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Apple staffer posing as police allegedly searched home for missing iPhone prototype

post #1 of 194
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The San Francisco Police Department has said it has no record of a formal investigation into yet another missing prototype iPhone. In addition, the man whose home was searched claims people impersonating police offers came into his residence, with evidence suggesting one of the individuals was an Apple-employed "senior investigator" [updated with confirmation of visit from SFPD].

Update: A spokesman for the San Francisco Police Department has now confirmed that police officers were indeed involved in visiting the residence of Sergio Calderón, though he alleges that Apple security officials allowed him to believe that they were also officers when they searched his house.

Local police told San Francisco Weekly they have no record of any police investigation into a lost prototype next-generation iPhone. CNet first claimed on Wednesday that Apple is working with police to recover a missing iPhone prototype allegedly left in a bar in San Francisco's Mission District.

"I don't know who (CNet's) source is, but we don't have any record of any such an investigation going on at this point," San Francisco Police Department spokesman Officer Albie Esparza said.

Esparza went on to share that there are no records of any police visit to Bernal Heights, where the original report claimed officers went to question a man who denied having knowledge of the missing iPhone. Further, there are said to be no records involving the address where police were alleged to have searched for the missing phone.

In a follow-up report, the Bernal Heights man whose home was searched said that six people claiming to be San Francisco Police officers came to his home and allegedly questioned him and searched the premises. They reportedly said they had traced a prototype iPhone to his residence using GPS technology.

"This is something that's going to need to be investigated now," San Francisco Police Department Lt. Troy Dangerfield said, according to the report. "If this guy is saying that people said they were SFPD, that's a big deal."

Sergio Calderon, the 22-year-old Bernal Heights resident, said his home was searched on an evening in July by six people who "threatened" him. He claims four men and two women wearing badges showed up at his door and identified themselves as being with the San Francisco Police Department.

The man said he let the six individuals search his car and his house, and he gave them access to his computer. Calderon said he is an American citizen, but the people who came into his home questioned his citizenship and stated they "were all going to get into trouble."

Calderon said one of the men identified himself as "Tony" and provided a phone number to call if he had further information. When SF Weekly called the number, they reached an Anthony Colon, who reportedly said he is an employee of Apple.

Colon's profile on LinkedIn has since been taken down, but it previously revealed that he is a former San Jose Police sergeant who works as a "senior investigator" at Apple.

Police said they have no record of visiting the bar where another prototype iPhone is claimed to have been lost.

Claims that another iPhone prototype had been lost at a bar came as a surprise this week, as the story is similar to an incident that occurred last year, in which a prototype iPhone 4 was left at a bar. The event caused a media sensation as Gizmodo and its parent company Gawker Media paid $5,000 to obtain the device, which had not yet been publicly announced by Apple.

The two men alleged to have found the prototype iPhone 4 in a separate San Francisco bar last year faces charges of misdemeanor theft. Both of them pleaded not guilty on Thursday, with a trial start date scheduled for November 28.
post #2 of 194
Sounds like a bunch of BS to me.

Apple knows better than impersonating the police.

It is remotely possible that a rogue employee would do something illegal, but that's not Apple's fault. It is far more likely, however, that they'll find that the Tony (Apple employee) is not the "Tony" who searched the house.

Or, even more likely, the entire thing is made up and no one searched anything.
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post #3 of 194
"If this guy is saying that people said they were SFPD, that's a big deal."

He's not kidding. If even a fraction of this is true, Apple is in big trouble.

On the other hand, Sergio Calderon could be lying about the whole incident. But I'm not sure what his motives would be.
post #4 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

"I don't know who (CNet's) source is, but we don't have any record of any such an investigation going on at this point," San Francisco Police Department spokesman Officer Albie Esparza reportedly said.

[...]

