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Verizon's Android share down dramatically following iPhone 4 launch

post #1 of 69
Thread Starter 
In less than six months, Verizon Wireless' share of Android phones sold in the US has eroded from 51.4 percent to 41.1 percent, indicating a huge shift among Verizon subscribers to iPhone 4.

A breakdown of US Android providers published by Chitika Insights at the end of March showed Verizon to be the largest Android carrier, largely due to that carrier's migration from RIM Blackberry to Droid branded Android smartphones throughout 2010.

A new study by Chitika, looking a the same market just five months later, shows a huge decrease in Verizon's slice of the US Android pie after it launched iPhone 4.

Despite a new wave of promotion of Android devices, AT&T's share of Android users is up just 5 percentage points. Figures by T-Mobile and Sprint indicate both have maintained a static ratio of the nation's Android users as Verizon moved millions of its subscribers to the iPhone.

The largest growth comes from other carriers, including MetroPCS, Virgin andUS Cellular, who amounted to less than 3 percent of the US Android market in March, but now collectively claim 8.5 percent, nearly as large of a share as AT&T.



Chitika estimates that Verizon carries about 23.9 percent of American iPhones, leaving AT&T with 76.1 percent.

The company noted, "Verizons share of iPhone traffic continues to increase, but it seems that Verizon is gaining market share in Apples prominent smartphone at the expense of its other, Android-running devices."
post #2 of 69
Doesn't this really reflect on the growing Android market and it's participants and less on anything to do with the iPhone? In order for it to really reflect on the iPhone your pie chart should just show a comparison of just Verizon before and after it had the iPhone. The charts are really showing that more companies are selling Android devices. Is it also possible that the Other is including things like Tablets and Nooks? I don't think you can make the conclusion that you have from those charts.
post #3 of 69
And many more of us trapped on AT&T are waiting for iphone 5 to switch to verizon!
post #4 of 69
It's really the only phone that actually puts carriers on the map and makes news about them somehow relevant. No other device does that.
post #5 of 69
Another regurgitation of a "research report" by AppleInsider with no critical thinking. As another commented noted, there's no way to use the percentages in those pie graphs to draw the conclusion that Verizon's carrying the iPhone 4 caused the reduction in Verizon's share of the Android handset market or that its customers shifted from Android to iPhone. +1 for Bruce.
post #6 of 69
I'm part of the 23% of iPhones on Verizon. But i'm surprised that ATT has such a little android %. What the hell are they selling other than iPhone? It's crazy to think that 92% of ATT's smartphone users are iPhone, or is it?
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post #7 of 69
Does anyone remember before Verizon got the iPhone... people said it would be stupid for Apple to make a Verizon iPhone because CDMA is a dead end?

I think people thought Verizon was gonna shut off CDMA sometime soon... and Verizon iPhone users would have a phone that didn't work anymore...

Fast forward to today... Apple DID put an iPhone on Verizon.... and there is no end to CDMA in sight. In fact... all Verizon phones still rely on CDMA for voice... and they will for a long time.

It's funny how topics change from day to day.
post #8 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Atkinson View Post

Is it also possible that the Other is including things like Tablets and Nooks? I don't think you can make the conclusion that you have from those charts.

The article states that Other is other mobile operators (they even list a few).

The whole thing is focused on smartphones. If for some reason they had junior high school students tabulated the data and forgotten how to exclude non-smartphone Android devices, they would probably be fairly evenly distributed amongst all the carriers. That said, I'm going to give Chitika the benefit of the doubt and pretend like they actually know the difference between smartphones and things like tablets and that they know how to isolate the smartphone data.

Remember that Chitika is a web advertising firm, so its observations are largely restricted to data collected as people view ads served by that network. If certain devices and/or platforms have more access to ad-supported websites or apps, these numbers might be skewed.

Your point about Android's growth is well posited though.

