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Apple wants to 'rethink' how people use Maps for iPhone, iPad

post #1 of 42
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Apple is once again adding to its iOS Maps software development team, calling for job candidates who will help "rethink" how iPhone users rely on maps, location and geographical information.

Location services on the iPhone and iPad have been an area of great focus for Apple for some time. That interest continues to grow, as Apple this week posted three new job listings for iOS software developers focused on the native Maps application and discovered by AppleInsider.

"We want to take Maps to the next level and rethink how people use maps, location and geo information," one listing reads. "We want to do this in a seamless, highly interactive and enjoyable way. We've only just started!"

The description is very similar to a job listing posted by Apple in late 2009, which also mentioned taking Maps "to the next level" and an effort to "rethink" the software. But the 2011 version found in the new job postings makes additional mention of location services and geographical data.

The new employees are asked to be familiar with navigation, along with GPS and location-based services. The three job listings only add to the mounting evidence that Apple could be working on its own turn-by-turn navigation service for the iPhone, perhaps similar to the free Google Maps Navigation available on Android devices.

The latest job postings come only days after separate listings by Apple revealed the company is working on "exciting new features" for location-aware software on the iPhone. For that role, Apple also seeks an employee who has experience with "navigation algorithms."

Apple has been on something of a hiring spree related to location services in 2011. In March, the company put a call out for more than two dozen positions related to iOS development, with a particular focus on location services. More job listings from that same month revealed that the company wants to "radically improve" the native Maps application for iPhone.

Apple's forthcoming iOS 5 will add alternate routes to Maps.

News of a forthcoming navigation service was publicly disclosed by Apple in April, when the iPhone maker revealed to the U.S. government that it is working on a "crowd-sourced traffic" service for the iPhone. It was said that the location-based traffic service was planned to become available in "the next couple of years."

Apple has even made key acquisitions to expand mapping software for iOS, with the purchase of Google Maps competitor Placebase in 2009, while another online mapping company, Poly9, was acquired in 2010.
post #2 of 42
Apple should have "rethought" maps for iOS 5. I guess with this posting we have to wait another year. Is it that hard to build in turn by turn nav with caching so that you can load in the destination and relevant map data and get to your destination?

The maps in iOS 5 are not bad, don't get me wrong. The things maps app does it does extremely well, including transit directions and walking directions. But it is lacking some pretty essential features I described above, and with siri and nuance the maps could be voice requested and voice guided.

We'll see what happens, but I am happy that at least the ball is rolling now.

PS: also can we get a speed indicator in maps somehow?
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post #3 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple is once again adding to its iOS Maps software development team, calling for job candidates who will help "rethink" how iPhone users rely on maps, location and geographical information.

Location services on the iPhone and iPad have been an area of great focus for Apple for some time. That interest continues to grow, as Apple this week posted three new job listings for iOS software developers focused on the native Maps application.

"We want to take Maps to the next level and rethink how people use maps, location and geo information," one listing reads. "We want to do this in a seamless, highly interactive and enjoyable way. We've only just started!"

The description is very similar to a job listing posted by Apple in late 2009, which also mentioned taking Maps "to the next level" and an effort to "rethink" the software. But the 2011 version found in the new job postings makes additional mention of location services and geographical data.

The new employees are asked to be familiar with navigation, along with GPS and location-based services. The three job listings only add to the mounting evidence that Apple could be working on its own turn-by-turn navigation service for the iPhone, perhaps similar to the free Google Maps Navigation available on Android devices.

The latest job postings come only days after separate listings by Apple revealed the company is working on "exciting new features" for location-aware software on the iPhone. For that role, Apple also seeks an employee who has experience with "navigation algorithms."

Apple has been on something of a hiring spree related to location services in 2011. In March, the company put a call out for more than two dozen positions related to iOS development, with a particular focus on location services. More job listings from that same month revealed that the company wants to "radically improve" the native Maps application for iPhone.

Apple's forthcoming iOS 5 will add alternate routes to Maps.

News of a forthcoming navigation service was publicly disclosed by Apple in April, when the iPhone maker revealed to the U.S. government that it is working on a "crowd-sourced traffic" service for the iPhone. It was said that the location-based traffic service was planned to become available in "the next couple of years."