In a follow-up report, the Bernal Heights man whose home was searched said that six people claiming to be San Francisco Police officers came to his home and allegedly questioned him and searched the premises. They reportedly said they had traced a prototype iPhone to his residence using GPS technology.

good lord. an sfpd spokesman is now being quoted as "reportedly" having said something?

and the guy whose domicile was searched says that people came into his home and "allegedly questioned him"?

is there no way for you alleged journalist-wannabes to confirm anything you put into an "article"?

i'm going to allegedly start reading appleinsider.com, reportedly.
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post #5 of 194
I would check on the whereabouts of Gizmodo's staff.
post #6 of 194
Could have just been part of REACT - REACT, Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer Team

Hence not technically SFPD strictly.
post #7 of 194
This is a perfect example of why you should never let anyone into your home without calling the police station, with the number in the phonebook, to verify the badge number and location of an officer reputing to have the authority to enter your home. If you have a cell phone or second line, you should also call your lawyer or at least an independent witness to come to the scene immediately.
post #8 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

"If this guy is saying that people said they were SFPD, that's a big deal."

He's not kidding. If even a fraction of this is true, Apple is in big trouble.

On the other hand, Sergio Calderon could be lying about the whole incident. But I'm not sure what his motives would be.

Tellingly, he had the number for "Tony" who happens to have been with Apple security, and whose profile has now been removed? Removed for what reason? Certainly suspicious, and lends credence to the man's claim that he was visited by Apple. Certainly smoke in the air. . .
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post #9 of 194
A story within a story within a story ......
post #10 of 194
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post #11 of 194
Here's a saved image of "Tony's" Linkedin profile, removed after the story broke.

http://forums.macrumors.com/attachme...6&d=1314988362
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post #12 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pooch View Post

good lord. an sfpd spokesman is now being quoted as "reportedly" having said something?

and the guy whose domicile was searched says that people came into his home and "allegedly questioned him"?

is there no way for you alleged journalist-wannabes to confirm anything you put into an "article"?

i'm going to allegedly start reading appleinsider.com, reportedly.

Amen. Totally with you.

I called BS on the unprofessional reporting of this two days ago and I'm calling it again today. Unless this steaming pile of conjecture can be backed up with something verifiable, Apple's lawyers may well have cause to initiate a legal action for defamation.

http://www.eff.org/issues/bloggers/l...ity/defamation

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post #13 of 194
I suspect they were all employees of the "Apple Stoer"[sic] who were deeply interested in getting hold of the lost device.

Then again, it's probably not too hard to lie to CNET, or to say you work for Apple, or to create a bogus LinkedIn profile, etc.
post #14 of 194
So basically, SFPD is now seeking the source of a rumor within another rumor, or is this just another rumor? I'm so confused. lol
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post #15 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSnarkmeister View Post

This is a perfect example of why you should never let anyone into your home without calling the police station, with the number in the phonebook, to verify the badge number and location of an officer reputing to have the authority to enter your home. If you have a cell phone or second line, you should also call your lawyer or at least an independent witness to come to the scene immediately.

You're absolutely right. But take it one step further: without a search warrant don't let them in, period.

I asked a lawyer friend if I could/should call him if I was ever questioned by the police about something. His answer surprised me. "You don't need an attorney if you're being questioned. They'll tell you the same thing I'm telling you right now: don't say anything; don't answer any questions; period."
post #16 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

Amen. Totally with you.

I called BS on the unprofessional reporting of this two days ago and I'm calling it again today. Unless this steaming pile of conjecture can be backed up with something verifiable, Apple's lawyers may well have cause to initiate a legal action for defamation.

http://www.eff.org/issues/bloggers/l...ity/defamation

It would not be the first time that Apple Security has accompanied police officer's in an official (unofficial?) investigation. If there was nothing Apple had to hide, there would be no reason for their Senior Investigator to pull his profile today would there?
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post #17 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Sounds like a bunch of BS to me.

Apple knows better than impersonating the police.

It is remotely possible that a rogue employee would do something illegal, but that's not Apple's fault. It is far more likely, however, that they'll find that the Tony (Apple employee) is not the "Tony" who searched the house.

Or, even more likely, the entire thing is made up and no one searched anything.

I was going to post something about waiting to hear what some people would be willing to say to excuse this intrusion (if it was true). I see we didn't have to wait long.

Sorry Joe, but corporate security searching a private residence is bullshit, no matter how much you try to butter it. If the employee did it as a part of his job, then he isn't a 'rogue' employee. If this is true, Apple is going to be paying through the ass for the invasion of this guys home. And yes, I use the word invasion intentionally.

There are a lot of holes in the story, true. What would make you feel better? if someone bought the device and put picture online as proof? I seem to recall you vilifying Giz over that repeatedly and constantly.

