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New Apple chief Tim Cook regarded as operational genius

post #1 of 59
Thread Starter 
Apple's newly-appointed CEO Tim Cook has been praised as an operations mastermind who, despite lacking Steve Jobs' charisma and vision, can keep the company's momentum going long after receiving the reins.

Jobs announced his resignation in a letter, which came alongside the news that Cook had been named Apple's new CEO on Wednesday evening, as per the company's succession plan.

The Board has complete confidence that Tim is the right person to be our next CEO, Genentech Chairman Art Levinson said on behalf of Apple's Board. Tims 13 years of service to Apple have been marked by outstanding performance, and he has demonstrated remarkable talent and sound judgment in everything he does.

Apple's Board granted Jobs' request to serve as "Chairman of the Board, director and Apple employee," with Levinson noting that Jobs will "continue to serve Apple with his unique insights, creativity and inspiration.

Born and raised in Alabama, Cook attended Auburn University, where he earned a Bachelor's degree in Industrial Engineering. He then went to business school at Duke University, receiving his M.B.A. in 1988. Cook came to Apple in 1998 after a short stint at Compaq, but the bulk of his experience, which Jobs has called a "rare combination," comes from the 12 years he spent at IBM, where he served as director of North American fulfillment.

Jobs hired Cook from relative obscurity, after reportedly being impressed by his "unflappable demeanor," according to a recruiter present at an early meeting between the two. "Steve is very focused on people he can connect to emotionally," the source said.

That meeting has been described by Cook as a monumental life-changing opportunity. "My most significant discovery so far in my life was the result of one single decision, my decision to join Apple," he said during a speech at his alma mater last year. "Working at Apple was never in any plan that I outlined for myself, but was without a doubt the best decision that I ever made."

Cook went on to overhaul Apple's operations, transforming them into a smooth and efficient supply chain. Apple's competitors have been left scrambling to match its pricing for products such as the iPad and MacBook Air that have benefitted from Cook's operational expertise.

As late as 2008, Cook maintained that Jobs would outlast him at Apple. "Come on, replace Steve? No. He's irreplaceable," he said, according to Fortune Magazine. "That's something people have to get over. I see Steve there with gray hair in his 70s, long after I'm retired."

But, Cook has been steadily groomed to take over for Jobs. He served as interim CEO in 2009 while Jobs underwent liver transplant surgery. The 50-year-old executive earned $59 million for his "outstanding performance" while filling in for Jobs.



In January of this year, Jobs took another medical leave, again appointing Cook to run Apple's day to day operations. That leave had continued for eight months until Jobs resigned on Wednesday.

Cook has tended to keep a low profile, having been described as carrying the "courtly demeanor of a Southern gentleman," a contrast from Jobs, who is known for his mercurial temper. He is also said to survive on "an endless series of energy bars," taking pride on being the first one to arrive in the office and the last one out.
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His own dad has described him as an extremely determined worker. "He's the kind of fellow that doesn't believe in giving up on nothing. He's a go-getter. He's a workaholic," he said. "Anything he started he finished. No matter what it was. If he got in it, he finished it."

But, despite his rise to the top of one of the world's most valuable companies, Cook has remembered his roots. "He calls every Sunday, no matter what, no matter where he's at," his dad said. "Europe, Asia no matter where he's at, he calls his Mother every Sunday. He don't miss a one."

In spite of Jobs' resignation, Motley Fool Senior Technology Analyst Eric Bleeker remains "extremely bullish on Apple." According to him, what Cook lacks in terms of innovation and design, he makes up for with his expertise in execution and operations.

"You have to think of the top level of Apple as a triumvirate," Bleeker told AppleInsider. "Cook as the operational mind, Jonathan Ive as the design leadAnd then you've also got Phil Schiller who commands the marketing wing.

"Cook's going to be the leader, but he's going to lean heavily on these guys. They've had a couple dry runs already, they're going to be able to work together," he continued.

Cook, Jobs & Schiller in 2009 | Source: Getty Images.

The analyst went on to note that Cook may not have the extraordinary vision that Jobs is known for, but he expects the newly-minted CEO to excel at "driving the company and continuing to execute."

Shares of Apple were down 5 percent in after-hours trading on Wednesday evening, but Bleeker said any short-term drop would represent "a definite buying opportunity" for investors. Apple is "going to be able to keep the momentum going," he added.
post #2 of 59
I see Cook as having been to Steve what Steve was to Woz.