All in all, I'm not sure if Chitika's report is worth a damn.
post #9 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Atkinson View Post

Doesn't this really reflect on the growing Android market and it's participants and less on anything to do with the iPhone? In order for it to really reflect on the iPhone your pie chart should just show a comparison of just Verizon before and after it had the iPhone. The charts are really showing that more companies are selling Android devices. Is it also possible that the Other is including things like Tablets and Nooks? I don't think you can make the conclusion that you have from those charts.

The charts show that Verizon has almost 25% of the U.S. iPhone market. Where do you think those customers are coming from (at the same time their Android share is declining). Yes, some from at&t but those numbers show me a story similar to what's posted .... just connect the dots.
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post #10 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


Chitika estimates that Verizon carries about 23.9 percent of American iPhones, leaving AT&T with 76.1 percent.

This doesn't make any sense. Last month, Verizon reported sales of 2.3 million iphone4. Let's say there are currently 4 million iphone4 owners in Verizon. Would that mean that AT&T only has around 12 million iphone owners ? that's not likely because AT&T announced selling 4 million iphone sales last quarter alone.

The story about verizon's Android marketshare also doesn't make any sense.
post #11 of 69
The only definite thing I take from this article is that the total percentage of Android phones on all US carriers is 100%. The rest of the comparison is meaningless. Did Verizon's actual number of units sold fall? From reading this article, who knows? The result is probably the effect of small carriers now selling Android phones as much, if not more, than the Verizon iPhone.
post #12 of 69
It almost doesn't matter how flawed the original study is, because Daniel skews it so much it's laughable.

He claims that Verizon share going down 10% is "huge", but AT&T growing 5% is "just" a small increase.

C'mon, dude, the difference between 5% and 10% just isn't as great as you portray.
post #13 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

In less than six months, Verizon Wireless' share of Android phones sold in the US has eroded from 51.4 percent to 41.1 percent, indicating a huge shift among Verizon subscribers to iPhone 4.

How does it follow that VZ customers are switching to the iPhone?

Other possibilities include VZ's total sales being down, or non-iP VZ sales going up, or other carriers selling lots of Android while VZ's Android sales are flat or even higher.

I think DED needs lessons in basic logic. He does not have enough information, and makes assumptions not supported by facts.

He may be correct, but he has scant evidence and many assumptions.
post #14 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

I'm part of the 23% of iPhones on Verizon. But i'm surprised that ATT has such a little android %. What the hell are they selling other than iPhone? It's crazy to think that 92% of ATT's smartphone users are iPhone, or is it?

Yeah, I was thinking the same. T-Mobile has twice the marketshare of Android as AT&T? Pretty astonishing. Maybe T-Mobile should buy AT&T.

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post #15 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Fast forward to today... Apple DID put an iPhone on Verizon.... and there is no end to CDMA in sight. In fact... all Verizon phones still rely on CDMA for voice... and they will for a long time.

.



Can you surf the 'web while you are on the iPhone?
post #16 of 69
"Down dramatically"... ah a fresh DED article. How's it hanging?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #17 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

The charts show that Verizon has almost 25% of the U.S. iPhone market. Where do you think those customers are coming from (at the same time their Android share is declining). Yes, some from at&t but those numbers show me a story similar to what's posted .... just connect the dots.

There is not enough information to do anything other than hazard a WAG. That is not responsible journalism.
post #18 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Does anyone remember before Verizon got the iPhone... people said it would be stupid for Apple to make a Verizon iPhone because CDMA is a dead end?

I think people thought Verizon was gonna shut off CDMA sometime soon... and Verizon iPhone users would have a phone that didn't work anymore...

Fast forward to today... Apple DID put an iPhone on Verizon.... and there is no end to CDMA in sight. In fact... all Verizon phones still rely on CDMA for voice... and they will for a long time.

It's funny how topics change from day to day.

