or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › RFID chips could be an airplane 'black box' for Apple's future iPhones
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

RFID chips could be an airplane 'black box' for Apple's future iPhones

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Future iPhones equipped with near-field communication technology could store vital information that would allow for hardware failure to be quickly diagnosed by Apple, even after the handset is nonfunctional.

The concept, much like a durable "black box" found in an airplane that stores crucial data in the event of a crash, was revealed this week in a new patent application published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Discovered by AppleInsider on Thursday, it is entitled "RFID Circuitry and Methods of Using the Same to Provide Information of Events Pertaining to an Electronic Device."

The proposed invention notes that radio-frequency identification (RFID) circuitry can be used in a variety of different methods, and gives examples of it being utilized with highway tolls, inventory management, badge entry, public transportation, and wireless transactions.

In those examples, RFID circuitry in a device, like an iPhone, provides information to an RFID reader. But that information is usually "fixed," sharing information that does not usually change, such as a credit card number or unique identifier.

Apple's proposed invention would use RFID circuitry to selectively provide different, dynamic information as needed. In this way, the data being shared by an RFID chip in an iPhone could be modified to communicate variable information.

In the most obvious examples, the data shared could be basic information like the last song played on an iPhone, or a notification to an external reader that a new text message has been received. But Apple could also employ RFID to retrieve information from an iPhone with hardware that is no longer operational.

The filing goes on to describe how the RFID circuitry could share with an external reader any "events" that may have occurred within the device. In one example, a "trigger event" could be detected by a sensor like a water detection system.

Other examples include a shock detection system in the event that an iPhone is dropped, an electrical failure detection system to record circuitry problems, and a general security system that could potentially detect general tampering with the device.



By using passive RFID circuitry, an iPhone could wirelessly provide NFC data even when it is powered off, disabled, or operating in a low-power state.

"This enables the device to provide passive messages without incurring any substantial energy cost," the filing reads. "For example, if the device has been damaged, the RFID circuitry can provide a message indicating that it has been damaged even though the device is no longer functional."

Apple's system would include a variety of potential event scenarios stored on the device. This way, the system could more quickly select an appropriate message to broadcast over RFID before a device becomes nonfunctional.

The application, disclosed this week, was first filed in March of 2010. It is credited to Tyler Mincey and Andrew Hodge.

Apple's interest in RFID technology has been well-documented, though most evidence of NFC chips potentially appearing in an iPhone have been related to more conventional uses of the technology, like e-wallet transactions or tag readers. But the company's latest proposed invention represents a more unique application of RFID technology in mobile devices.
post #2 of 20
...while Google keeps buying patents.
post #3 of 20
I'm sure there is some good to come from this patent.
I suspect, however, that this will be a good source of warranty repair refusals in the future, too.
And after the "saving map data" fiasco, I can hardly wait to see the kinds of lawsuits that will happen if the RFID chip winds up saving any data that can be used to determine any sort of user behavior of the device's owner. If something like this actually happens (and no telling if it will), Apple had better be careful.
post #4 of 20
No thanks, no need for big brother RFID/NFC spy chips in everything!

read http://spychips.com

also see the free documentary movie covering this topic -- America: Freedom to Fascism: http://freedomtofascism.com

Keep the spirit of 1776 ALIVE!
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhyde View Post

I'm sure there is some good to come from this patent.
I suspect, however, that this will be a good source of warranty repair refusals in the future, too.

If you damage or tamper with your phone, you deserve a refusal. Heck you agreed to it in those terms you didn't bother to read first

Quote:

And after the "saving map data" fiasco, I can hardly wait to see the kinds of lawsuits that will happen if the RFID chip winds up saving any data that can be used to determine any sort of user behavior of the device's owner. If something like this actually happens (and no telling if it will), Apple had better be careful.

given that no one could get that not always accurate info without your phone or computer, was it really that major a deal. Seems more like something the blogs hyped up to pull hits.

Plus do you really think apple cares that you visit porn sites all day. Not really.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

No thanks, no need for big brother RFID/NFC spy chips in everything!

read http://spychips.com

also see the free documentary movie covering this topic -- America: Freedom to Fascism: http://freedomtofascism.com

Keep the spirit of 1776 ALIVE!