Woz was the guy with the ideas, but he didn't want to market them. Steve saw the potential and took over all the business-y stuff at Apple's inception so that Woz could keep doing what he loved. Steve eventually fell into the process of creation and got muscled out by the board.

When Steve came back, he had become engrossed in the process of creation but went for C.E.O. for the protection against being ousted again. Since a C.E.O.'s supposed to be more business-y than Steve wanted to be anymore, he found Cook, who became for him what Steve had been to Woz.

Definitely Cook's going to do well as C.E.O. He's not Steve, but he doesn't need to be.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #3 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

He's not Steve,

So who is taking over as COO?

Hopefully, it will be somebody who can execute better than Tim, who has been plagued by shortages and late deliveries.
post #4 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

So who is taking over as COO?

Hopefully, it will be somebody who can execute better than Tim, who has been plagued by shortages and late deliveries.

Fuck... you just couldn't wait, could you.

Ignore.
na na na na na...
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na na na na na...
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post #5 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post


So who is taking over as COO?

I think it will be Jeff Williams
post #6 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

Hopefully, it will be somebody who can execute better than Tim, who has been plagued by shortages and late deliveries.



For someone named "Apple Lover", you sure hate Apple.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #7 of 59

CNN: Obamacare largest tax increase in American history

 

FORBES: ObamaCare's 7 Tax Hikes On Middle class

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CNN: Obamacare largest tax increase in American history

 

FORBES: ObamaCare's 7 Tax Hikes On Middle class

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post #8 of 59
I look forward very much to:

° Steve's improving health

° Tim Cook as CEO of Apple

° Apple continuing to lead the pack.

In my estimation, Tim Cook is a fabulous individual and find for Apple.

All the best.
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #9 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

Fuck... you just couldn't wait, could you.

Ignore.

My ignore list is growing too. \

Here's to Steve and improving health!

(Couldn't quote the original poster - he's on my ignore list!)
Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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Where are we on the curve? We'll know once it goes asymptotic!
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post #10 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I see Cook as having been to Steve what Steve was to Woz.

Woz was the guy with the ideas, but he didn't want to market them. Steve saw the potential and took over all the business-y stuff at Apple's inception so that Woz could keep doing what he loved. Steve eventually fell into the process of creation and got muscled out by the board.

When Steve came back, he had become engrossed in the process of creation but went for C.E.O. for the protection against being ousted again. Since a C.E.O.'s supposed to be more business-y than Steve wanted to be anymore, he found Cook, who became for him what Steve had been to Woz.

Definitely Cook's going to do well as C.E.O. He's not Steve, but he doesn't need to be.

Yeah, Woz was the tech visionary, and Jobs was the marketplace visionary.

From the first Apple ][ with molded [expensive] plastic case, rounded corners, originally no ventilation slots, no noisy fan -- it was the plug-and-play of its time.

I designed my computer room around the Apple ][.

Here's an ad from 1978 that still holds today:

"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #11 of 59
Cook is an operations genius, apparently. But he doesn't have the charisma and vision and panache to broker the deals that SJ did for Apple.

I imagine things getting a little tougher on this front for Apple, but otherwise, they have plenty of momentum and a solid culture to run with far into the future.

I hope the best for SJ and was saddened by the news. What a legend.
post #12 of 59
I feel like putting on sad music and opening a bottle of scotch now \

Thanks for the awesome ride Steve, all the best in the future mate.
post #13 of 59
If you look at how Apple has operated since its initial success with the iPod, it has been an operations play. The way they monopolise components, the way they've reduced costs and grown margins, the way they set the bar on quality so high it locks out competitors looking to move into Apple-defined categories (i.e., multitouch tablets, 'ultrabooks'), etc. That's Cook. They really have an operations strategy for growth. Jobs has the vision, Cook executes. I think the Mac, iPhone, iPad, etc, are in safe hands going forward.
post #14 of 59
AAPL will be $500 or more by 01/30/13.
post #15 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

Cook is an operations genius, apparently. But he doesn't have the charisma and vision and panache to broker the deals that SJ did for Apple.

I imagine things getting a little tougher on this front for Apple, but otherwise, they have plenty of momentum and a solid culture to run with far into the future.

I hope the best for SJ and was saddened by the news. What a legend.

