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Hurricane Irene prompts weekend shutdown of four NYC Apple Stores

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 
New York City is evacuating 250,000 low-lying coastal areas and closing its subway system over the weekend, prompting Apple to shutdown at least four of its retail stores as well.

City mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered the evacuation and transit shutdown in anticipation of Irene, stating "You only have to look at the weather maps to understand how big this storm is and how unique it is, and its heading basically for us."

The storm has similarly canceled a variety of events over the weekend from Broadway shows to ballgames to concerts and an outdoor film festival at Lincoln Center.

Subways have been shut down out of fears that high winds could rock cars off the tracks when operating above the surface. The transit shutdown would have a major impact on Apple Store employees' commute, and also impede customers' ability to get around in the dense, transit friendly city.

Four Apple Store locations in New York City have confirmed they will be closed for the weekend: SoHo, Staten Island, Upper West Side, West 14th.

Update: Apple has announced on its website that its flagship Fifth Avenue will be closed beginning Saturday, Aug. 27. "We look forward to reopening Monday," the store's page reads. The Fifth Avenue store (pictured below) is not located within the coastal evacuation zone.

post #2 of 44
What exactly is an "outdoor tim festival at Lincoln Center"?? Will Tim Cook be there?

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post #3 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

...The Fifth Avenue store (pictured below) is not located within the costal evacuation zone.

That's not the Fifth Avenue store -- not any more.

I wonder what will happen to the construction though. 120mph can be testing even for finished buildings.
post #4 of 44
Um, yeahhhh. Probably wasn't too smart making stores out of glass.
post #5 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obama View Post

Um, yeahhhh. Probably wasn't too smart making stores out of glass.

Sooooo much username-related topical humor, so little time.

And your post is completely uninformed, but that's another issue.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #6 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Sooooo much username-related topical humor, so little time.

And your post is completely uninformed, but that's another issue.

While glass is indeed lovely, I find it an illogical choice to make walls, ceilings and flights of stairs out of.

I also find it a bizarre choice to make the back of the iPhone 4 out of. And considering how many people are wallking around with cracked iPhones, I would expect a redesign will be forthcoming.

As for being uninformed, we'll see what happens if 70 mph winds hit the city tomorrow.
post #7 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obama View Post

...And considering how many people are wallking around with cracked iPhones...

Or how about you just NOT drop a six hundred dollar device?

I don't get it. Why do you think it's acceptable to treat an iPhone the same way you'd treat a VX5300?

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

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post #8 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Or how about you just NOT drop a six hundred dollar device?

I don't get it. Why do you think it's acceptable to treat an iPhone the same way you'd treat a VX5300?

9/10 of all iPhones that I see are either cracked or put in a disgusting rubber case. Such a pity for the beautiful design.

Most works of art aren't supposed to be handled on daily basis.
post #9 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

9/10 of all iPhones that I see are either cracked or put in a disgusting rubber case. Such a pity for the beautiful design.

And zero of the iPhones I've seen are cracked, dented, smashed, or otherwise damaged.

Quote:
Most works of art aren't supposed to be handled on daily basis.

Most people don't have the manual dexterity of a llama, either.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #10 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

And zero of the iPhones I've seen are cracked, dented, smashed, or otherwise damaged.

So you've NEVER seen a damaged iPhone? Wow! You don't go out much, do you?

How about those ugly bumpers?

Quote:
Most people don't have the manual dexterity of a llama, either.

So you've NEVER dropped anything fragile? Wow! You don't do much, do you?
post #11 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

So you've NEVER seen a damaged iPhone? Wow! You don't go out much, do you?

I just don't live in Let's-see-how-much-damage-we-can-do-to-our-expensive-possessions-ville.

Quote:
So you've NEVER dropped anything fragile? Wow! You don't do much, do you?

If that's not moron-bait, I don't know what is.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #12 of 44
Those stores are safer than my home.
post #13 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

...
If that's not moron-bait, I don't know what is.

Guilty as charged, but I could say the same about your claims. I find it highly unlikely that you don't understand how impractically fragile the iPhone 4 is. Not everyone who drops their phone is clumsy as a llama. It just happens -- and where I live, people walk along hard pavements a lot.
post #14 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDoppio View Post

Guilty as charged, but I could say the same about your claims. I find it highly unlikely that you don't understand how impractically fragile the iPhone 4 is. Not everyone who drops their phone is clumsy as a llama. It just happens -- and where I live, people walk along hard pavements a lot.