I have no idea why CDMA hangs on to dear life. I thought GSM had won the cola wars, quite decisively. Of course, so did the metric system, and Americans couldn't care less about that

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #19 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

Can you surf the 'web while you are on the iPhone?

Nope... but you never could on CDMA. No surprises there!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I have no idea why CDMA hangs on to dear life. I thought GSM had won the cola wars, quite decisively. Of course, so did the metric system, and Americans couldn't care less about that

Yeah.... I have no idea why Verizon and Sprint chose CDMA all those years ago. But they did... and it was far too costly to switch.

However... hopefully someday everything will be LTE... which is GSM based.
post #20 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Does anyone remember before Verizon got the iPhone... people said it would be stupid for Apple to make a Verizon iPhone because CDMA is a dead end?

I think people thought Verizon was gonna shut off CDMA sometime soon... and Verizon iPhone users would have a phone that didn't work anymore...

Fast forward to today... Apple DID put an iPhone on Verizon.... and there is no end to CDMA in sight. In fact... all Verizon phones still rely on CDMA for voice... and they will for a long time.

It's funny how topics change from day to day.

I still think CDMA is a dead end, hasn't changed my opinion one bit. It is slow and can't handle simultaneous voice/data. More shows that Americans have been suffering for so long with paltry mobile technology that they know no better.
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post #21 of 69
Down 10% of (make up a number) 2 million = down 200,000 units

Up 5% of 100 million = up 5 million units

Insufficient data in the story to make great comparisons between the carriers unless you know the starting points. However, you could make an educated guess about the patterns inside a single carrier.
post #22 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by cy_starkman View Post

I still think CDMA is a dead end, hasn't changed my opinion one bit. It is slow and can't handle simultaneous voice/data. More shows that Americans have been suffering for so long with paltry mobile technology that they know no better.

Right. But the point was that people thought CDMA would be shut off sometime before your current contract is up... rendering your brand new phone unusable.

That's not gonna happen anytime soon.

Remember how long it took to finally turn off the analog towers? Almost a decade.

They gotta give people lots of time to switch to new hardware. And considering we haven't heard a peep about the final day of CDMA... it's safe to say it will be around for a long time.
post #23 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Does anyone remember before Verizon got the iPhone... people said it would be stupid for Apple to make a Verizon iPhone because CDMA is a dead end?

I think people thought Verizon was gonna shut off CDMA sometime soon... and Verizon iPhone users would have a phone that didn't work anymore...

Fast forward to today... Apple DID put an iPhone on Verizon.... and there is no end to CDMA in sight. In fact... all Verizon phones still rely on CDMA for voice... and they will for a long time.

It's funny how topics change from day to day.

I help people set up their computers and phones every day in my business. There is a whole LOAD of users who are Verizon Android users who are now locked into Android, with the apps and the usage patterns, because they couldn't get an iPhone before. Those users are probably, for the most part, lost to Apple. The barriers to change are so high, and get higher with every app purchased.
post #24 of 69
My my my. A sudden rush of wind to counter DED claims based on a web ad network analysis by Chitika Insight. Did anyone, anyone at all read the ACTUAL study cited? No? I thought not.

From the top, childroon: It is an established fact that the smartphone market is growing significantly, at least for the foreseeable future as more and more people who used to just use "feature phones" are starting to use "smartphones". Note the quotes - slippery labels those are and inclined to abuse, so let me be explicit for the more obtuse among you critics of the data. For the intents of my usage here I will assume that any piece of hardware configured primarily to function as a mobile phone device running Android, iOS, WebOS, WinMob/7, Meego, or Symbian are categorically classifiable as "smartphones". But let me narrow the field just a bit. Let's assume for sake of the discussion that all we are concerned about here is just Android "smartphones" and iOS "smartphones". It makes it easier and I'm feeling lazy tonight. The number here are US only numbers of course so any market outside of US carriers is ignored.