Are you serious? From what I've read, Cook was THE GUY who negotiated Apple's impressive supply chain deals with their vendors. This supply chain dominance is negatively impacting several of Apple's major competitors, in that Apple has locked down the market on the best flash memory, tablet displays, etc.
post #16 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCJ001 View Post

AAPL will be $500 or more by 01/30/13.

Got the year wrong.... 2012.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

I see Cook as having been to Steve what Steve was to Woz.

Woz was the guy with the ideas, but he didn't want to market them. Steve saw the potential and took over all the business-y stuff at Apple's inception so that Woz could keep doing what he loved. Steve eventually fell into the process of creation and got muscled out by the board.

Was Woz really an idea guy? What product idea did he have? He was (is?) a very good engineer. After all, he nearly single-handedly designed and built the original Apple II. But, by then, there was nothing original about the concept of a home computer.

Please do not see this as a slight of Woz. I am never designed anything with the impact of his Apple computer. But in his track record, I see a really good electrical engineer and not a product visionary by any stretch of the imagination.
post #18 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

So who is taking over as COO?

Hopefully, it will be somebody who can execute better than Tim, who has been plagued by shortages and late deliveries.

Interesting perspective. Apple is selling so fast that manufacturing cannot keep up. Is that really the fault of the operations guy? I see the cause as two-fold - the *marketing* department under-estimated demand; and the world's manufacturing capacity has never been asked to meet such a demand.

Someone who can execute than Tim? The iPad is the fastest selling consumer product ever. There is no history of someone with a better track record, is there?
post #19 of 59
Does this mean we have more keynotes to look forward to with the electrifying Phil Schiller ... he has about as much charisma as a turnip. He can take exciting news and make it sound dull and odd at the same time ...
post #20 of 59
I plan to see Tim at the Mother Ship.
An Apple man since 1977
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An Apple man since 1977
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post #21 of 59
Wow, now in retrospect, everything Apple does is carefully calculated...

Specifically, Steve Jobs appears at City Hall about the new Apple campus... then the Biograph is set for the holiday season... with some speculation about Jobs health... then the timely leak about iPhone 5 and 4s.. Then rumor about Sprint and T-Mobile going to sell iPhone... now the bad news. I'll bet by the end of the week we will see invitations for the iPhone 5 event... then we'll see Jobs on stage.
post #22 of 59
Steve didn't have any reason to pick today to submit this resignation - essentially, he's been acting in the capacity for the last year that he will be acting in going forward. So why now to do this?

My bet is that he waited until the lineup for the iP5 launch was all hammered out. I don't think the rumors about TMo and Sprint are unrelated to the timing of this resignation. I think there will be enough great news for the company in the next month to (attempt to) make the stock market forget about the bad news today.

Edit: Whoa... me and the above poster are on the same page, big time.
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

Was Woz really an idea guy? What product idea did he have? He was (is?) a very good engineer. After all, he nearly single-handedly designed and built the original Apple II. But, by then, there was nothing original about the concept of a home computer.

Please do not see this as a slight of Woz. I am never designed anything with the impact of his Apple computer. But in his track record, I see a really good electrical engineer and not a product visionary by any stretch of the imagination.

Oh, yeah, I completely get that Woz wasn't looking so much to what things could be as he was thinking, "all this stuff is cool as all get out; let's see what awesome stuff I can make!" He did, however, jam an Apple IIc into a remote control. That was big (in retrospect).

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #24 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleLover2 View Post

So who is taking over as COO?

Hopefully, it will be somebody who can execute better than Tim, who has been plagued by shortages and late deliveries.

I think Tim Cook has executed brilliantly. Considering the demand for the products Apple was creating it is amazing they have done as well as they have. The real concern has to be can Apple keep innovating without Jobs? Is there another revolutionary product as big as the iPod, iPhone and iPad in Apple's future?
post #25 of 59
Added to my iPhoto library. Never to be deleted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FriedLobster View Post

post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Oh, yeah, I completely get that Woz wasn't looking so much to what things could be as he was thinking, "all this stuff is cool as all get out; let's see what awesome stuff I can make!" He did, however, jam an Apple IIc into a remote control. That was big (in retrospect).