Oh, sure, I agree that the iPhone 4 is impractically fragile; I can get where you're getting that. I probably wouldn't trust an iPhone 4 to be dropped more than a single time without some sort of issue and I definitely think they need to go to a LiquidMetal back for the thing.

But people ought to be more careful. You wouldn't be careless with a

I'm trying to think of something else made of glass that people often carry around and it's Oh, you wouldn't drop your diabetes machine. That's something of a poor analogy as an iPhone isn't necessary for you to stay alive, but when a lot of people behave as though they couldn't survive without their cell phones, they ought to be treating their cellphones with the respect you'd give to something life-essential.

Or maybe that's too much of a logical leap.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #15 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

prompting Apple to shutdown at least four of its retail stores

employees' commute

not located within the costal evacuation zone.

As with another post, he already fixed one typo ("tim" festival), but missed others.

The word shutdown is a noun, but shut down is a verb phrase. He gets some right but others wrong within the same article.

Should be employees' commutes

coastal

AI, please do something about this problem. This is basic journalism.
post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obama View Post

Um, yeahhhh. Probably wasn't too smart making stores out of glass.

Well, you think that there are 57 states and you also think that Austrian is a language, so what do you know?
post #17 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

New York City is evacuating 250,000 low-lying coastal areas closing

NYC has more than 250,000 areas let alone that many low-lying areas?
post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obama View Post

Um, yeahhhh. Probably wasn't too smart making stores out of glass.

You fool, the panes of glass rotate to let the air blow right through. Don't you think jobs would have envisioned that people may want to pick up a 3G iPad in a hurricane to know where they end up after the wind takes them on a magical and revolutionary journey?
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post #19 of 44
Yes, it's probably due more to the subway shutting down at noon than anything else. The grocery store near me is shutting down tomorrow morning, a good 8 hours before the storm is anywhere near NYC. So the mayor orders 250,000 people to go somewhere else, and the governor shuts down the only way most people in the city have to get anywhere else without walking. Most of us don't have cars here. It's about $400/month just to park it in most parts of Manhattan.
post #20 of 44
these articles are absurd. lets stop incorporating apple into every single event that ever takes place. the story about hurricane irene is not apple related. lets give the people who live in these communities a little more respect because they are about to go through a terrible hurricane.
post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by punkrocker27ka View Post

these articles are absurd. lets stop incorporating apple into every single event that ever takes place. the story about hurricane irene is not apple related. lets give the people who live in these communities a little more respect because they are about to go through a terrible hurricane.

Well I think the irene just wanted to check out the apple store.
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post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

And zero of the iPhones I've seen are cracked, dented, smashed, or otherwise damaged.

I concur. I've seen only one cracked screen out of the many iPhones out in the wild. Some teen girl without the money to fix it, I presume. The phone was still working (she was on a call).

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Oh, sure, I agree that the iPhone 4 is impractically fragile; I can get where you're getting that. I probably wouldn't trust an iPhone 4 to be dropped more than a single time without some sort of issue and I definitely think they need to go to a LiquidMetal back for the thing.

But people ought to be more careful. You wouldn't be careless with a

I'm trying to think of something else made of glass that people often carry around and it's Oh, you wouldn't drop your diabetes machine. That's something of a poor analogy as an iPhone isn't necessary for you to stay alive, but when a lot of people behave as though they couldn't survive without their cell phones, they ought to be treating their cellphones with the respect you'd give to something life-essential.

Or maybe that's too much of a logical leap.

Whoa...I have dropped my iPhone and diabetes machine (called a glucometer BTW).

Not because I was foolish or stupid or have the dexterity of a llama (hilarious analogy, i did chuckle out load). They dropped because accidents, believe it or not, do happen. My iPhone slipped out of my button closed pocket while I was attempting to get up from a sitting position. It hit the concrete and the back panel smashed and that was that

My glocometer feel to the ground because as I was pricking my finger and trying not to drop blood all over the place and misjudged how much balance I had by balancing it on my knee.

Why was it on my knee? Because there was know where else clean enough to put it (i was in a public washroom). But guess what, my glucometer is fine. The iPhone on the other hand had to have the glass replaced ($29 bucks at the apple store).

However the phone seems to drop calls and miss texts a lot now. I am sorry; glass is just plain stupid choice for something thats gets handled all day long, in and out of pockets with keys, lighters, change and god knows what else.

I don't think you can blame all apple cracked screens on careless llama handed people. Sometimes: "life happens"!
post #24 of 44
Sad to see such ignorant comment.
post #25 of 44
I love how people are calling this a serious hurricane. This happens three times a year in the UK. I'm in new york right now and my god its all blown so terribly out of proportion.