Apple has even made key acquisitions to expand mapping software for iOS, with the purchase of Google Maps competitor Placebase in 2009, while another online mapping company, Poly9, was acquired in 2010.

How will it crowd-source traffic? Users give updates while driving? No. Keep GPS on and push data up to the cloud? No, wastes battery. Best option is to continue with what DOT does now, using sensors.

Also, it'd be great to finally have good mapping software on phones. Mapping software in general should be easier to use. For example ArcGIS is the Windows of mapping software but its interface is archaic, ugly, and difficult to use, particularly at first.

Mapping apps on Droid and iOS I would say so far are suboptimal, particularly in the interface. I'd really like it if someone replicated ESRI's ArcPad functionality, only easier to use, and cheap. On iOS and Droid. But still working with shapefiles and with the power of GIS. If anyone can tackle mapping software it'd be Apple. Hopefully they hire GIS programmers and cartogrpahers, to really knock this out of the park.
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post #4 of 42
iOS users will still use Google maps even if Apple creates their own app.
post #5 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by punkrocker27ka View Post

iOS users will still use Google maps even if Apple creates their own app.

You mean backend, or the mapping data. Apple already has its own maps app that happens to load maps from google, but I guess could do the same with just about any mapping provider.

I would have to agree, if apple can't match the google maps quality it should keep the backend. But the app itself should get an update.
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post #6 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by punkrocker27ka View Post

iOS users will still use Google maps even if Apple creates their own app.

Remember that Map app on the iPhone is Apple's own App not a Google App, it simply uses Google Maps. I suspect something is coming and I hope it is an all Apple mapping system top to bottom.
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post #7 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

You mean backend, or the mapping data. Apple already has its own maps app that happens to load maps from google, but I guess could do the same with just about any mapping provider.

I would have to agree, if apple can't match the google maps quality it should keep the backend. But the app itself should get an update.

It's unclear if they are trying to update the app or create their own location services backend. If it's the ladder, I don't see how the data and features could match Google maps. Do they want to sever all ties?
post #8 of 42
"Apple wants to 'rethink' how people use Maps for iPhone, iPad"

That could be interpreted as Apple not knowing how we use Maps and needs to figure it out!
post #9 of 42
People continue to be surprised at what Apple comes up with because they still fail to see the philosophy behind Apple. The company is never anxious over how long it takes to make things right. Do they sometimes fail? Sure, but the goal is always to make the best product they can before releasing it. So if it takes a year more than you and I want it to, tough.
post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

Is it that hard to build in turn by turn nav with caching so that you can load in the destination and relevant map data and get to your destination?

Why don't you give it a shot and let us know if it's hard. ;p

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

The maps in iOS 5 are not bad, don't get me wrong. The things maps app does it does extremely well, including transit directions and walking directions. But it is lacking some pretty essential features I described above, and with siri and nuance the maps could be voice requested and voice guided.

Check out the TomTom app, it's REALLY good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

PS: also can we get a speed indicator in maps somehow?

Again, the TomTom app does this. It even has an alarm for when it thinks you are speeding too much.
post #11 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicMac View Post

People continue to be surprised at what Apple comes up with because they still fail to see the philosophy behind Apple. The company is never anxious over how long it takes to make things right. Do they sometimes fail? Sure, but the goal is always to make the best product they can before releasing it. So if it takes a year more than you and I want it to, tough.

This isn't about benefits to the Apple user. Instead it's Apple formulating the best way to encourage (or bribe) their users to allow location reporting to aid in Apple's delivery of targeted advertising, taking a page from Google. LBS will be adding billions to someone's bottom line by 2015. Apple wants a piece of that.

So this is about the money, with the consumer benefit just being the hook. Of course isn't it always?
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post #12 of 42
My wish list
  1. Allow the user to exclude certain roads that the user specifies.
  2. Better user input. Voice recognition would be great. "Route path from home to 36 Elm Street."
  3. Turn by turn audio output that has preference settings that allow user to set frequency of audio outputs. For example, you can tell it to only identify major turns.
  4. Multiple destinations in one route

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post #13 of 42
"iPhone 5", or whatever they call it, is pretty much a certainty. What I'm more curious about is these hidden iOS 5 features. Will "Assistant" make it into this fall's 5.0 release? Will any of these hidden Maps features make it in, or are these merely for next year's version?

Assistant, combined with an improved Maps app would be KILLER.