Now what was observed by Chitika Insight, whose numbers by the way are used by several "reputable" news sources, including the WSJ, (as reliable indicators of marketshare and growth based on ad hits in their network) was that for shares of total market ad hits for Verizon showed an overall decline in total share of available "smartphone" population on their network of roughly 10% for Android against all other "smartphones" on their network. These percentages DO NOT indicate total numbers, except if you can do the math and extrapolate from their quarterly financials what this means in real numbers. What impact was there during the time period between March 2011 and August 2011 that could have caused a 10% drop in Android's share of "smartphones" on the Verizon network? Well the iPhone was finally offered on Verizon in February 2011. So as contracts came up for renewal (since Verizon didn't offer early release for switchers) it seems that a sizable number of Android users switched to iPhones for renewal during the period from March, when the first review was done, and the recent August review.

It is not the only thing that happened in that time period - T-Mobile reported a loss of 99,000 subscribers to other networks, the HTC Thunderbolt, Moto Droid Bionic and Samsung 4G LTE were released on Verizon, T-Mobile released the Samsung Galaxy Mini and Galaxy S 4G, Sprint released the HTC Arrive, the Evo Shift 4G and the Kyocera Echo. Meanwhile over at ATT, they released the HTC Freestyle and Inspire 4G, along with Moto Atrix 4G. Worldwide (which technically doesn't count for the purposes of the discussion but is interesting nonetheless) the HP Veer and Pre3, the Samsung Galaxy Ace, Fit, Gio and S2, and the lonely but not forgotten Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc. All running the Android OS, excepting the HP Pre and Veer of course.

Naturally Android supporters and DED critics will claim that the numbers are suspect, that Chitika has flawed survey methodologies, or is outright lying, that DED is bending the numbers and reading too much into them. Which is interesting because Chitika also reported that Android users as tracked by their network tend to click ads significantly more than iPhone users. All Chitika, which is an ad network (similar to Google's Adsense), does is watch the hits and report the numbers- - they have no skin in this game, except to generate ad hits. No they no need to flex the numbers or lie about the results.

All they reported was that a percentage of Verizon's "smartphone" population that was using Android declined by 10% or so and DED cited the company's statement of "but it seems that Verizon is gaining market share in Apple’s prominent smartphone at the expense of its other, Android-running devices." That statement was based on earlier finding after the release of the iPhone on Verizon saw steady increases in Verizon's share of the iPhone market against ATT.

No spinning here, no need to twist things around, the numbers are what they are - if you read the source material and can actually understand what is being reported.
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post #25 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post


I help people set up their computers and phones every day in my business. There is a whole LOAD of users who are Verizon Android users who are now locked into Android, with the apps and the usage patterns, because they couldn't get an iPhone before. Those users are probably, for the most part, lost to Apple. The barriers to change are so high, and get higher with every app purchased.

Not to start a fanboy war... but overall do people really buy so many Android apps that it will be expensive to switch?

I've heard the opposite... leaving the Apple eco-system can be expensive.
post #26 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Does anyone remember before Verizon got the iPhone... people said it would be stupid for Apple to make a Verizon iPhone because CDMA is a dead end?

What people?
post #27 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven N. View Post


What people?

Oh a couple years ago... in the comments of every tech-blog.

The overall consensus was that it would be stupid for Apple to make a special iPhone for one carrier... a CDMA carrier at that.

But they did.
post #28 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Not to start a fanboy war... but overall do people really buy so many Android apps that it will be expensive to switch?

I've heard the opposite... leaving the Apple eco-system can be expensive.

That's not the opposite. Leaving either ecosystem is expensive and difficult. The expense is the small part, its the difficulty of changing that's far bigger.

Don't underestimate momentum - it is VERY hard to get anyone older than 30 to switch anything to do with technology. Witness how hard Apple has had to work, and for how long, for really pretty small gains in the PC space.
post #29 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacInsider2 View Post

And many more of us trapped on AT&T are waiting for iphone 5 to switch to verizon!