Huh? If you are aware of the presence of these chips in communications devices, you have the choice to use or not use them. You are confusing government mandated chip inclusion with competitive pressures driving the inclusion of these extras. Don't be confused.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #7 of 20
You 1984ites need to calm down.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

No thanks, no need for big brother RFID/NFC spy chips in everything!

read http://spychips.com

also see the free documentary movie covering this topic -- America: Freedom to Fascism: http://freedomtofascism.com

Keep the spirit of 1776 ALIVE!

Just because you suffer from paranoia doesn't mean people aren't actually out to get you.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools." Douglas Adams

Reply

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools." Douglas Adams

Reply
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

a general security system that could potentially detect general tampering with the device.

[/url][/c]

Jailbreak detection!

Before everyone bitches Apple should not have to support Jailbroken phones anymore than one dropped in the pool or toilet, run over by an auto or having been used as a chew toy by one of my Uncles 80+ pound bulldogs.

Just one of those 5 dogs can turn a dish remote control into an avant grade piece of art or worthless piece of shit in less than 20 seconds - he has one working one with 4 tv's and a pile of 7-8 mangled clickers.

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by kriskkalu View Post

...while Google keeps buying patents.

It's cute, but inaccurate. Google has its own share of patents. In fact, some of their patents are fundamentally more significant than what Apple has. This is no slight against Apple. But they innovate at different levels.
post #11 of 20
Genius Bar guy: "Aha. I see that you installed Redsnow exactly 11.3 seconds before your iPhone became nonfunctional. You know where the door is. Buh bye."

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

It's cute, but inaccurate. Google has its own share of patents. In fact, some of their patents are fundamentally more significant than what Apple has. This is no slight against Apple. But they innovate at different levels.

I bet Google has quite a portfolio of search-related patents. Too bad it's not "open".

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

If you damage or tamper with your phone, you deserve a refusal. Heck you agreed to it in those terms you didn't bother to read first

Or if a software bug causes bad data to be recorded (sort of like the one that didn't clear out the user's position in the map info fiasco)?


Quote:
given that no one could get that not always accurate info without your phone or computer, was it really that major a deal. Seems more like something the blogs hyped up to pull hits.

Plus do you really think apple cares that you visit porn sites all day. Not really.

Keep in mind that with RFID, *anyone* (not just Apple) with physical proximity to the device might be able to read it.
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

I bet Google has quite a portfolio of search-related patents. Too bad it's not "open".

Making one product of your company open does not mean you have an obligation to open it all.

If it does then I believe you need to speak with Apple as well.

http://developer.apple.com/opensource/

http://www.opensource.apple.com/
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

You 1984ites need to calm down.

The resident Zealot has spoken - everyone bow and back away slowly.
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mode View Post

The resident Zealot has spoken - everyone bow and back away slowly.

I don't know why, but it makes me laugh without fail every single time one of you trolls calls ME a 'fanboy' or a 'zealot'.

I mean, I love humor based on nonsense, so that might be it, but you'd think I'd get used to it by now.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #17 of 20
Realism is not paranoia -- stop your obfuscation.

Next thing you will tell us is that the Founders suffered from paranoia that King George wanted to enter homes with officer self-written warrants. I think you might want to bone up on your history and become more worldly in your understanding.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

Just because you suffer from paranoia doesn't mean people aren't actually out to get you.
post #18 of 20
Huh?! When next to everything carries these tracking chips, where will the choice be? Granted it is not the case today, but this is the trajectory and huge risks to liberty. You forget that many companies have a revolving door between the private sector and government!


Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Huh? If you are aware of the presence of these chips in communications devices, you have the choice to use or not use them. You are confusing government mandated chip inclusion with competitive pressures driving the inclusion of these extras. Don't be confused.
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

Huh?! When next to everything carries these tracking chips, where will the choice be?

NOT. BUYING. AN IPHONE.

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply

Originally posted by Marvin

Even if [the 5.5” iPhone exists], it doesn’t deserve to.
Reply
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhyde View Post

Or if a software bug causes bad data to be recorded (sort of like the one that didn't clear out the user's position in the map info fiasco)?


the whole map thing is moot. they don't look at that data in regards to warranty status or repairs.

Quote:
Keep in mind that with RFID, *anyone* (not just Apple) with physical proximity to the device might be able to read it.

Encryption. Same thing that keeps me from reading the diag info on your phone right now.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › RFID chips could be an airplane 'black box' for Apple's future iPhones