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Apple already using Web-based iOS diagnostics, could eliminate trips to store

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
While reports claim Apple is looking to remotely address iPhone and iPad issues with a Web-based service, the company is already utilizing the same technology for some repairs conducted in its retail stores, AppleInsider has learned [updated with more information].

A person familiar with Apple's retail operations revealed that the company has already been using the site iosdiags.apple.com for repairs at many retail locations. Users can visit the site on their iOS device to launch the Web application, where they are asked for an Apple ID.

When the site is run from a customer's device, the results are said to be sent back to the MobileGenius software used in-store by Apple's Genius representatives. The data can also be read from the desktop iRepair software to which Geniuses have access.

The Web application, which runs in the Mobile Safari browser, can reportedly detect iOS software version, hardware battery health, any application crashes or system hangs, unexpected restarts, improper shutdowns, dropped calls, modem resets and more. This person also said the software can detect whether a user has "jailbroken" their iOS device, allowing it to run unauthorized code in a potentially warranty voiding process.

Update: A second person came forward to clarify how the process works. A Genius reportedly goes to the iOS diagnostics site and obtains a 5-digit session number. The customer then opens the Mobile Safari browser on their iOS device and visits "diags://session_id" and agrees to the terms of service. A Genius can then see the results on their device.

Currently, the Web application only works with an employee Apple ID and is not connected to an iTunes account. The data culled from the service reportedly provides an Apple Genius with the same information they would obtain plugging in an iPhone at the Genius Bar with a USB cable.

The system was said to have been put in place to make it easier to conduct mobile appointments away from the Genius Bar, in an effort to make it less crowded, AppleInsider was told. Using this tool in-store allows an employee to access diagnostic information wirelessly and quickly.

But the iOS diagnostics page can also be accessed from outside of Apple's servers on an iOS device, potentially paving the way for representatives to obtain diagnostic information from users remotely, such as during a telephone support call.



In this manner, an Apple representative could obtain vital information regarding a person's iPhone and potentially diagnose and fix a problem easily and remotely. This way, lesser problems that are easier to fix could be done without the need to schedule a Genius Bar appointment at a local Apple Store, or without returning an iPhone to Apple for repair.

Apple's iOS diagnostic tool apparently already utilized in its retail stores appears identical to details in a report from earlier Wednesday, in which HardMac said that Apple has internally announced a new remote diagnostic tool. The information could suggest that Apple plans to expand its current Web-based application, now in use at some retail stores, and expand it for remote use, such as telephone-based support.
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A person familiar with Apple's retail operations revealed that the company has already been using the site iosdiags.apple.com for repairs at many retail locations. Users can visit the site on their iOS device to launch the Web application, where they are asked for an Apple ID.

This person IS NOT familiar with Apple's retail operations.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Mozzarella View Post

This person IS NOT familiar with Apple's retail operations.


Exactly. Because anyone that is would know that only employee Apple ID's work to access the system and it actually requires two websites to work (something I learned while watching the genius that was working on my iPhone a couple of months ago).
post #4 of 13
I understand the brand value of adding the "i" before products...

But can Apple PLEASE drop the "iForgot" button? It is not a product. It does nothing to enhance the brand, and there is no reason to spread any good feelings from other i products to a button you press when you forget your password.

Its a cutesy good for nothing decision, much like the faux real designs of Address Book in Lion.

Its weird seeing Apple moving to a very utilitarian (but good looking) look in all of Lion, but going in the complete opposite direction for iCal and Address Book. The same way, its weird to see them making their online initiatives far more classy, but dropping the iForgot bomb on us.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

I understand the brand value of adding the "i" before products...

But can Apple PLEASE drop the "iForgot" button? It is not a product. It does nothing to enhance the brand, and there is no reason to spread any good feelings from other i products to a button you press when you forget your password.

Its a cutesy good for nothing decision, much like the faux real designs of Address Book in Lion.

Its weird seeing Apple moving to a very utilitarian (but good looking) look in all of Lion, but going in the complete opposite direction for iCal and Address Book. The same way, its weird to see them making their online initiatives far more classy, but dropping the iForgot bomb on us.

I agree with the iForgot button. They need to drop that.