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post #18 of 194
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post #19 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer;

Amen. Totally with you.

I called BS on the unprofessional reporting of this two days ago and I'm calling it again today. Unless this steaming pile of conjecture can be backed up with something verifiable, Apple's lawyers may well have cause to initiate a legal action for defamation.

http://www.eff.org/issues/bloggers/l...ity/defamation

What? They are reporting the story. What the victim is saying, what the SFPD are saying and what Apple is not saying. When news breaks, you report it. You have to use the pat terms to make sure you are not falsely accusing anyone and to make clear that what is being reported is only what is being said You sir need a clue.
post #20 of 194
If this is true... wow. No amount of PR would save Apple from the resulting fallout.
Apple was already caught red handed tracking people's movements and gathering the data without them knowing - so maybe they are brazen enough to impersonate police.

- those who believe the BS PR that it was a programing 'glitch', I suggest you read up on the trial briefings. It was no glitch.
post #21 of 194
Seems Applezilla has the most likely call here so far. Probably a setup by somebody to create some bad Apple news, not necessarily Gizmodo, though.

Gatorguy, check your swallow reflex.

Edit: Looks like Gatorguy has plenty of company here. People, we know nothing about this. Most likely explanation is that it's a hoax to embarrass. Least likely that Apple is sending out cop impersonators.

Applezilla's post is #8.
post #22 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by t0mat0 View Post

Could have just been part of REACT - REACT, Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer Team

That seems like the logical explanation. The same people Apple worked with when the iPhone 4 prototype was stolen.
post #23 of 194
since this is Apple, it's perfectly OK. they have every right to get their property back
post #24 of 194
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post #25 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellacool View Post

What? They are reporting the story. What the victim is saying, what the SFPD are saying and what Apple is not saying. When news breaks, you report it. You have to use the pat terms to make sure you are not falsely accusing anyone and to make clear that what is being reported is only what is being said You sir need a clue.

The reporter is supposed to verify stuff before they print it, by calling witnesses and police themselves. Then they don't need weasel words like "reportedly" and "allegedly" everywhere.
post #26 of 194
For all we know, none of the people in this article even exists.
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post #27 of 194
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post #28 of 194
Um... Duh... Find my iPhone ??
post #29 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

The San Francisco Police Department has said it has no record of a formal investigation into yet another missing prototype iPhone. In addition, the man whose home was searched claims people impersonating police offers came into his residence, with evidence suggesting one of the individuals was an Apple-employed "senior investigator."...

It's worth noting that all of this recent information seems to come from the guy who stole/appropriated the prototype, so it's not likely to be very believable. It sounds remarkably similar to the claims made by the guy that stole the other prototype which were also walked significantly back by the time it all went to court.

If someone is going to steal an iPhone prototype, how stupid and/or unreliable is he likely to be?

It's standard procedure that Apple would hire private investigators in a case like this so that part sounds realistic to me. The investigator could have pretended to be a cop, and that would of course be wrong. It doesn't seem too likely to me though, and if he did in fact do that, he's going to be fired and Apple is likely at enough of a distance from the act to not be liable for whatever some private detective did or didn't do.

I think it likely that the investigator merely implied they were police and that the idiot thief is just panicking and saying stuff that he believed to be true but isn't actually true. Remember that the detective/investigator is well aware of the law and where the line is in regards what he can say or do and the thief is likely not.
post #30 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

"If this guy is saying that people said they were SFPD, that's a big deal."

He's not kidding. If even a fraction of this is true, Apple is in big trouble.

On the other hand, Sergio Calderon could be lying about the whole incident. But I'm not sure what his motives would be.

Maybe Sergio is trying to sell clicks for his blog?

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post #31 of 194
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post #32 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post

Seems [BApplezilla[/B] has the most likely call here so far. Probably a setup by somebody to create some bad Apple news, not necessarily Gizmodo, though.

Gatorguy, check your swallow reflex.

