsible for the $0.04 drop in AAPL today and he made a total killing by shorting the stock.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #92 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Chowdhry said that Mac sales at the University of Katmandu were particularly disappointing...

... though, a contributing factor may be that the U of K doesn't sell Macs...

Dick, the first rule of the U of K is that you do not talk about the U of K. The second rule of the U of K is that YOU DO NOT TALK ABOUT the U of K.
post #93 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

When Apple stopped advertising the Mac (in the way it does the iPhone and iPad, now), it took a little time for the Mac marketing message to wear off. (It was an attention-grabbing and hard-to-forget campaign and was cited about as an American cultural icon.)

Well, it's worn off and starting to be reflected in Mac sales -- exactly according to Steve Jobs' plan.

He hates the Mac and wants it gone....


Man, that post when on for Infinity and Beyond!
post #94 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

I think you are being a bit too negative. Both Apple and Microsoft are preparing for the post-PC era. Look at the early designs for Windows 8, and it looks just like a Windows Phone shell placed on top of Windows 7. Apple took a different approach with Lion, but the concept is the same (merging the tablet and desktop OS). Consider that the iPad is as powerful as the desktop PCs we used to use just about 10 years ago, and I think what you'll find is that the vast majority of us will be able to tap enough power from a single device in 10 years time. It's not that Steve Jobs "hates Macs," it's just that he sees the future in iOS. The key word here is future. Don't compare the iPad of today to your computing needs and declare that it can never work.

Regarding optical drives, how is this any different to the 1998 iMac? Lack of BluRay isn't much of a disadvantage since it hasn't gotten much traction. Jobs' disdain for optical is driven by iTunes. With the Cloud becoming more prevalent, we'll have less media stored on our devices, and thus less need for physical media (which degrades over time).

In the meantime, we'll still see a lot of decent Macs. Consider the significant upgrade the MacBook Air got. Intel has even defined a new class of PCs to copy it. The Mac Pro hasn't been upgraded since the suitable Sandy Bridge processors aren't out yet, and the top-end iMac is more than capable for most users in the meantime. Apple is definitely a consumer-oriented company, and I wouldn't be surprised if the Mac Pro is dropped eventually, but I don't think it will be in 2011.


I agree with you, he was being way too negative. At any stage of the history of the new Steve's Apple he made changes that were considered the death of something dearly loved only to be proved totally correct. I think he simply pops back from the future to be honest

The one thing I want rid of that's new (please tell me there is an off switch I missed) is Lion's auto correction. People can figure out what i meant even with a typo most times ... this new thing of totally new but incorrect words spelled correctly being substituted is orangutans blossom.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #95 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post

Man, that post when on for Infinity and Beyond!

Lasiter or Newman maybe?
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #96 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by macFanDave View Post

Libel.

If AAPL takes a hit for this BS report, they need to haul up this Chowdhury dude for lying maliciously about the company.

Not going to happen. The guy posted his results and told how he got them. The rest is his interpretation - and is clearly labeled as such.

Stupidity is completely legal in the U.S.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ameldrum1 View Post

Analysts are not legally permitted to own or trade stock that they cover.

Not universally true. It depends on the analyst and their role. Some analysts (think talking heads) do own stocks. They are required to report their ownership of a company they talk about (and often simply refrain from talking about companies they own), but it's not illegal.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #97 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

And to the question "Where is a new Mac Pro model?" I'm not sure there WILL be a new Mac Pro model.

You posted an enormous amount of drivel that all points to the same argument - that you think the Mac is dead. What a waste of readers' time. Are you truly incapable of forming a concise argument?

The argument that Apple is abandoning the Mac is insanely stupid. The Mac is a key part of Apple's strategy and there is absolutely no sign that it's dead. In fact, Apple continues to develop it. Will they take iOS features and migrate them to the Mac? Sure. Just as they'll do the opposite.

Now, that doesn't mean that it won't change. Is it possible that there won't be a new Mac Pro? Yes, just not very likely. Apple understands that they need to offer a range of products.

Besides, this is the same nonsense that we've been hearing for 20 years.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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post #98 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I disagree.