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... at night.

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post #26 of 44
People are still complaining about using glass in their designs yet most of manhattan is skyscrapers with sheer panes of glass.
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post #27 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

I love how people are calling this a serious hurricane.

I love how people didn't consider Katrina to be a serious hurricane.

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply

Originally Posted by Slurpy

There's just a TINY chance that Apple will also be able to figure out payments. Oh wait, they did already… …and you’re already fucked.

 

Reply
post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

I love how people are calling this a serious hurricane. This happens three times a year in the UK. I'm in new york right now and my god its all blown so terribly out of proportion.

That's the NYC mentality for you. When the earthquake his in Virginia #NYCEarthquake was trending on Twitter. In Florida we call this weather Autumn.
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post #29 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

I love how people are calling this a serious hurricane. This happens three times a year in the UK. I'm in new york right now and my god its all blown so terribly out of proportion.

The city of New York has been preparing its populace for a storm that was previously classified as a Category 3 Hurricane when it made landfall in the Bahamas, with a potential to reach Category 4 by the following day. -- Category 3 Hurricanes absolutely do not take place three times a year in the UK.

Actually, the "worst storm on record" for the UK made landfall on October 15th, 1987, and it wasn't even classified as a Hurricane.

New York City, specifically, is a seaside, sea-level metropolis with a population that is roughly 1/8th the population of the entire UK. The people of NYC are largely below the poverty line, reside mostly in buildings towering over each other that date back to over a century old, and lack ability to evacuate without the use of public transport.

The US Government learned its lesson with Katrina (which, if you go to the Lower Nine today, is still in ruin). Forgive them for being dire and serious enough to affect the citizens in such a way as to assure their safety.
post #30 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

That's the NYC mentality for you. When the earthquake his in Virginia #NYCEarthquake was trending on Twitter. In Florida we call this weather Autumn.

The "NYC mentality" is formed in this case by the fact that weather that a Floridian might consider par for the course happens only once every couple decades in NYC.
post #31 of 44
I wonder how the North Carolina data center is holding up with the hurricane.

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post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

I love how people are calling this a serious hurricane. This happens three times a year in the UK. I'm in new york right now and my god its all blown so terribly out of proportion.

The storm doesn't hit here until tonight.

Northern Scotland occasionally gets the extratropical depressions that form once hurricanes dissipate in the north Atlantic, but it's nothing like a hurricane. London rarely gets a thunderstorm and shuts down when they get an inch of snow.

Hopefully this will all be unnecessary, but if the storm tracks a little to the west it would cause serious flooding in parts of NYC. Downed trees could also do damage around the area, and we had some bad windstorms last year that led to power outages. Officials got caught off guard by last year's blizzard and are being extra cautious today. I do still wonder whether the subway and buses could have been run a bit later (perhaps shutting down at 5:00 instead of 12:00), at least away from the low-lying areas.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I wonder how the North Carolina data center is holding up with the hurricane.

I doubt it is anywhere near Cape Hatteras for this very reason.
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by dpnorton82 View Post

The city of New York has been preparing its populace for a storm that was previously classified as a Category 3 Hurricane when it made landfall in the Bahamas, with a potential to reach Category 4 by the following day. -- Category 3 Hurricanes absolutely do not take place three times a year in the UK.

Actually, the "worst storm on record" for the UK made landfall on October 15th, 1987, and it wasn't even classified as a Hurricane.

New York City, specifically, is a seaside, sea-level metropolis with a population that is roughly 1/8th the population of the entire UK. The people of NYC are largely below the poverty line, reside mostly in buildings towering over each other that date back to over a century old, and lack ability to evacuate without the use of public transport.

The US Government learned its lesson with Katrina (which, if you go to the Lower Nine today, is still in ruin). Forgive them for being dire and serious enough to affect the citizens in such a way as to assure their safety.

Yes it was originally a Cat3, but it was getting weaker and weaker and everyone could see that.
To bring NYC to a screeching halt, to have Obama call it "historic", that is clearly overacting. I agree with getting people out of flood prone areas,

... at night.

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post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

The storm doesn't hit here until tonight.

Northern Scotland occasionally gets the extratropical depressions that form once hurricanes dissipate in the north Atlantic, but it's nothing like a hurricane. London rarely gets a thunderstorm and shuts down when they get an inch of snow.