*user holds down home button*
-"Where's the nearest Japanese restaurant?"
iPhone: "One moment...The nearest Japanese restaurant is Okazu-Ya, about 5 minutes away."
-"Get me a reservation for 7 o'clock tonight"
iPhone: "Sure. I've made an Open Table reservation for two at 7 o'clock tonight at Okazu-Ya restaurant. Would you like directions?"
-"Yes."
iPhone: One second. 19th Avenue is experiencing heavy traffic. Would you like me to re-route you to Sunset Boulevard?
-"Yes."
iPhone: OK. Start out by making a right onto Lincoln Avenue...
*Display show simplified "schematic" map of route to restaurant.

^This is all quite realistic. The Siri app purchased by Apple did this conversation-type stuff a long time ago. If all they did was improve its speed and give it typical Apple polish, I'd be happy as a clam.
post #14 of 42
I'd like better integration from the Maps app to other applications that use the Maps API. As an example, sometimes I will open up Maps to look at a satellite image of neighborhood, and then decide I want to check it out in Zillow or Redfin. Maybe after looking through those apps, I want to see what the commercial real-estate market looks like, so I switch to LoopNet. Right now, that process is pretty clunky. It is completely independent applications with no ability to pass information between.

I understand the security issues, but it would be nice for me.

Lots of other ways it could be improved as well...
post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by techno View Post

My wish list
  1. Allow the user to exclude certain roads that the user specifies.
  2. Better user input. Voice recognition would be great. "Route path from home to 36 Elm Street."
  3. Turn by turn audio output that has preference settings that allow user to set frequency of audio outputs. For example, you can tell it to only identify major turns.
  4. Multiple destinations in one route

Road exclusion is better suited to a standalone PND in my opinion and would be a seldom used option in any case. But it would have some benefits to those in congested metros. Worth considering. Same with multiple destinations, even if they're optimized (not sorted as there's a difference). Very few nav users actually route to multiple stops in a single trip, and those that do often complain of the resultant route.

Voice recognition would be expected and is already offered with several mobile nav apps, some free, as well as standalone systems. Customizing route instructions would be another lightly feature more prone to setup errors (and irritatating users) than being truly beneficial.

In any event I don't see Apple rolling out a navigation or mapping application that encourages much in the way of user customization. They're more of a "just works" company than worrying about a small minority of users that want to be able to tweak every setting.
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post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

....Is it that hard to build in turn by turn nav with caching so that you can load in the destination and relevant map data and get to your destination?

Considering most store clerks cant' even give change without the cash register telling them what the amount is.... it's probably pretty hard.

What do you do? are you into quantum physics?
post #17 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by techno View Post

My wish list
  1. Allow the user to exclude certain roads that the user specifies.
  2. Better user input. Voice recognition would be great. "Route path from home to 36 Elm Street."
  3. Turn by turn audio output that has preference settings that allow user to set frequency of audio outputs. For example, you can tell it to only identify major turns.
  4. Multiple destinations in one route

Good list. I hope they incorporate these features... Google maps on Android has all but #3 I believe.
post #18 of 42
Something I've always wanted is the ability to see what's around my destination as far as hotels, restaurants, stores, etc.

While I'm driving I would like to see what's a mile ahead of me. Navigon does this to an extent, but Apple could do it better.
post #19 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquatic View Post

How will it crowd-source traffic? Users give updates while driving? No. Keep GPS on and push data up to the cloud? No, wastes battery. Best option is to continue with what DOT does now, using sensors.


Well, I dunno, I often have my phone plugged in in the car, so it could push updates when on an external power source...
post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

Something I've always wanted is the ability to see what's around my destination as far as hotels, restaurants, stores, etc.

While I'm driving I would like to see what's a mile ahead of me. Navigon does this to an extent, but Apple could do it better.