However I like the faux designs. I'd like to see that in more apps. It helps distinquish one app from another. It also looks great full screen. The utilitarian look is fine for dialogs and apps that are dismissed quickly. It is also great for apps that are mostly content and don't need much UI. The monochrome look also works well in apps that shouldn't throw off your color perception (like a photo editor). The utilitarian look is great for some things, I just think it and the faux look both have their place. I'm sure we will see much more faux-style apps on both OS X and iOS as time moves on. The latest developer SDKs are starting to encourage this faux-style with new skinning features. I just hope developers don't take it overboard and start skinning preference panes and such. I like skinning in iCal and Address Book, I hate it in WinAMP. Many Windows developers go way over-the-top on skinning.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

I understand the brand value of adding the "i" before products...

But can Apple PLEASE drop the "iForgot" button? It is not a product. It does nothing to enhance the brand, and there is no reason to spread any good feelings from other i products to a button you press when you forget your password.

Its a cutesy good for nothing decision, much like the faux real designs of Address Book in Lion.

Its weird seeing Apple moving to a very utilitarian (but good looking) look in all of Lion, but going in the complete opposite direction for iCal and Address Book. The same way, its weird to see them making their online initiatives far more classy, but dropping the iForgot bomb on us.

Using the lowercase "i" in software looks tacky. In particular, the "iCal" name makes absolutely no sense to me. Okay, I get "iChat" and "iTunes", very clever Apple.
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

Using the lowercase "i" in software looks tacky. In particular, the "iCal" name makes absolutely no sense to me. Okay, I get "iChat" and "iTunes", very clever Apple.

iGetIt. iAgree.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

Using the lowercase "i" in software looks tacky. In particular, the "iCal" name makes absolutely no sense to me. Okay, I get "iChat" and "iTunes", very clever Apple.

How about "iAddress" for Address Book? Maybe "iPrefer" for System Preferences? iMail, iFind, ... If this were Linux they would do it... KDE: kOffice, kEdit, kOrganizer, kPresenter, k... Gnome used to be the same but someone introduced some sanity at some point.

iTunes is fine, but it would be nice if iChat and iCal were more consistently named.
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

Using the lowercase "i" in software looks tacky. In particular, the "iCal" name makes absolutely no sense to me. Okay, I get "iChat" and "iTunes", very clever Apple.

iCal DOES make sense when you understand how it's supposed to work.

iCal uses the iCal format which is not designed by Apple at all. iCal is an internet calendering protocol allowing for people to easily syncronise their calendars in much the same way Exchange allows server side storage of calendars that can be accessed by other people.

The "i" before a name originally signified "Internet" such as on the iMac which was an internet ready machine right out of the box back when PCs still largely had external modems or had to buy network or modem cards to access the internet.

iCal, iChat, iTunes, iMovie, iPhoto, etc are ALL designed to be internet connectable whereas AddressBook, GarageBand, etc aren't focused on the Internet aspect.

iForgot is actually a nice play on the words "I forgot" which is exactly what you have done when you can't remember your password.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by esummers View Post

I agree with the iForgot button. They need to drop that.

However I like the faux designs. I'd like to see that in more apps. It helps distinquish one app from another. It also looks great full screen. The utilitarian look is fine for dialogs and apps that are dismissed quickly. It is also great for apps that are mostly content and don't need much UI. The monochrome look also works well in apps that shouldn't throw off your color perception (like a photo editor). The utilitarian look is great for some things, I just think it and the faux look both have their place. I'm sure we will see much more faux-style apps on both OS X and iOS as time moves on. The latest developer SDKs are starting to encourage this faux-style with new skinning features. I just hope developers don't take it overboard and start skinning preference panes and such. I like skinning in iCal and Address Book, I hate it in WinAMP. Many Windows developers go way over-the-top on skinning.

Agree about the "iForgot". That should not have happened. Only products should carry the "i" naming scheme.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #11 of 13
Back on topic..

This is yet another way Apple is enhancing their retail experience. Nobody really likes to have to head to an Apple store if it is something easily fixed. This would also help folks that are a little further away from a retail store.

Most, if not all, of Apple's competitors are looking at certain aspects of Apple's business, but it's a combination of all the little things that enhance Apple's relationship with its customers.
post #12 of 13
Wow .. I have been suggesting to customer support representatives for YEARS that they should use ARD for the very same thing for their desktops and notebooks. Someone explain why this hasn't happened yet? If you are going to say because of security issues involved when accessing someone's machine remotely, what makes a desktop or notebook that much different from an iPhone? Oh .. you are going to say "because people do not worry about the content or have sensitive information or documents on their iPhone .. but, on a computer, they do." Right? Ok. Now I understand.
post #13 of 13
So Safari has secret Apis for this? This will be a giant security target. This is like the convenience od ActiveX in IE. I'm sure they have it all locked down. Hahaha!
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