Yup. Like I said - a heck of an electrical engineer.
post #27 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drmstix303 View Post

Is that picture real?? Or is it photoshopped?? I'm sorry for my stupidity

http://www.edibleapple.com/heartwarm...ife-from-wwdc/
It's real. And please delete your previous nonsense post.
post #28 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Market_Player View Post

I feel like putting on sad music and opening a bottle of scotch now \

Thanks for the awesome ride Steve, all the best in the future mate.

I feel a need to gather with others to mourn. Let the others belittle us. Today is a time for reflection.
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drmstix303 View Post

Is that picture real?? Or is it photoshopped?? I'm sorry for my stupidity

That photo is legit. It was from the last keynote. It is a major deal because that is the first time anyone has really seen "the softer, loving, family side of Steve". It is also the photo that ramped up this resignation rumor big time. Everyone new it was coming because it was as if he let his guard down. Know now what is happening, you can read it in the photo that he is telling his wife with just a look and actions that he knows this is the last big keynote for him and that he is sad. Keynotes define jobs. Many things do, but when I think of Steve Jobs, I think, brilliant speaker and amazing keynote presentations. He could literally sell dirt as an amazing advancement if he wanted to. That photo, to me, shows that he will miss that "rush" he probably got from those keynotes. He was a rock star in that sense. Cook, I think he will do fantastic, but I worry about his lack of excitement during keynotes. Hrs pretty boring and hell, don't get me started on Schiller. Great guy probably but he makes me feel like I could do his job by his performance on stage.

Sorry for the long post over a simple question.
post #30 of 59
Who makes the calls on whether to move the MacBook line to ARM processors? Really. Would that have been a Jobs chce or by some committee?

Jobs seems to have the "it" factor and balls to make changes regardless of public opinion. Will the Apple team have that going forward? I'm counting on it.
Hard-Core.
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Hard-Core.
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post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Market_Player View Post

I feel like putting on sad music and opening a bottle of scotch now \

Thanks for the awesome ride Steve, all the best in the future mate.

Maybe a virtual minute of silence?
Get a life!
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by winstein2010 View Post

Wow, now in retrospect, everything Apple does is carefully calculated...

Specifically, Steve Jobs appears at City Hall about the new Apple campus... then the Biograph is set for the holiday season... with some speculation about Jobs health... then the timely leak about iPhone 5 and 4s.. Then rumor about Sprint and T-Mobile going to sell iPhone... now the bad news. I'll bet by the end of the week we will see invitations for the iPhone 5 event... then we'll see Jobs on stage.

Seeing Jobs on stage at the next keynote presentation would be the best thing to do to kill this CEO's credibility. Like, Steve's holding his hand, don't worry!
Let's see if Apple is Jobs. I sure hope not
post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by iancass79 View Post

That photo is legit. It was from the last keynote. It is a major deal because that is the first time anyone has really seen "the softer, loving, family side of Steve". It is also the photo that ramped up this resignation rumor big time. Everyone new it was coming because it was as if he let his guard down. Know now what is happening, you can read it in the photo that he is telling his wife with just a look and actions that he knows this is the last big keynote for him and that he is sad. Keynotes define jobs. Many things do, but when I think of Steve Jobs, I think, brilliant speaker and amazing keynote presentations. He could literally sell dirt as an amazing advancement if he wanted to. That photo, to me, shows that he will miss that "rush" he probably got from those keynotes. He was a rock star in that sense. Cook, I think he will do fantastic, but I worry about his lack of excitement during keynotes. Hrs pretty boring and hell, don't get me started on Schiller. Great guy probably but he makes me feel like I could do his job by his performance on stage.

Sorry for the long post over a simple question.

I needed a handkerchief upon reading this. I think I'll play Albinoni's string quartet and read your words again whilst sipping at a great Romanée-Conti 1999.
Sooooo beautifuly put. What a great moment of reflection.


Get a life!
post #34 of 59
Apple will have many years of innovation ahead of it. They have also ignited their competition so we consumers will continue to have exciting products coming for a long time.
post #35 of 59
Great, now you got us worrying about who will replace Tim Cook when the day comes for him to step down as CEO!

Is there no end to this torment?
post #36 of 59
Looking forward to October iPhone event. It will be the second keynote Tim will give as CEO, and the first one was not as good as it could be. I hope he gets plenty of practice and really shines and brings some of his own personality to the stage. To be sure, I expect a slight change from stevenotes, not drastic, but not an imitation either. Tim can't do what jobs did, he needs to find his own style and innovate the presentation in his own unique way.