Tom Tom does a great job with this. You can specifically search for Points of Interests near you, in a city, near Home, along route and near destination. On the iPhone that search can also be done via Google instead of using the localized DB.
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post #21 of 42
I've got high hopes for this. Really hope they add in turn by turn and then voice recognition as well. Those are the only two things I've missed from my old Droid. It was great being able to hit one button and say "Navigate to Best Buy" and have the app open, figure out where you're at, find the closest BBuy and then tell you how to get there. I know Apple can do better though.
post #22 of 42
This is what the free Google Maps Navigation app on Android offers, much more extensive than what's available to iOS users:
http://www.google.com/mobile/navigation/

Well worth taking a look at it. Just as every tablet gets compared to the iPad, any Apple navigation app (tho vaporware for now) would be put next to Google's app for judgement. As Mr. Jobs said, you can't know if you fail or succeed if you don't have anything to compare to.
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post #23 of 42
gps directions for commercial vehicles (trucks) that are not permitted on many roads.

every truck or commercial vehicle has a need for an easy mapping guide. there is an open door for a provider.
post #24 of 42
Where is "Find My Friends"? (the Apple version)

I'm still waiting.
post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by See Flat View Post

Considering most store clerks cant' even give change without the cash register telling them what the amount is.... it's probably pretty hard.

What do you do? are you into quantum physics?

I'm an accountant. But I know Google did it, TomTom did it. Why can't apple do it?

Just because I can't code a navigation app does not mean it's not easy for a company that specializes in software to code a navigation app.

Oh and BTW I am currently using Navigon for navigation, but I would like to see apple maps to grow in features.
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post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by punkrocker27ka View Post

It's unclear if they are trying to update the app or create their own location services backend. If it's the ladder, I don't see how the data and features could match Google maps. Do they want to sever all ties?

Well if it is the ladder, that might have something to do with Apple's stated intention of taking their maps "to the next level."
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post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

This isn't about benefits to the Apple user. Instead it's Apple formulating the best way to encourage (or bribe) their users to allow location reporting to aid in Apple's delivery of targeted advertising, taking a page from Google. LBS will be adding billions to someone's bottom line by 2015. Apple wants a piece of that.

So this is about the money, with the consumer benefit just being the hook. Of course isn't it always?

That's quite an assured analysis of Apple's strategy to be based on nothing.
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post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

That's quite an assured analysis of Apple's strategy to be based on nothing.

It's an opinion based on much more than "nothing". If Apple didn't see billions of potential revenue from mapping and navigation, they wouldn't be wasting their time with it. There's already several good navigation apps in their AppStore. This is all about the money. Dangle the carrot of free or very inexpensive mapping and directions in return for users agreeing to send their travel and location stats to Apple, enabling targeted ads or whatever else Apple can find value in.

http://www.pyramidresearch.com/store...d-Services.htm

http://uk.thewherebusiness.com/fc_th...cID=0&cValue=1
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post #29 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

It's an opinion based on much more than "nothing". If Apple didn't see billions of potential revenue from mapping and navigation, they wouldn't be wasting their time with it. There's already several good navigation apps in their AppStore. This is all about the money. Dangle the carrot of free or very inexpensive mapping and directions in return for users agreeing to send their travel and location stats to Apple, enabling targeted ads or whatever else Apple can find value in.

http://www.pyramidresearch.com/store...d-Services.htm

http://uk.thewherebusiness.com/fc_th...cID=0&cValue=1

So I guess we can assume that from now on any and all improvements by Apple to any and all services and software will be motivated by potential billions in targeted advertising? Since they already have good versions of most services and software and otherwise they wouldn't be wasting their time on it?
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post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

So I guess we can assume that from now on any and all improvements by Apple to any and all services and software will be motivated by potential billions in targeted advertising? Since they already have good versions of most services and software and otherwise they wouldn't be wasting their time on it?

That's pretty much it, tho not always an advertising angle. If there's already good services available, and Apple won't make some significant revenue from making an investment in that same field, pissing off the existing developer's in the process, Apple aint' doin' it. Doesn't make it wrong, but that's the way business works. Unless you're Google you don't give value away for free. There's going to be money in it for Apple.
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post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings View Post

Where is "Find My Friends"? (the Apple version)

I'm still waiting.

I already explained where it is the last time you asked this.

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post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

That's pretty much it, tho not always an advertising angle. If there's already good services available, and Apple won't make some significant revenue from making an investment in that same field, pissing off the existing developer's in the process, Apple aint' doin' it. Doesn't make it wrong, but that's the way business works. Unless you're Google you don't give value away for free. There's going to be money in it for Apple.