*raises hand*
post #30 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

That's not the opposite. Leaving either ecosystem is expensive and difficult. The expense is the small part, its the difficulty of changing that's far bigger.

Don't underestimate momentum - it is VERY hard to get anyone older than 30 to switch anything to do with technology. Witness how hard Apple has had to work, and for how long, for really pretty small gains in the PC space.

I sorta agree with your overall premise.... except I know dozens of people who are over 40 who all had a Blackberries a year ago. Now they all have Android or iOS. And that's a BIG jump from a QWERTY keyboard to a touchscreen.

It's also difficult to convince someone to buy a Mac instead of a $499 PC.

But Android phones and iPhones cost basically the same with a contract. My point is I don't think people have purchased enough Android apps to keep them on the Android platform. Most of the best Android apps are free anyway.

With iOS... there are also lots of accessories and charging docks/boomboxes.
post #31 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvolino View Post

Another regurgitation of a "research report" by AppleInsider with no critical thinking. As another commented noted, there's no way to use the percentages in those pie graphs to draw the conclusion that Verizon's carrying the iPhone 4 caused the reduction in Verizon's share of the Android handset market or that its customers shifted from Android to iPhone. +1 for Bruce.

You are right that there is no conclusive proof here, but your vastly overstating the case. The conclusion is in fact a reasonable surmise given the other percentages are staying the same, or in the case of AT&T, going up a bit.
post #32 of 69
Oh, please let the iPhone gains on Verizon be the start of a major tipping point of the iPhone being able to defend itself against Android growth. If the iPhone can control at least 35% of market share on every carrier in the U.S. that would be a huge win for Apple and iOS. That much revenue from iPhones per quarter would be tremendous and could really push up Apple's share price over $400.
post #33 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I have no idea why CDMA hangs on to dear life. I thought GSM had won the cola wars, quite decisively. Of course, so did the metric system, and Americans couldn't care less about that

Yes, the backwards and intensely myopic view of the average American is what fuels most of the debates in the "smartphone wars" and contributes to most of the misinformation about what's going on vis a vis iOS and Android.

iOS has been winning every single quarter for four years now and still I see people (Americans) commenting every day about how Android is "vanquishing" iOS or some such BS. They also believe that the fact that iPhone was only available on AT&T for so long was such a huge hairy deal, when in fact the rest of the world couldn't care less and it's really had only a minimal impact on the spread of iOS.

There are many things that are less than a 20 minute ride from the US border that are not dreamt of in their philosophy, and Americans are the least travelled, least "aware of the world" group on the planet. The average American know virtually nothing of their own history, let alone the rest of the world, and still think for the most part that every thing *they* believe is simply what "the world" believes.

Sigh.
post #34 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameronj View Post

That's not the opposite. Leaving either ecosystem is expensive and difficult. The expense is the small part, its the difficulty of changing that's far bigger.

Don't underestimate momentum - it is VERY hard to get anyone older than 30 to switch anything to do with technology. Witness how hard Apple has had to work, and for how long, for really pretty small gains in the PC space.

Yes, but most Android users haven't bought many apps and most Android apps are free.

When you add in the fact that the majority of the paid apps on Android are not only available on iOS, but typically started out on iOS, and that all of the main mot popular apps exist on both platforms, the cost (both monetary and effort) or moving from Android to iOS is almost negligible. It's certainly much lower than the cost of moving the other way.
post #35 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post

All they reported was that a percentage of Verizon's "smartphone" population that was using Android declined by 10% or so and DED cited the company's statement of "but it seems that Verizon is gaining market share in Apple’s prominent smartphone at the expense of its other, Android-running devices." That statement was based on earlier finding after the release of the iPhone on Verizon saw steady increases in Verizon's share of the iPhone market against ATT.

No spinning here, no need to twist things around, the numbers are what they are - if you read the source material and can actually understand what is being reported.