Apple still has a full performance low end notebook, in fact it has the best one you can buy for the money. It's just that instead of being made of plastic and costing roughly 800 it's made of aluminium and costs 1,000.

Your statement about "shoring up the sales of Airs," makes no sense at all. Macbook Airs practically fly off the shelves now. It's one of the most popular products they make and doesn't need any "shoring up" at all.

No, he's right. That $200 really, really matters. Not having a "real" notebook at the sub-$1000 price (less edu discounts) is going to hurt sales to students. There's no way around it. Some of them will buy airs instead, a few will cough up the extra cash for a pro, but some will look elsewhere.
post #99 of 111
How hard is it to understand that people were waiting for the new MacBook Air that everyone knew was coming..... Also everyone knew that Apple often throws in a little surprise like the updated Mac Mini at the same time....
post #100 of 111
I think Apple's doing just fine.

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/af5db...#axzz1VOHupiYC


The world is a lot bigger place than just the US.
post #101 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post

No, he's right. That $200 really, really matters. Not having a "real" notebook at the sub-$1000 price (less edu discounts) is going to hurt sales to students. There's no way around it. Some of them will buy airs instead, a few will cough up the extra cash for a pro, but some will look elsewhere.

Since when is the MacBook Air not a 'real' notebook? It does everything a notebook would be expected to do.

It really bugs me the way people somehow start with "I want feature xyz" and immediately translate that to "unless a computer has feature xyz, it's not a REAL computer".

While more RAM would be nice and help to future-proof the system, it is a perfectly capable system for its target audience. For the average student taking notes, searching the web, sending email, etc, it's more than powerful enough (heck, my 3 year old MBP with 2.33 GHz Core2Duo is fine for all those things).

I have to laugh at the person who said that the SSD's limited storage makes it useless for a student who will have to keep 4 years worth of information on the computer. This logic is grossly flawed for several reasons:
1. Student work is tiny compared to the storage available. If you get the 256 GB (or even the 128 GB), it will have plenty of space unless you're studying videography (in which case you're not buying the Air, anyway). A reasonable sized Word document is a couple MB at most. Let's say you have to store 100 major reports - that's under a GB. Maybe one power point per semester? A couple more GB.
2. With Thunderbolt, transferring data to a storage drive is trivial-and fast. The student can take 5 minutes to copy their work to the backup drive at the end of the semester - and delete it from the MBA is storage space is that tight (hint: it won't be - see above).
3. A lot of students have both a desktop and laptop. The laptop is used solely for notes, etc. If so, there's no problem.
4. Even the low end MBA is vastly more powerful than a computer that's even a couple of years old - and people are still using them. I'm still using the 3 year old MBP mentioned above for all my day to day business work - and the computer is not limiting me in any way.

Of course, not everyone can get by with that. A few people need the power of an MBP (or even a Mac Pro), but they're not the target audience for the Air.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
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post #102 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post

Man, that post when on for Infinity and Beyond!

My bad.

post #103 of 111
Looky



Looky, looky: Newsweek!



Though logic and reason often play no part in Steve Jobs' cherished beliefs, today's news of HP "parachuting" out of its "burning plane," this is what football quarterbacks call "the hole." If Jobs was more committed to the Mac, he could use some of Apple's nearly $80 billion hoard of cash and launch a highly-visible Mac marketing campaign, similar to the commitment to the Mac when the "Get a Mac" television ad campaign was running with ever-fresh and hilarious scenarios that gave meaning to the term "PC Weenie."

But he won't. The obvious beneficiary, though only fortuitously, will be Dell. It could be Apple.

I read an article not too long ago that had in its title "Tablet Makers Worried Apple Will 'iPod' the Tablet Market."

With today's HP News, Apple (though with the chronology reversed) could parlay the opportunity such that they could "Mac" the personal computer market.

Give it a shot, Steve!

If you can afford to dabble in money-losing experiments like "Apple TV," you can surely afford to exploit this unexpected and rare opportunity with a highly-visible Mac marketing campaign (including the "necessary evil" of making sure everyone knows Macs run Windows -- even XP if you prefer!).