Hopefully this will all be unnecessary, but if the storm tracks a little to the west it would cause serious flooding in parts of NYC. Downed trees could also do damage around the area, and we had some bad windstorms last year that led to power outages. Officials got caught off guard by last year's blizzard and are being extra cautious today. I do still wonder whether the subway and buses could have been run a bit later (perhaps shutting down at 5:00 instead of 12:00), at least away from the low-lying areas.

I know it doesn't. I'm in a hotel on 7th and 55th right now in front of the TV since the city has been shut down.

Why did you mention london? Being british doesn't make me a Londoner

I'm from the north east and in my life we've had storms powerful enough to smash glass, throw heavy garden furniture, uproot trees and rip tiles off of roofs held on with cement. September 24th last year - waves were so high they went /over/ the lighthouse on the coast of my city. 23rd May this year, 100mph on the west of england. 80mph with 16ft waves and flash flooding on the 23rd november last year, I believe there were 2 more in 2009 and so on and so forth - all of them stronger or just as strong as hurricane irene in its current state across the east coast. These kinds of Gale Force winds are common in the UK.

Getting people out of flood areas is obviously a good idea, but grinding the east-coast to a halt when other countries (or even other US states) with similar or worse weather would still be running normally is called over reacting to me. We don't get deep snow in the UK very often - we're not used to it, yet for the past two years with -(negative)18C weather and more snow than you can shake a stick at, we were absolutely fine. Airports never closed, people still went to a from work, public transport was up and running and so on and so forth. Not getting something often does not impair your ability to deal with it.

Sorry if I sound harsh. I'm just a very blunt person.

... at night.

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... at night.

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post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

I'm from the north east and in my life we've had storms powerful enough to smash glass, throw heavy garden furniture, uproot trees and rip tiles off of roofs held on with cement. September 24th last year - waves were so high they went /over/ the lighthouse on the coast of my city. 23rd May this year, 100mph on the west of england. 80mph with 16ft waves and flash flooding on the 23rd november last year, I believe there were 2 more in 2009 and so on and so forth - all of them stronger or just as strong as hurricane irene in its current state across the east coast. These kinds of Gale Force winds are common in the UK.

Hurricanes are different. Gale force winds happen everywhere, but the difference with a hurricane is that the high winds are sustained over hours. We had a storm last year north of the city that uprooted trees, knocked down power lines, etc. so we know how to handle "normal" storms, but we've all seen the kind of damage a hurricane can do. With all the tall buildings and the massive concentration of people (twice as dense as London and a lot more than northeast England).

This is a big deal because 50 million people are in its path, which is highly unusual (the last time was in the 1930s and the 1880s before that). While I think parts of the city could have stayed open longer, I don't disagree with the decision to begin the shutdown sooner rather than later. While Obama does have a tendency to use words like "historic" and "unprecedented" a lot, this storm is very unusual.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by KPOM View Post

I doubt it is anywhere near Cape Hatteras for this very reason.

It is located about 400 miles inland but according to noaa they are experiencing tropical storm force winds at this moment. Also, conceivably their first real test of being able to withstand flash flooding as well as the infrastructure testing such as possible loss of power, diesel fuel delivery capabilities etc.

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post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

What exactly is an "outdoor tim festival at Lincoln Center"?? Will Tim Cook be there?

Not anymore since it was canceled.

If we're lucky, this thing will head east. Worst case scenario for NYC is that this storm tracks to the west. As it stands, we'll be without the subway until late Monday. I'm guessing a lot of offices will be closed, as well as a lot of stores.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by benanderson89 View Post

Yes it was originally a Cat3, but it was getting weaker and weaker and everyone could see that.
To bring NYC to a screeching halt, to have Obama call it "historic", that is clearly overacting. I agree with getting people out of flood prone areas,

I believe that you are largely underestimating storm surge potential. If Manhattan floods, it's not going to be sea water pouring down the streets, it's going to be the raw sewage of the most densely populated metropolitan city in the country. -- Wade home through that!

As an NYC resident, and a first-response volunteer in NOLA post Katrina, I appreciate the urgency with which our government officials have addressed the storm. Getting 300,000+ people out of flood zones and 8 million others to set their lives aside in the interest of safety IS historic, if you ask me.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

Well I think the irene just wanted to check out the apple store.

Well, she does have an eye for that.
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post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

It is located about 400 miles inland but according to noaa they are experiencing tropical storm force winds at this moment. Also, conceivably their first real test of being able to withstand flash flooding as well as the infrastructure testing such as possible loss of power, diesel fuel delivery capabilities etc.

There was wind, but no rain in Durham nearby. North Carolina is a long state and the coast took it on the chin, but the data center most likely was unaffected...
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