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Briefly: Adobe PDF on iOS; Lion security; WebKit trademark

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Adobe has released a new application that allows PDF file conversions in iOS. Also, a security issue related to Lightweight Directory Access Protocol has been discovered in Mac OS X Lion. Finally, BlackBerry maker Research in Motion is opposing Apple's application for the WebKit trademark.

Adobe CreatePDF

Adobe released on Monday a new application for iPhone and iPad that lets users convert documents to PDF files right from the iOS mobile device.

Entitled CreatePDF, the application is available now in the iTunes App Store. The iPhone and iPad versions are currently selling for $9.99 each.

Adobe describes the app as a rich, high-fidelity and Acrobat-like PDF creation tool available to iOS device owners. The technology used by this iOS app is similar with the one used to run Adobes online CreatePDF service and Adobes Acrobat desktop software.

The app lets iOS users create PDF files from documents and files stored on the device or received via email. The converted files can then be previewed in the native environment, opened with help of other apps and shared with others via email.



CreatePDF supports various file formats such as MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, RTF, Text, WordPerfect, OpenOffice and StarOffice documents. The app is compatible with various image types like JPEG, BMP, PNG, GIF and TIFF.

The App Store houses various other iOS applications that offer support for only opening PDF files including Apples native eBook-reading app, iBooks.

A similar Adobe app is also available for Android devices.

LDAP security issue in Lion

An authentication security hole has been discovered in OS X Lion systems related to Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), a technology used by IT departments to let users securely access services on a specific network.

LDAP servers handle user accounts and user authentication via PCs on a network. This new OS X bug would let anyone using a Lion-running system that was previously bound to the LDAP network to gain access to network resources even without having proper log in information such as a registered user name and a correct password.

According to CNET, the LDAP network is accessible\t even in cases where someone uses other usernames, including nonexistent ones, on a Lion computer linked to the network.

The problem cant be dealt with by simply logging out of the OS X Lion system, so a reboot would be required in order to prevent others from logging in using fake credentials and accessing that networks file system.

Other solutions for temporarily fixing this security issue include downgrading systems to Snow Leopard or unbinding them from the LDAP servers until a Lion update patches this critical security hole.

Lion systems, whether recently purchased or older models, that are not connected to a network via a LDAP server, which IT administrators would have to enable beforehand, are not affected by this issue.

Apple recently issued the first OS X Lion update, version 10.7.1, but this new release doesnt include a fix for the LDAP authentication problem.

The company has been notified about this issue and an appropriate fix is expected in the future. A beta build of Mac OS X 10.7.2 has already been seeded to developers and it should be released soon, although its not yet clear whether it will include the LDAP fix or not.

WebKit trademark

RIM filed an official opposing motion with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office earlier this month against Apples trademark filing for the term WebKit.

WebKit is a technology introduced by Apple in 2002 and derived from the Konqueror browsers KHTML software library. It is essentially an engine that makes it possible for Internet browsers to render web pages.

The company turned the project open-source three years later, in 2005. Because it is open-source now, anyone interested in using it can do so freely regardless of whether Apple is awarded the trademark, which the company filed for in May 2010.

The reasoning behind RIMs decision to oppose the trademark filing remains unknown at this time. The Canadian smartphone and tablet maker has been granted until Nov. 22 to prepare its case against Apple, PatentlyApple has discovered.



Initially, WebKit was used by Apple to develop its own desktop browser, Safari. Once it became an open-source project, other companies have started implementing this technology when creating their own desktop or mobile browsing products. Apples mobile version of Safari, the default browser on iOS devices such as iPhone, iPod touch and iPad, is also based on WebKit.

Research in Motion is using the WebKit technology for the mobile BlackBerry Browser found on board the companys mobile devices.

Other similar products that are based on this open-source project include Google Chrome, the Android web browser, the Symbian S60 mobile browser, the webOS browser and the experimental browser on Amazons Kindle e-reader. Even Internet Explorer has a Google-built plugin capable of using WebKit for rendering Internet pages.

According to a previous estimate, Safari and Google Chrome now represent over 21.5 percent of web users, making it the second most widely used rendering engine among web browsers, behind only Microsoft's Internet Explorer.



A final ruling on Apples WebKit trademark filing could be issued early next year. Should Apple be awarded the trademark, the company could use it in marketing materials for its products while rival companies would be prevented from advertising the web page rendering technology even if used in their products.
post #2 of 19
"A final ruling on Apple’s “WebKit” trademark filing could be issued early next year. Should Apple be awarded the trademark, the company could use it in marketing materials for its products while rival companies would be prevented from advertising the web page rendering technology even if used in their products."

Why wouldn't Apple want others advertising the fact they use Apple's webKit by simply making sure the DO use the trademark, the same way 'Intel inside' is used?
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Why wouldn't Apple want others advertising the fact they use Apple's webKit by simply making sure the DO use the trademark, the same way 'Intel inside' is used?

I don't get it either.
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post #4 of 19
All this bickering and posturing means nothing to us old timers. If it is open source, any marketing mumbo jumbo is just for noobies and stock holders. I'm thinking of giving up on the Internet altogether and reverting back to snail mail and newspapers. Same with TV. I am just going to put up a digital antenna and cut the cable. All I need is the local channels. Screw the modern world. I'm moving to Montana soon, gonna be a dental floss tycoon. I'm gonna find me a horse, just about this big, and ride him all along the border line. Just me and the the pigmy pony over by the dental floss.

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post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I don't get it either.