Will he or won't he?

My prediction: He won't



post #104 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post

Man, that post when on for Infinity and Beyond!

My bad.



And the spelling mistake ("when" instead of "went") was my bad!
post #105 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post


Looky



Looky, looky: Newsweek!




With today's HP News, Apple (though with the chronology reversed) could parlay the opportunity such that they could "Mac" the personal computer market.

Give it a shot, Steve!

If you can afford to dabble in money-losing experiments like "Apple TV," you can surely afford to exploit this unexpected and rare opportunity with a highly-visible Mac marketing campaign (including the "necessary evil" of making sure everyone knows Macs run Windows -- even XP if you prefer!).

Will he or won't he?

My prediction: He won't

A year-old Newsweek article (before the announcement of Lion and the revamped MacBook Air) and a small UK blog aren't exactly compelling evidence. Apple is a consumer-oriented company. They will keep making Macs as long as they tap a lucrative consumer market.

That said, I highly doubt they want to "Mac" HP's PC business. First, much of HP's PC business is in the enterprise market (selling Elitebooks to big companies thousands at a time for a small upfront margin and providing back-end support for a higher margin). Apple doesn't compete in that business. Remember, Apple is consumer-oriented. Second, they don't compete in HP's consumer segment, which is made up mostly mid-range Pavilion notebooks that sell for about $600-900. The Envy line is really a small part of HP's business, and one that Apple does quite well in with its current lineup.

Remember, Apple cares more about margin than volume. With iPad, they have both, but with the iPhone and Mac markets they seem content to let others bottom feed while they take the more lucrative premium segments.
post #106 of 111
Would this be a time for Apple to produce the "Xmac" that some folks [like me :-)] want?
post #107 of 111
Your thoughtful post is appreciated. One doesn't have to agree with me for me to appreciate quality contributions to the dialogue (as long as its dignified and mature).

Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

A year-old Newsweek article (before the announcement of Lion and the revamped MacBook Air) and a small UK blog aren't exactly compelling evidence. Apple is a consumer-oriented company. They will keep making Macs as long as they tap a lucrative consumer market.

We agree with the exception of Apple's approach. Apple could take a laissez faire approach to the Mac and not promote it (outside of their website). Let it fend for itself in the marketplace with no concerted marketing effort behind it and only word-of-mouth (from "cheerleaders" like me) to promote its sale.

Or, if they have a nearly $80 billion cash hoard and can afford to pursue what they have been directly quoting as a "hobby at this point," Apple TV, they can afford to at least lift a finger to promote the Mac. I can't see how this is an unreasonable position.

The BIG difference, is that, unlike the money-losing "hobby," Apple TV, I will bet anyone (donation to charity of their choice) that some Mac television, print, and, yes, RADIO, advertisements would more than pay for themselves in increased Mac sales. (I could get into the whole discounted and underutilized radio ad matter, but this post will end up far too long as it is. I CAN'T HELP IT! IT'S AN APPLE PASSION THING!)

Quote:
That said, I highly doubt they want to "Mac" HP's PC business.

You misunderstand me.

Quote:
Second, they don't compete in HP's consumer segment, which is made up mostly mid-range Pavilion notebooks that sell for about $600-900. The Envy line is really a small part of HP's business, and one that Apple does quite well in with its current lineup.

I'm not talking about shuffling Apple's product line positioning in the wake of the HP news, I'm talking about advertising the Mac!

HP and Dell's BIGGEST mistake was buckling under the pressure of the calls from tech journalists, financial analysts, large shareholders, customers and probably highly-paid outside consultants, to "play" in the sub-$1,000 market. It should have been blindingly obvious, that this was to be the entry point to a downward death spiral, as the cutthroat-competitive PC market would unendingly undercut each other in price like two gas stations across the street from one another.

The cycle was, HP and Dell entered the sub-$1,000 market and tried to maintain margins by using cheaper components and housing. Customers noticed that these inexpensive PCs now noticeably "creaked" if you lifted the keyboard up by only one side (like Gateway keyboards have always done). The plastic housings of these sub-$1,000 machines now had "give" if you pressed into the side of the plastic housing. They were lighter.