Perhaps the pre-announce of ios features was Tim's idea and we will know exactly what to expect a few days before the event from now on. Also a lot more teamwork needs to happen, as none of the team know the company inside out like Steve did.

Once again looking forward to seeing Steve in the audience in october and a solid performance from Tim.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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post #37 of 59
Steve Jobs: Earth's Irreplaceable Impresario



As much as I have taken Steve Jobs to task on things I saw differently than he, my heart is broken.

Since I was 12, Steve Jobs has been my personal hero, and will remain so for the rest of my life.

We have enough data now to compare. We've seen the early Apple with Steve Jobs present before being forced out. The Apple where Steve Jobs was uncompromising with Stephen Wozniak on the industrial design of the Apple ][, especially how rounded its corners should be to combat a more intimidating, "squarish," high-tech "boxy" look; his uncompromising stand that it would have a full qwerty keyboard, a color display and bear the colorful Apple logo that was so costly to reproduce on the Apple ]['s plastic housing (housing which Steve fought for weeks over to get the exact shade of beige he wanted. After rejecting dozens of shades, the plastic maker had to create a customized shade, not in their inventory, specifically for Apple -- or, more appropriately, Jobs).

Steve Jobs wanted the Apple ][ to be approachable by non-technical people; you'll never convince me otherwise: the Apple ][ (not even the Apple 1) was the first personal computer and NOT the hobbyists' kit, the all-assembly-required Altair, with its toggle switches as its UI to program it in binary. (But what binary-programing geek would have any use for a qwerty keyboard anyway?) How "personal" is that?!

Apple invented the personal computer.

"The two Steves" wrested technology from the hands of one of society's outermost fringes (Computer Nerds) and made it accessable and less intimidating to "the great unwashed," or as Apple put it, "The rest of us."

(BTW, the multi-colored Apple logo was even costly to reproduce on paper because of Steve Jobs' uncompromising stance on the color bands. Printing technology of the day made it almost impossible to produce such a logo where none of the color bands overlapped, nor could they leave the tiniest sliver of white between them. Mike "Scotty" Scott, the first CEO Apple hired to handle areas of competency they lacked at the time (business), and who was straining to conserve precious capital, was unhappy about the expense and called it "The most expensive bloody logo ever created!")

But Steve Jobs knows just when to be frugal and just when to splurge on things that end up paying for themselves many times over. The color-striped logo served its purpose very well during the zeitgeist of the time. IMHO, it was of high importance to the fledgling Apple's success and garnered this new startup crucial attention, PR and interest. We'll never know, but that simple, bitten, multi-color-striped logo may just have put Apple on the map, and we may not live like we do now if it hadn't been created. We might be all be using CLIs and WordStar v.64.9.2. (Again, Steve Jobs knows just when to splurge.)

We know the Apple with Steve Jobs in its employ that gave us the Macintosh, the mass market personal computer that changed the world (and changed the way all computers now work -- Apple brand or not).

Then, for comparison, we know the Apple after Jobs was forced out by someone who in the end probably should have stuck to selling sugared water.

We remember the Newton, MacTV, Copland, Pink, Taligent, Kaleida, CHRP, PPCP, Mac clones, and an Apple that barely survived by the skin of its teeth only because of loyalists like me and others who continued to purchase Macs after Windows 95 came out as well as the Pentium line, and the time came when we could no longer honestly claim 680x0 Macs were faster; Macs beset with pandemic QA hardware and software issues and sometimes 1 in 3 machines arriving at stores DOA; an OS with underlying software tecnology that had grown completely incoherent; ISVs issuing countless "System Extensions" with zero regard for conflicts with the dozens of other "puzzle pieces" that, upon bootup, paraded across your Mac's screen from right to left, and continued a row above from left to right, from other ISVs; a Mac with an OS that had grown so instable that it crashed an average of once an hour; a Mac with constant modal dialogs popping up saying, "[Application Name] has no more available memory. Please quit other programs or use "Get Info" to allocate more RAM to this application."; and when one app crashed, it took everybody with it, ultimately resulting in a full computer crash, requiring a restart and 10 minutes or longer to boot up.

Our fierce loyalty made us continue to buy these often insufferable Macs and not PCs -- at a time when we had every reason not to stand by the Mac (and even had to absorb being made fun of, sometimes).