Um, OK, but what happened to "adding value to the platform" which last time I checked was how Apple makes 99% of its money? Why is it not possible that Apple would want to improve location/mapping services for the same reason they improve iOS or OS X or any of their applications or any of their services, or for that matter their hardware? Which is to make their products more desirable so they can sell more of them? Why do location/mapping improvements have to be predicated on selling billions of dollars in iAds?

I'm not saying Apple would be adverse to selling more ads, I just absolutely reject the opinion that that represents their only possible motivation for improving services.
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post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Um, OK, but what happened to "adding value to the platform" which last time I checked was how Apple makes 99% of its money? Why is it not possible that Apple would want to improve location/mapping services for the same reason they improve iOS or OS X or any of their applications or any of their services, or for that matter their hardware? Which is to make their products more desirable so they can sell more of them? Why do location/mapping improvements have to be predicated on selling billions of dollars in iAds?

I'm not saying Apple would be adverse to selling more ads, I just absolutely reject the opinion that that represents their only possible motivation for improving services.

Because of the investment required, at least a billion or more as a guess (and probably with an " 's " on the end), to duplicate services that are already avialable on the iPhone, albeit from 3rd party sources like TomTom, Garmin, Navigon (still Garmin) and the like. Since they already profit from those third party developers, and those apps already "add value to the platform", why would they in effect send them packing, forget about their money and lose their good will? They wouldn't unless they could see potential $Billions of revenue from an investment that's going to have major continuous costs associated with it. And they won't recoup those costs by charging a couple of dollars for a navigation app, if they charge anything at all.
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post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

Because of the investment required, at least a billion or more as a guess (and probably with an " 's " on the end), to duplicate services that are already avialable on the iPhone, albeit from 3rd party sources like TomTom, Garmin, Navigon (still Garmin) and the like. Since they already profit from those third party developers, and those apps already "add value to the platform", why would they in effect send them packing, forget about their money and lose their good will? They wouldn't unless they could see potential $Billions of revenue from an investment that's going to have major continuous costs associated with it. And they won't recoup those costs by charging a couple of dollars for a navigation app, if they charge anything at all.

Apple has never hesitated to spend lots of money when they think they can do it better and provide a more polished experience for their customers. Advertising money has never entered into it.

Recouping costs by charging isn't the point; improving the all over experience is the point.
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post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Apple has never hesitated to spend lots of money when they think they can do it better and provide a more polished experience for their customers. Advertising money has never entered into it.

Recouping costs by charging isn't the point; improving the all over experience is the point.

They don't spend billions to prove a point. They proved themselves a long time ago.

Apple's goal is not providing a more polished experience for their customers as the endgame. It's how they can maximize the profits from their products, charging as much as the market will bear. If those value's can be buried with the retail price of an iPhone then it looks great to the customer. Since they can't charge anymore than they already do, how do you see them recouping the investment of several billion in map creation, correction and updating costs, along with building/updating a navigation solution better than the old pros like Tomtom and Garmin can offer (when they feel like it).

If you're curious about the cost involved with mapping, take a look at Tomtom, Nokia, or Garmin financials. And those costs are for updating and maintaining an existing map and/or building on years of experience with navigation applications, traffic study and reporting and public transit schedules and systems, antenna engineering and user travel preferences and tendencies.

Imagine the costs starting from scratch, then add licensing fees for the associated patents, and for what reason if you already have well-received developer solutions for the same services? Because there's billions in ad revenue that requires specific location and travel for Apple mobile device owners if it's to be attractive to advertisers.
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post #36 of 42
Yes, I guess you're right. Apple would never spend a lot of money to improve their offerings without knowing they could make it back in ads, because that's just how they roll. iTunes? Ad city. iCloud? Ditto. And of course iOS, OS X and Apple's sweeping portfolio of apps don't count because that stuff is cheap to develop, market and maintain. In fact, I think it would be fair to say that Apple's entire business model hinges on using ads to subsidize their investments in user experience. Because they don't really care about user experiences so much as money, and their customers can't tell the difference.

So your'e right, Apple is playing Google's game now, and we can never again take Google to task for being an advertising company, because guess what? So is Apple!
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post #37 of 42
Most or all of the feature requests here are already in Google Maps and Navigation for Android. Excellent voice recognition (100% accurate in six months for me). I just open Nav in the car and speak a place and it starts speaking turn by turn to me. And I don't need to be picky. It's Google. Just a name of something like a state park and that's it. Always gets it. Same thing with points of interest in the immediate area. Google has a great database.