Maximizing margins also meant resorting to cheaper internal components instead of "best-of-breed" components. Customer support was trimmed. Quality control procedures were scaled back to save money and maximize margins. DOA units, reliability and failure issues began to surface as a result, and the prospect of fixing, or worse, replacing a machine under warrantee erased any profit margin, and then some. Sales of these machines suffered as a result and (no turning back -- you're now a charter member of the sub-$1,000 market) in response, the likes of HP and Dell -- again -- lowered prices and maximized margins with even cheaper components and COGS cutbacks. (See where this viscous cycle is going/has gone?)

The recent news articles report that HP had strong unit sales, but paltry margins. HP realized this would only continue, so they bailed while they could still cut their losses.

The above is just as true for Dell. When Dell owned the solid leadership position as the highest selling PC maker, Dell PCs were never the cheapest on the market -- and yet they vastly outsold cheaper computers. Dell once had a classy brand identity and reputation for quality and service and support. Consumers had a choice: do I buy a cheaper PC from a lesser-brand and save, maybe $400, or do I spend a little more to get a Dell?

The results were clear. But, like HP, Dell too succumbed to the pressure to play in the sub-$1,000 market and did exactly what HP did. Dell stepped onto the top of the inevitable death spiral and has suffered and is suffering. My money's not on things turning out well for Dell.

For once, Steve Jobs' obstinacy paid off. He too felt the same intense pressure to enter the sub-$1,000 market and he stubbornly refused. And what a toll that's taken on Apple! (Inherent sarcasm should be obvious.)

I would venture a guess that if you surveyed a large sample of (computer ambivalent -- e.g. I don't belong in such a survey) Mac buyers, asking them why they paid so much more for their Mac than a Windows PC costing half as much or even less, answers might resemble:

"I don't know, I just felt it was worth the extra money to get an Apple. Macs surely cost a lot more than PCs, but when you look at a Mac, you can plainly see it's quality construction, and when you try one out in a store, you notice the care and investment Apple has put into making using their computers an easy and high-quality experience for the user. I think Macs cost more than PCs for a reason, and I think PCs are so much cheaper for a reason, too. I'm wary of 'bargain-basement' priced PCs. I get the feeling that in the long-run, those cheap PCs will wind up costing me a fortune."

The cycle was, HP and Dell entered the sub-$1,000 market and tried to maintain margins by using cheaper components and housing. Customers noticed that these inexpensive PCs now noticeably "creaked" if you lifted the keyboard up by only one side (like Gateway keyboards have always done). The plastic housings of these sub-$1,000 machines now had "give" if you pressed into the side of the plastic housing. They were lighter. Maximizing margins also meant resorting to cheaper internal components instead of "best-of-breed" components. DOA, reliability and failure issues began to surface as a result, and the prospect of replacing or fixing a machine under warrantee erased any profit margin, and then some. Sales of these machines suffered as a result and (no turning back -- you're a player in the sub-$1,000 market) in response, the likes of HP and Dell lowered prices and maximized margins with even cheaper components. (See where this viscous cycle is going/has gone?)

Prices are so low, my neighbors treated their dirt-cheap PC like a disposable razor when it died recently, and they just went out and bought a new (probably even cheaper).

The recent news articles report that HP had strong unit sales, but paltry margins. HP realized this would only continue, so they bailed while they could still cut their losses.

The above is just as true for Dell. When Dell owned the solid leadership position as the highest selling PC maker, Dell PCs were never the cheapest on the market -- and yet they outsold cheaper computers. Dell once had a classy brand identity and reputation for quality and service. Consumers had a choice: do I buy a cheaper PC from a lesser-brand and save, maybe $400, or do I spend a little more to get a Dell?

The results were clear. But, like HP, Dell too succumbed to the pressure to play in the sub-$1,000 market and did exactly what HP did. Dell stepped onto the top of the inevitable death spiral and has suffered and is suffering. My money's not on things turning out for Dell.