We provided precious income, just enough to serve as Apple's sole "life support" affording it the subsistence to experience only a "near-death experience" for the Company, not an actual death. It was a very close-call.

Everyone who helped Apple out with their wallets during the most existential period in its history, give yourselves a well-earned pat on the back: you saved Apple when it was in critical condition. There is no doubt. (Macs once accounted for less than 2% of personal computer unit sales, and even smaller percentage of worldwide sales.) And that survival allowed for the return of Steve Jobs and for the most valuable company in the U.S. or World (depending on the vacillations of the stock market). It is incontrovertible: we played a critical role in Apple's survival which led to the Apple of today.

Then, we have for comparison the Apple after Steve Jobs' return.

In my own opinion, Apple and Steve Jobs are inseparable. Steve Jobs IS Apple, and an Apple without him is not Apple. Apple is not a place, a building, a set of formal incorporating documents, a symbol on the NASDAQ; Apple is an idea -- a spacious, expansive idea that encloses innumerable dazzling and imaginative ideas, rare, in that they begin as impossible "pipe dreams," but traverse the yawning chasm between imagination and reality.

Technologist, futurist, veteran of Xerox's legendary Palo Alto Research Center, or PARC, eventual Apple employee, Alan Kay, wrote a paper in 1968 about a futuristic device he called the "Dynabook." Back then, his paper read like science fiction; today, with the iPad, something previously entertained only in one person's "wild" imagination, has materialized into a real product. The iPad is Kay's "Dynabook" to the nth degree. Only Apple can turn things conjured up and imagined in the mind's eye into things real in this way.

Apple is about challenging "the impossible" like an adversary to assail.

Tim Cook is masterful in his work, but Apple is like no other company, where a well-qualified person can simply step into the CEO position and run the company successfully.

One of Steve Jobs' many gifts is spotting talent, spotting genius, and then managing it in just the right way. Many successful Apple execs, engineers, marketers, etc. are successful only in relation to Steve Jobs and his visionary leadership, management, oversight -- and yes, even his "impossible" demands.

Jonathan Ive was a holdover who survived Steve Jobs' axe when he retook the helm of Apple. But did we know of a "Jony Ive" before Jobs' return? Jobs evokes the best out of talented people, and this gift made him see something special in Ive, who was demoralized and under-appreciated before at Apple, as "left-brain," "bean counter" executives were too risk averse to approve an Ive ID design that deviated too much from the marketplace norm -- "Maybe the marketplace will reject it! It breaks with convention!" But Steve Jobs is an artist. Steve Jobs is an entrepreneur, a rare person where every definition you can find will say that the number one trait of such a person is "risk taking."

Would recently departed Apple (physical) Store chief, Ron Johnson, have produced the astonishing landmarks absent Steve Jobs' visionary involvement? (BTW, this is another perfect example of when Steve Jobs knows just when to spend lavishly -- like the tourist attraction that is the 5th Ave., NYC Apple Store; like the multi-million dollar store at The Louvre in Paris; like the upcoming Apple Store NYC's World famous, historic Grand Central Station, said to cost -- with long-term lease agreements -- $40 million (another judicious Steve Jobs "splurge" that will prove its worth many times over); the breathtaking store in Shanghai, China.

(Compare any Apple Store -- even the minis -- to the dank, strip mall Gateway chain of stores, all of which were forced to close as they were utter flops.)

Not one of these gifted and talented people is an island: they need a Steve Jobs.

Brilliant hardware engineer, Jonathan Rubinstein, served Next incredibly well, and when brought aboard Apple by Jobs, he served Apple brilliantly as head of Mac engineering and then head of the iPod division. But once again, he only performed brilliantly in relation to Steve Jobs, who managed him throughout.

But since Rubinstein left Apple to become Palm's triumphant CEO (and dissing Apple on many an occasion), he drove Palm straight into the dirt. Every Wall Street analyst was practically pleading with investors to sell any Palm shares they might hold because the share price was headed for zero.

Then HP buys Palm with the added bonus of -- Rubinstein!, and he drives HP into the dirt, in my personal opinion. Talk about a one man demolition team! He's like Godzilla! Radioactive!

Does anyone remember articles many years ago, when at a shareholder meeting, an ornery old shareholder demanded to know why Apple didn't have a product to compete with the highly successful Palm PDAs (”PDA," an Apple-invented term and product category)?