Google Maps in general, however, on the desktop browser has a poor interface IMO. It seems Google lacks cartographers or user interface experts. I mean...the frickin' Google Map has no LEGEND. None. Google it if you don't believe me. Users have had to create unofficial ones. I guess they must have one hidden somewhere, but they ain't sharing it. And the only brilliant thing they had, was 3rd party "mapplets" which were apps that worked on Google Maps, and they killed them last year. They were awesome. Get lat/long, get address at a point, measure distance/area (now in Labs), etc. Display Soil Survey, topo contours of a set interval, etc. I'm still in shock. I used that for work a lot. They were setting themselves up to be the ArcGIS of online mapping. (the standard, in other words). Apple probably has even less cartographers on staff. I hope they channel their philosophy of discoverable interfaces toward mapping. However, I chose my Droid because ironically I found it easier to use and more intuitive than iOS. Particularly the phone part, and the mapping part.

Well...I hope the Google/Apple rivalry produces better mapping products on both platforms. I wish they'd both work more with ESRI, in fact. Actually...whoa. just got a crazy idea. Apple..buys ESRI. That'd be quite the coup. And probably cheaper than the Google buying Motorola deal. Any GIS people here, what do they think of that? Plus, ArcGIS for Mac would be sweet. über sweet. Gatorguy I think you're right. Apple can not make a serious mapping product without buying a mapping company. Perhaps ESRI would be too large and not mesh with Apple, but maybe they could buy Garmin or some other company that is more focused on software. Heh, they should've bought Keyhole.
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"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
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"Overpopulation and climate change are serious shit." Gilsch
"I was really curious how they had managed such fine granularity of alienation." addabox
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post #38 of 42
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Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Yes, I guess you're right. Apple would never spend a lot of money to improve their offerings without knowing they could make it back in ads, because that's just how they roll. iTunes? Ad city. iCloud? Ditto. And of course iOS, OS X and Apple's sweeping portfolio of apps don't count because that stuff is cheap to develop, market and maintain. In fact, I think it would be fair to say that Apple's entire business model hinges on using ads to subsidize their investments in user experience. Because they don't really care about user experiences so much as money, and their customers can't tell the difference.

So your'e right, Apple is playing Google's game now, and we can never again take Google to task for being an advertising company, because guess what? So is Apple!

No need to push it to the exrteme that Apple is all about ads now. I'm not making that claim and you shouldn't understand it that way.

Unlike all the other Apple features you mentioned, maps and navigation depends on location. LBS value depends on knowing where you are, and if an advertiser know where you're going that's a bonus. So Apple wants to know where you are and where you're going too. iCloud or iTunes users have no reason to allow Apple access to that, and they're not going to tell Apple they're on the way to Best Buy. But Apple navigation or maps users could be persuaded. And that's hugely valuable in monetizing LBS and the related ad revenue.

That's why maps and navigation for a company like Apple or Google is all about offering you a cookie (free navigation) in return for sharing where you are and where you go. Google is proof positive of the value.
melior diabolus quem scies
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melior diabolus quem scies
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post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by techno View Post

My wish list
  1. Allow the user to exclude certain roads that the user specifies.
  2. Better user input. Voice recognition would be great. "Route path from home to 36 Elm Street."
  3. Turn by turn audio output that has preference settings that allow user to set frequency of audio outputs. For example, you can tell it to only identify major turns.
  4. Multiple destinations in one route

better integration with search, voice search,
better holders for the phone sideways
while traveling your route , a simple gesture for "facilities at next exit"
my garmin shows me crap behind me, no what's next exit for gas, food make it a preference
i want the least distractions following this thing

integrate voice texting with it
I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
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I APPLE THEREFORE I AM
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post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquatic View Post

Plus, ArcGIS for Mac would be sweet. über sweet.

+1
I'd like to see several GIS/RS software suites have a native Mac version. I hate VM-ing to Win 7 for GIS/RS tasks... (PS - ArcGIS and Erdas Imagine on my new 27" iMac i7 w/ SSD are orders of magnitude faster than on my previous quad xeon Lenovo ThinkStation workstation. It screams! I would be happy to if I never had to log into Windows ever again. But, alas...)

Sorry for the digression....
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