When I saw at my local Wal*Mart a wooden pallet on the sales floor piled with brown Dell boxes, and with a sign taped to it reading, "Sale -- complete Dell desktop PC with Windows 7 Home Edition, including 19" flat screen LCD display, only $599”," I knew it was over.

(BTW, next to the pallet of Dells was a towering floor display of 24-pack generic paper towels.)

What environment reflects better on the product and brand: that described above, or in an Apple Store in the Louvre? (Or 5th Ave., NYC, or Grand Central Terminal? Or any Apple Store.)

I know, I know, Wal*Mart is by far the largest retail distribution channel on the planet and sooooo attractive to any product maker, but at what cost? You have no control over how their many, many stores present your product, in addition to Wal*Mart's reputation as a deep-discounter of cheap products rub off on your brand. (And once the toothpaste is out of the tube....) Once Dell's sterling image was indelibly tarnished, you can go back to being a premium computer maker. But they'd still have that lofty reputation if they fought off temptation and stuck to quality that used to make consumers want to pay "a little more for a Dell."

As Marshall McLuhan famously said, "The medium is the message."

That's why you can buy Timex watches at Wal*Mart but not Rolexes. (And why Rolex doesn't compete in Timex's space.)

As a parallel example from yesteryear, after the late 70's gas shortages, and the attendant explosion in the manufacturing and sales of compact cars, GM buckled to pressure to offer a low-cost, compact, fuel-efficient Cadillac model called the Cimarron. Logic says that people would jump at the chance to own a Cadillac, a car line they expected never to be able to afford in their lifetimes! But consumer behavior has no regard for logic. To consumers, a Cadillac was an enormous, expensive, premium, gas-guzzling status symbol. An affordable compact model like the Cimarron was a Cadillac in a titular sense only.

But was this borne out by the numbers? Boy howdy!

Perhaps desperate to avoid admitting a mistake and cutting their losses early, GM spent profligate amounts of money to market this "Edsel" for 7 years! SEVEN!

In all, GM manufactured a total of 132,499 Cadillac Cimarrons -- that's manufactured, not sold.

So for once, Steve Jobs' obstinance has paid off. He too felt the intense pressure from all quarters to enter the sub-$1,000 personal computer market, and he stubbornly refused. And what a toll it's taken on Apple! (The sarcasm should be obvious.)

Last I heard, Apple had 91% share of the market for above-$1,000 computers. Good economy/bad economy, there are enough consumers left who suspect that fire sale-priced PC desktops or notebooks might prove a quality control nightmare, costing them hours on the phone (including after the toll-free, free tech support period has ended) and prove in the long run to be far more expensive than it was at the cash register.

Consumers prize quality and are willing to pay for it. They know the difference between price and value. The top-selling iPad 2 is the highest priced, top-of-the-line, 64GB, 3G model.

By Apple "iPod-ing" the personal computer market with the Mac (like they iPod-ed the Tablet market -- a term I predict will soon become obsolete as "there is only the iPad"), it does not follow that I mean Apple should fill the vacuum HP has left by selling Macs in that suicidal price category.

I mean that with a MAJOR player suddenly off the field, what a perfect time to step up Mac marketing with a complete campaign including television ads (and mention of its ability to run Windows).

Quote:
Remember, Apple cares more about margin than volume. With iPad, they have both, but with the iPhone and Mac markets they seem content to let others bottom feed while they take the more lucrative premium segment.

The bottom-feeders part is true, especially since it seems to be suicide, but IMHO, Apple cares as much about volume as margin. If you ask Windows/Mac ISVs who offer only some of their apps for the Mac what Apple could do to incentives them to develop for the Mac more, they probably won't say, "Make the SDK more approachable and easier to use," they'll say, "Sell more Macs."

Back when the Cell-chip based Playstation was introduced, developers quickly found out it was a BEAR to program for. But development for the console flourished when unit sales rocketed. Easy to program for/hard to program for, installed base trumpt all other concerns.

If Apple sells more units, more software will be developed for it, and with a broad choice of quality software available for the Mac, Apple will in turn sell more units, prompting more software development and increasing unit sales, prompting more software--well, you get the picture...