Palm did succeed on a steep upward trajectory, which reached a pinnacle -- or more appropriately, a nadir.

Jobs' answer to the question was unprecedented in that the famously secretive CEO publicly discussed a product confined to Apple's "Bat Cave" labs. Jobs answered that Apple had a full, working prototype of a PDA, but decided not to market it because, Jobs said, he predicts that PDAs and cell phones were going to merge, and the market for PDAs would completely dry up. (Saying this at a period of raging success for Palm! If I could find any fault with Jobs, it would be tipping his hand to competitors at what he foresaw.)

No one should be surprised at Steve Jobs' prescience in the above example; it has happened so many times that his prescience has now become a matter of course.

If you charted Palm's success, it would be an almost precise apex: a steep upward line that reaches its pinnacle (nadir), followed by an equally steep downward line. Palm's upward trajectory fooled many a company including Sony, a Palm OS licensee, who witnessed their PDAs go from raging successes to fodder for jam-packed fulfillment warehouses.

Yet again -- not surprisingly -- Steve was spot on. <Yawn>

Brilliant people have flourished at Apple when Steve Jobs was their "impresario."

Yes, absent his visionary leadership, geniuses, brilliant people, such as the many, very brilliant, gifted people, working at Apple all during Steve Jobs' long absence after being forced out, flounder. (The point being, that with many of the greatest minds and most talented people in the entire industry populating Apple after Jobs was forced out, we all know how Apple performed until Jobs' return.)

Tim Cook has been Steve Jobs' "secret weapon" for many years -- years that saw Apple become the most valuable company in the world. Tim Cook is the most unsung hero in American business.

But he is an operational expert, a nuts-and-bolts guy. He makes sure the trains run on time. He spent 12 years at IBM, a company that abandoned the very PC market it created.

Cook has been nothing short of critical to Apple's astonishing success since he was recruited by Jobs. The two were like Lennon/McCartney.

Tim Cook must stay at Apple as CEO. His leaving the company would be a devastating blow second only to Steve Jobs' resignation.

Allegorically, while Steve Jobs has been the "obverse side of a coin always heads up," Cook has been the "reverse side of the coin" and just as much a part of the whole "coin" as Jobs (except the critical role Cook has played at Apple for 13 years has been largely hidden, as "the coin has been tails down" -- but just as the self-effacing Cook prefers).

With his almost preternatural eye for talent, Jobs recruited Cook, a choice that -- as we have witnessed -- could not have been more precise.

But is Tim Cook a creative, imaginative, visionary leader? No.

Apple will continue to turn in impressive quarterly earnings reports. Apple, Inc. will run like a well-oiled machine. Just without the magic, the enchantment, the driven passion, the vision, the foresight, the legendary mystique that captures the imagination and makes an Apple product more than just a product, but one that impacts popular culture and is highly sought after for reasons many buyers are unable to describe in words -- oh, and a product which sometimes changes the world.

post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

a very long saga of modern heroes and their warlord

Any celtic bard ancestor?

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

Reply
post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macs2InfinityAndBeyond View Post

As much as I have taken Steve Jobs to task on things I saw differently than he, my heart is broken.

Since I was 12, Steve Jobs has been my personal hero, and will remain so for the rest of my life.

We have enough data now to compare. We've seen Apple with Steve Jobs present before being forced out. The Apple where Steve Jobs was uncompromising with Stephen Wozniak on the industrial design of the Apple ][, especially how rounded its corners should be to combat an more intimidating, "squarish," high-tech "boxy" look, his uncompromising stand that it would have a full qwerty keyboard, a color display and bear the colorful Apple logo that was costly to reproduce on the Apple]['s plastic housing (which Steve fought for weeks over to get the exact shade of beige he wanted). Jobs wanted the Apple ][ to be approachable by non-technical people; you'll never convince me otherwise: the Apple ][ (not even the Apple 1) was the first personal computer and NOT the hobbyists' kit, the Altair, with its toggle switches to program it in binary. How "personal" is that?!

(BTW, the multi-colored Apple logo was even costly to reproduce on paper because of Steve Jobs' uncompromising stand on the color bands. Printing technology of the day made it almost impossible to produce such a logo where none of the color bands overlapped, nor could they leave the tiniest sliver of white between them. Mike "Scotty" Scott, the first CEO Apple hired to handle areas of competency they lacked at the time (business), and who was trying to conserve capital, was unhappy about the expense and called it "The most expensive bloody logo ever created!" But Jobs knows just when to be frugal and just when to splurge on things that end up paying for themselves many times over. The color-striped logo served its purpose very well during the zeitgeist of the time. IMHO, it was of high importance to the fledgling Apple and garnered this new startup crucial attention, PR and interest. Steve knows when to splurge.)