I would think a logical outcome (for all involved) would be that other companies CAN mention WebKit, but if they choose to do so, there must be a footnote that its an Apple trademark. Seems fair to me!
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I would think a logical outcome (for all involved) would be that other companies CAN mention WebKit, but if they choose to do so, there must be a footnote that its an Apple trademark. Seems fair to me!

That does make sense. Thanks.
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I don't get it either.

I never thought WebKit had any real mindshare with the average user. I mean, Apple could also trademark Cocoa or something, but most Mac and iPhone users wouldn't care. People know what Safari is, but WebKit?

And why would RIM care about the term WebKit? It's not like they are going to throw it into marketing materials. And it wouldn't matter if they did.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I never thought WebKit had any real mindshare with the average user. I mean, Apple could also trademark Cocoa or something, but most Mac and iPhone users wouldn't care. People know what Safari is, but WebKit?

And why would RIM care about the term WebKit? It's not like they are going to throw it into marketing materials. And it wouldn't matter if they did.

Apple might be gearing up to start giving it mindshare. I bet WebKit is the default browser engine on more new devices than anything else on the market.
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post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... The reasoning behind RIMs decision to oppose the trademark filing remains unknown at this time. ....

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Apple night be gearing up to start giving it mindshare. I bet WebKit is the default browser engine on more new devices than anything else on the market.

Smartphones overtook PC sales earlier this year and since almost all smartphones use WebKit I think you are right that there are more new devices with webkit than anything else.

However, I don't think consumers really care. iOS owners use Safari. They know it is an HTML5 browser. The fact it is webkit under the hood is irrelevant.
post #11 of 19
This whole LDAP flaw thing getting reported around sounds like really bad reporting.

If there is a bug in the client that is allowing full access to a server and bypassing all the security in place... it sounds like the bug in the client it taking advantage of a unpatched vulnerability in the server. The server should be secure and not allow a buggy client to access things it has no authentication with the server to access. This cannot be just a Lion bug alone.
post #12 of 19
$9.99? Yeah, thanks but no thanks. Other companies came to the PDF creation party earlier and charged less.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagromme View Post

I would think a logical outcome (for all involved) would be that other companies CAN mention WebKit, but if they choose to do so, there must be a footnote that it’s an Apple trademark. Seems fair to me!

That would be my guess about why they're doing this too. I think someone in Apple is getting a little fed up with Google's propaganda painting them as anti-open source/closed/proprietary/evil when in fact, Apple probably has more open source projects going on and has contributed back much more to the FOSS community than Google. (And no, I won't back that up. It's a guess and I don't care if I'm right or wrong--the point is that they do contribute a lot back to open source.)

Go talk to a few Google fans and ask them if Apple supports open source, and most of them (assuming your experiences are like mine) will tell you no and that Apple doesn't do open source. Then casually ask them if they were aware that Google's Chrome browser is powered by Apple's open source rendering library. I've had several Google fans tell me that's not possible only to look it up and tell me later they didn't realize.

I'm sure someone amongst Apple's marketing people is aware of the negative image of Apple that Google is pushing. This would be a good way to undercut that.
post #14 of 19
RIM uses Apple's WebKit in all their mobile products but now wants to attack Apple for trademarking the name? How about instead sending Apple a big thank you for saving you the time and expense of developing your own browser?

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post #15 of 19
The operative word there is "could". Not that they have decalred their intent to do that it's just speculation by the article's author.

Apple is all about making sure that what they own is well identified and offered what protection is needed - in this probably to prevent WebKit from become a "Kleenex" brand issue.
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post #16 of 19
If Apple has problems in the courts defending 'App Store", even after Salesforce said they gave them that trademark.
Who would believe that Rim won't be able to block 'WebKit'.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by doh123 View Post

This whole LDAP flaw thing getting reported around sounds like really bad reporting.

If there is a bug in the client that is allowing full access to a server and bypassing all the security in place... it sounds like the bug in the client it taking advantage of a unpatched vulnerability in the server. The server should be secure and not allow a buggy client to access things it has no authentication with the server to access. This cannot be just a Lion bug alone.

Yes, I'm confused on what the issue really is. It sounds like Lion is cacheing the credentials of the first good log in, and using those credentials over and over again rather than submitting new credentials. That's the only way it makes sense to me.

- Jasen.
post #18 of 19
The following quote from the article is not true.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Because it is open-source now, anyone interested in using it can do so freely regardless of whether Apple is awarded the trademark, which the company filed for in May 2010.

Being open source does not mean open licensed. Under the right license, a software package can be both open source, and completely locked down to one company.

Second, a trademark dispute has nothing to do with the license or source code status of a software package. If Apple was awarded a trademark on the name "WebKit", it means no other company can use that name to describe a product or service without Apple's consent; even if they're describing the exact same open source package as a resell.

RIM is objecting to this because they could not advertise that they use the WebKit engine in marketing without paying Apple's desired trademark fee; Apple may choose not to charge one, and only ask for recognition.

Apple is applying for the trade mark, so that no competitor can do so, and possibly to control the effectiveness of a competitor's marketing.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

All this bickering and posturing means nothing to us old timers. If it is open source, any marketing mumbo jumbo is just for noobies and stock holders. I'm thinking of giving up on the Internet altogether and reverting back to snail mail and newspapers. Same with TV. I am just going to put up a digital antenna and cut the cable. All I need is the local channels. Screw the modern world. I'm moving to Montana soon, gonna be a dental floss tycoon. I'm gonna find me a horse, just about this big, and ride him all along the border line. Just me and the the pigmy pony over by the dental floss.

Make sure to get yourself a real poncho -- don't get caught up in one of them Sears ponchos.
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