Spending a lot on product development, from costly materials, industrial design, the finest components, (engineers whose sole job is to study the weight of the base of Apple notebooks versus the lid/display so that when you open the laptop on a flat surface, the base doesn't flip up -- try that on most any Wintel notebook. I should mention that this team did not succeed in this goal with the MacBook Air, whose base flips up when you open the lid and slams back down or you have to pry the base down), the most extensive thermal dynamics engineering in the computer industry, teams devoted entirely to power management for rechargeable Apple products, and on, and on, is not money wasted. In countless ways, when a consumer has one of these Apple products in hand, the care and expense Apple went to, does not go unnoticed. It increases brand image and goodwill, and in turn, long-term brand-loyalty.

If Apple had lower margins, such lengths and expense of developing products that reflect so well on the company (increasing brand-loyalty and sales for as far as the eye can see) would not be possible -- and Apple would not be the most valuable company in the U.S. now. ("What recession?")

Apple should aggressively market the Mac. This was true before the HP news.

There is no justifiable reason for not doing so (like, "We can't afford it."), except that an atmosphere has swept through every part of Apple that says the Mac should be sunsetted proactively by Apple as opposed to letting the consumer and marketplace decide.

I firmly believe Steve Jobs wants the Mac gone and is working incrementally to hasten the process. With this prevailing attitude, allocating company resources to the Mac or (Mac) OS X does not make sense. I believe all further changes to OS X ("Mac" is officially out of its title -- "Oh, but this is a harmless, meaningless detail that portends nothing.") will be, shall we say, "iOSing" the Mac UI so that when the Mac is killed, we Mac-devotees, who in the past have been known to make made noise over issues involving the Mac, will hardly notice the change. We'll be so brainwashed; "What Mac?"

The only Mac in the entire line Steve likes is the MacBook Air. The next edition may not contain "Mac" in its name, and the next MacBook Pros will probably not have integrated optical drives, or even a BTO option for one.

I hope I am wrong. I love my iPad 2. I love my iPhone and will love the iPhone 5 and iPad 3 -- Oh! And I love my iPod nano for when the iPhone is too big for the circumstances (running).

And I love my Mac Pro.

They need not have to replace each other. I'll own an iPad, iPhone AND the top-of-the-line Mac Pro for as long as Apple sells them. While there is overlap, they all serve different and unique functions, and I need them all.

I should think such lack of "cannibalization" should be music to their ears, and they won't pull the plug on the Mac.

I'd be elated to be wrong.


post #108 of 111
Does anyone think it likely that Apple will produce another type of computer [different from the current product line] and name it some other type of apple within the next 3 years?
post #109 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by geneking7320 View Post

Does anyone think it likely that Apple will produce another type of computer [different from the current product line] and name it some other type of apple within the next 3 years?

What do you mean "some other type of apple?' Like Granny Smith?

I'm more inclined to think they will bring back the MacBook line. Maybe have the current MacBook Pro design with the big clunky chassis and optical disc drive being called the new MacBook with the new taper svelte deisgn vis-Ã*-vis the MacBook Air, but larger than the MacBook Air, be the new MacBook Pro.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #110 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by geneking7320 View Post

Does anyone think it likely that Apple will produce another type of computer [different from the current product line] and name it some other type of apple within the next 3 years?

Not at all, no.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

What do you mean "some other type of apple?' Like Granny Smith?

That'd go over well. GranBook, iGran, Gran Mini…

New string of commercials… two geriatrics, one in a 30s-style suit, one in an Elvis getup: "Hello, I'm a Gran." "And I want soup!"

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply

Originally Posted by helia

I can break your arm if I apply enough force, but in normal handshaking this won't happen ever.
Reply
post #111 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Not at all, no.



That'd go over well. GranBook, iGran, Gran Mini

New string of commercials two geriatrics, one in a 30s-style suit, one in an Elvis getup: "Hello, I'm a Gran." "And I want soup!"

Seriously, I can imagine something eclipsing the Mac in the not too distant future.
What type of apple could you call it?
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