We know the Apple with Steve Jobs in its employ that gave us the Macintosh, the computer that changed the world.

Then, for comparison, we know the Apple after Jobs was forced out by someone who in the end probably should have stuck to selling sugared water. We remember the Newton, Copland, Taligent, CHRP, Mac clones, and an Apple that survived only by the skin of its teeth.

Then, we have for comparison the Apple after Steve Jobs' return.

In my own opinion, Apple and Steve Jobs are inseparable. Steve Jobs IS Apple, and an Apple without him is not Apple.

Tim Cook is masterful in his work, but Apple is like no other company where a qualified person can simply step into the CEO position and run the company successfully.

One of Steve Jobs' many talents is spotting talent, spotting genius, and then managing it in just the right way. Many successful Apple execs are only successful in relation to Steve Jobs and his management -- and yes, even his "impossible" demands.

Jonathan Ive was a holdover that survived Steve Jobs' axe when he retook the helm of Apple. But did we know of a "Jony Ive" before Jobs' return? Jobs evokes the best out of talented people, and his gift made him see something special in Ive, who was demoralized and underappreciated before.

Would recently departed Apple (physical) Store chief, Ron Johnson, have produced the astonishing landmarks absent Steve Jobs' visionary involvement? (BTW, this is another perfect example of when Steve Jobs knows just when to spend lavishly -- like the tourist attraction that is the 5th Ave., NYC Apple Store; like the multi-million dollar store at The Louvre in Paris; like the upcoming Apple Store in NYC's Grand Central Station; the breathtaking store in Shanghai, China

Not one of these gifted and talented people is an island: they need a Steve Jobs.

Brilliant hardware engineer, Jonathan Rubinstein, served Next incredibly well, and when brought aboard Apple by Jobs, he served Apple brilliantly as head of Mac engineering and then head of the iPod division. But once again, he only performed brilliantly in relation to Steve Jobs, who managed him throughout.

But since Rubinstein left Apple to become Palm's triumphant CEO (and dissing Apple on many an occasion), he drove Palm straight into the dirt. Every Wall Street analyst was practically pleading with investors to sell any Palm shares they might hold because the share price was headed for zero.

Then HP buys Palm with the added bonus! of Rubinstein, and he drives HP into the dirt! Talk about a one man demolition team! He's like Godzilla!

Brilliant people have flourished at Apple when Steve Jobs was their "impresario."

But absent his leadership, brilliant people, like the many, very brilliant people at Apple during Steve Jobs' long absence after being forced out, flounder.

Tim Cook has been Steve Jobs' "secret weapon" for many years -- years that saw Apple become the most valuable company in the world. Tim Cook is the most unsung hero in American business.

But he is an operational expert, a nuts-and-bolts guy. He makes sure the trains run on time. He spent 12 years at IBM, a company that abandoned the very PC market it created.

Cook has been nothing short of critical in Apple's astonishing success since he was recruited by Jobs. The two were like Lennon/McCartney.

But is Tim Cook a creative, imaginative, visionary leader? No.

Apple will continue to turn in impressive quarterly earnings reports. Apple, Inc. will run like a well-oiled machine. Just without the magic, the legendary mystique that captures the imagination and makes an Apple product more than just a product, but one that impacts popular culture and is highly sought after for reasons many buyers are unable to describe in words.


Amazing post, it's sobering and I completely agree. To the people saying 'everyone is replaceable, even SJ'- no- he's not. I can't even think of how many gutsy decisions that Apple made, during which EVERYONE was bitching and moaning that they were out of their mind, only for it to be obvious months/years later that it was absolutely the right decision to take in the big picture. It's clear SJ was behind most of these decisions. Will Apple's new leader have this stubbornness in the face of complete doubt by the rest of the world, and the insight to hold on to that stubbornness? It's an incredible rare quality and is not something that can be attained through experience.
post #40 of 59
Message to Tim,

Please get working on a XMac. There are lots of us that need something between the mini and the Pro that doesn't have a built in screen.
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