I read the source material and it doesn't actually say what you or DED are implying.

It isn't a 10% decline in the number Android phones on the Verizon network.

What the report is saying is the number of Verizon customers with Android phones did not grow as fast as the number of Android phones on other carriers. Verizon's percentage share of the total Android market is down but you need to remember that the market has grown larger.

Think of it as saying there were 51 Android Phones on Verizon and 49 phones on other networks in March. Now there are 82 Android phones on Verizon but 118 on the other networks. Verizon's percentage of the total has dropped 10% despite having more phones.

Similarly AT&T is up 5 percentage points, but that doesn't mean that the iPhone is down. AT&T are simply selling more smartphones in total (both iPhones and Android).
post #36 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post

Not to start a fanboy war... but overall do people really buy so many Android apps that it will be expensive to switch?

I've heard the opposite... leaving the Apple eco-system can be expensive.

Yeah I own an android phone and tablet have purchased a total of five apps. I don't buy games I got gameboid for that. I own two keyboards (one for phones and the other for tablets.) and a forum app. And an app I made a mistake of buying. Over all I only invested 20$ in apps.

The main thing that stands in the way of people switching is how use they are to their phones. Majority of android buyers are old feature phone users so for them android was their first smart phone os. One thing that is a fact about Americans that when they get used to something they seldom want to change. I went to the iphone for a week and it is just too different then android. It took me ten minutes to get a picture that was mms to me onto dropbox. I had no idea what to do. I was use to the Android "way"of selecting the photo and tapping share and the list of apps would show up. I assumed the iphone would have had that native. That's the hurdle that goes with that. And it goes both ways people complain that the Android browser zooms in to much. Hell this is why I am not surprised the return rate for the virizon iphone is higher ten the at&T model.
post #37 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple v. Samsung View Post

Yeah I own an android phone and tablet have purchased a total of five apps. I don't buy games I got gameboid for that. I own two keyboards (one for phones and the other for tablets.) and a forum app. And an app I made a mistake of buying. Over all I only invested 20$ in apps.

The main thing that stands in the way of people switching is how use they are to their phones. Majority of android buyers are old feature phone users so for them android was their first smart phone os. One thing that is a fact about Americans that when they get used to something they seldom want to change. I went to the iphone for a week and it is just too different then android. It took me ten minutes to get a picture that was mms to me onto dropbox. I had no idea what to do. I was use to the Android "way"of selecting the photo and tapping share and the list of apps would show up. I assumed the iphone would have had that native. That's the hurdle that goes with that. And it goes both ways people complain that the Android browser zooms in to much. Hell this is why I am not surprised the return rate for the virizon iphone is higher ten the at&T model.

Like I said in another comment... I know dozens of folks in their 40's and 50's who have used Blackberries for years.

Now they use iPhones and Android phones.

It's not that difficult to learn...

Going from a flip-phone to an Android or iPhone would be huge... going from Android to iOS or vice-versa wouldn't be difficult.
post #38 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple v. Samsung View Post

I only invested 20$ in apps.

Invested? What wat the APR of return?
post #39 of 69
This is a clear example of statistics used poorly. You cannot draw the conclusions made in the article from the statistics given in the article. Lies, damn lies, and statistics!

We need some absolute numbers...
post #40 of 69
Forget the statistical and logical fallacies...

This is the worst pie chart I've ever laid eyes on.

-Verizon is first represented by at&t's brand color, orange. Then it SWITCHES to purple.
-T-Mobile is initially purple. Then it switches to red (Verizon's brand color) despite being purchased by at&t.
-MetroPCS is present in the first pie chart but not in the second chart.
-Sprint is the bright green of Android
-"Other" is its own category in the second chart, but the first chart features MetroPCS, Virgin, and US Cellular separately.

What a clusterf***. You'd think a huge Apple fan would know something about user experience.
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