My father was a police officer. He felt that when presented with conflicting stories, the most simple explanation was generally the one closer to the truth. It seems you'd find a secret plan by CNET and others to plant a bogus Apple Investigator profile on Linkedin, invent a bogus story about a missing iPhone some months later, bribe some guy to claim his home was invaded by Apple security personnel and possible posing as police officers, then tell the fake Apple Investigator to pull his profile to add to the suspicions, to be more believable than Apple actually looking for a lost phone, leaving no rock unturned.
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post #33 of 194
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post #34 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii;

The reporter is supposed to verify stuff before they print it, by calling witnesses and police themselves. Then they don't need weasel words like "reportedly" and "allegedly" everywhere.

Wow, the level of ignorance is astounding. How do you verify what someone said? The victim said this occurred, read his mind, polygraph? Really? Have you read the story, they did call the police and the police said they have no knowledge. So they should now polygraph the police? news is just that news and they are reporting it. It is up to the reader to determine how much of it, if any, they choose to believe. It is apparent though that some people do not have the brain capacity to make this determination and needs everything spelled out, cross checked, verified, proofed and blessed off by god before it is released So maybe sometime next year when the iPhone 6 comes out we may have this story.
post #35 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez;

As long as we're being very careful in our fact-finding, did you come across some clear evidence that this man actually stole the phone, or did you mean to include "allegedly"?

Funny how so many here can pick fly shit from pepper to defend Apple, but will damn others to jail time and even hell itself with nothing more than the loosest of rumors.

Thank you.
post #36 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

It's worth noting that all of this recent information seems to come from the guy who stole/appropriated the prototype, so it's not likely to be very believable. It sounds remarkably similar to the claims made by the guy that stole the other prototype which were also walked significantly back by the time it all went to court.

If someone is going to steal an iPhone prototype, how stupid and/or unreliable is he likely to be?

A few days ago nearly every regular here who offered an opinion said they didn't believe there ever was a missing iPhone didn't they? Now Apple security is looking for a phone that wasn't ever missing to begin with? I'll say it again.: There's a lot of smoke hanging in the air. That doesn't mean there's a fire, but it does mean you should look.
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post #37 of 194
wow if this was indeed true, then that's very serious. he has crossed the line.
post #38 of 194
The article doesn't state whether or not the cops (or guys saying they were cops but lying) produced a warrant when they showed up at his door. Whether it was the real cops or not, this guy should never have let them in the door or even answered a single question if they did not produce a warrant. Even if they DID have a warrant (which would have meant they were real law enforcement of SOME kind, otherwise the warrant would be a forgery, and that's a pretty deep rabbit hole), that still doesn't mean he had to answer any questions. Know your rights people! I'm sure it would be suuuuuper intimidating if you're a person who's never had a run in with the law in any way before and had a gang of guys, not just one guy, show up at your door, but you've got to try to keep your wits about you and stick by your guns in these situations. If there's no warrant, then do NOT allow any entry into my home, or the searching of anything. And if they don't place you under arrest, don't answer ANY questions. Of course, even if they do arrest you, don't answer any questions until you've got a lawyer physically with you, not just on the phone, and even then, let him do the talking. Basically, even if you're an innocent law abiding citizen, it's in your best interest to have an absolute "screw all police" attitude.

If these guys misrepresented themselves, and even if they are real law enforcement working in conjunction with apple security guys, but not in any way part of the SFPD, and they DID indeed say they were SFPD, then the shit will hit the fan. That's super duper felony stuff right there on top of a gigantic civil case. The shit will roll UPhill, and just like the Murdoch phone hacking stuff in the UK, the public will NOT believe that the Apple higher ups did not know anything about it.

All in all, still not enough information to come to any conclusions yet.
post #39 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode View Post

Apple was already caught red handed tracking people's movements and gathering the data without them knowing

That is a gross misrepresentation of what actually happened. But please, keep repeating the position of the misinformed, that way, people will know to ignore your posts.

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post #40 of 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

My father was a police officer. He felt that when presented with conflicting stories, the most simple explanation was generally the one closer to the truth. It seems you'd find a secret plan by CNET and others to plant a bogus Apple Investigator profile on Linkedin, invent a bogus story about a missing iPhone some months later, bribe some guy to claim his home was invaded by Apple security personnel and possible posing as police officers, then tell the fake Apple Investigator to pull his profile to add to the suspicions, to be more believable than Apple actually looking for a lost phone, leaving no rock unturned.

Becareful there.......you are starting to make too much sense.....

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