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iPhone, iPad now represent 83% of WiFi mobile devices as PCs shift into minority use

post #1 of 63
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Statistics published by Boingo Wireless, the largest WiFi provider worldwide, shows mobile devices are now leading conventional notebooks among airport WiFi hotspot users, and that the majority of those mobile devices are running Apple's iOS.

The company's WiFi Snapshot report notes that smartphones and tablets now make up 58.9 percent of all devices using the company's networks installed within 60 airports in North America and Europe and 400,000 other WiFi hotspots globally.

Among those mobile devices, iOS makes up 83 percent of the traffic. The firm said Android has tripled its share from last year "but is still a distant fourth place to iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch devices."

"Given the latest numbers, I think it's safe to say 2011 is the year Wi-Fi became an essential part of mobile Internet connectivity," Dawn Callahan, the vice president of consumer marketing for Boingo Wireless said.

"Since the launch of the iPhone in June 2007, we've seen a marked growth trend for non-laptop devices, but the exponential growth in iPhones and iPads in the last year pushed mobile devices past laptops, showcasing just how disruptive the trend is."
post #2 of 63
I understand why there are less "PCs' being used at airports, but where are the damn Android-based devices that are apparently so much more popular with users than anything Apple makes.
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post #3 of 63
I'm surprised at the low numbers for Android devices, in relation to its alleged marketshare.

Are these corporate devices, locked down and not used for airport web-surfing (i.e., personal web-surfing)?
post #4 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I understand why there are less "PCs' being used at airports, but where are the damn Android-based devices that are apparently so much more popular with users than anything Apple makes.

Popular because of low price... but suspect the average user can't make them work in that kind of environment so they don't get recorded.

On the other hand perhaps they all have 4G and don't need to connect to WiFi...
post #5 of 63
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post #6 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I understand why there are less "PCs' being used at airports, but where are the damn Android-based devices that are apparently so much more popular with users than anything Apple makes.

Phandroids thinks what's good for them MUST be good for everyone else, regardless of how every single report showing the contrary says.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrtotes View Post

Popular because of low price... but suspect the average user can't make them work in that kind of environment so they don't get recorded.

On the other hand perhaps they all have 4G and don't need to connect to WiFi...

Over the weekend, a friend approached me frustrated that he could not get his new Android tablet working on our public WiFi. He's not tech-savvy. iPad was too expensive so he got suckered into buying some cheap, chinese, 7" plastic iPad knockoff (brand new) from the Internet for $60.

It was the biggest pile of $h!t I've come across. Nothing worked. The build quality was horrendous, and it required tapping the screen with the force of a sucker-punch in order for it to register anything on the touchscreen.

We must have spent 30 minutes trying to get it connected to our WiFi. I gave up. I pulled out my iPad and got on in seconds. The online retailer offered to return it but has to pay $54 in shipping to return it. So he essentially has a doorstop.

This is exactly why I hate all that Android crap. It's becoming the PC paradigm where everyone races to the bottom and the customer gets screwed. Then, it makes the tablet industry look bad in general even though Apple had nothing to do with it.

Shame on people for continuing this garbage mentality and for hating Apple for smacking them in the face. These folks deserve it.
post #7 of 63
post #8 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I understand why there are less "PCs' being used at airports, but where are the damn Android-based devices that are apparently so much more popular with users than anything Apple makes.

It could be demographics (Android appeals to poor folks), and the survey is based on world data as well (Android is more popular in the US than in Europe and US residents don't leave the country as much anyway).

Android users are notably more conservative also. Maybe they are just too paranoid to give their credit card to the Airport people?
post #9 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Many Android devices ship with apps to become a wifi hotspot themselves, so the odds of needing Android to connect to one of those expensive airport connections is relatively low.

Edit: should have read the byline and not wasted my time reading another Digler invention.

Your argument makes sense in the context of iPod T's and iPads. But iPhones?

Furthermore, on a given trip, you likely need to data-roam at one or more airport, regardless of whether you have iPhone or Android. Boingo is a cheaper option.
post #10 of 63
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post #12 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Android users are notably more conservative also. Maybe they are just too paranoid to give their credit card to the Airport people?

Most airports I've been in had free WiFi.

edit: Looks like this is a charged service so what other explanation is there expect that Android users are cheap.
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post #13 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Many Android devices ship with apps to become a wifi hotspot themselves, so the odds of needing Android to connect to one of those expensive airport connections is relatively low.

Edit: should have read the byline and not wasted my time reading another Digler invention.

iOS devices ship with the ability to become a wifi hotspot themselves, so the odds of needing iOS to connect to one of those expensive airport connections is relatively low.

Edit: should have read the poster's name and not wasted my time replying to another MacRulez' pointless whine.
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post #14 of 63
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post #15 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

It could be demographics (Android appeals to poor folks), and the survey is based on world data as well (Android is more popular in the US than in Europe and US residents don't leave the country as much anyway).

Android users are notably more conservative also. Maybe they are just too paranoid to give their credit card to the Airport people?

Good arguments!
post #16 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Most airports I've been in had free WiFi.

Not in the US, unfortunately, though that tide has been turning recently.
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post #17 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Many Android devices ship with apps to become a wifi hotspot themselves, so the odds of needing Android to connect to one of those expensive airport connections is relatively low..

Can Android-created wifi hotspots only connect to other Android phones?
post #18 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Is Boingo among the providors of free wifi at airports?

At least at some airports.
post #19 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Many Android devices ship with apps to become a wifi hotspot themselves, so the odds of needing Android to connect to one of those expensive airport connections is relatively low.

Edit: should have read the byline and not wasted my time reading another Digler invention.

That makes no sense...

The ability to share one's 3G/4G connection as a hotspot has almost zero impact on a device's likeliness to itself connect to Airpot Wi-Fi. If you had 3G, you would either use that or Wi-Fi; what does turning into a hotspot have to do with anything? MAYBE if someone had an Android hotspottable phone AND a Wi-Fi only tablet, one could make the argument that their tablet no longer needs to use airport Wi-Fi (?!?!). Am I missing something?

In any case, the iPhone can be used as a hotspot since iOS 4.3.
post #20 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

If your phone's signal is good why would you pay extra for wifi at an airport?

Data roaming more expensive than Boingo fee
post #21 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Is Boingo among the providors of free wifi at airports?

Time for you to wander off to the next thread and be passive-aggressive.

Your arguments have been totally demolished.
post #22 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Most airports I've been in had free WiFi.

edit: Looks like this is a charged service so what other explanation is there expect that Android users are cheap.

I was being (slightly) funny in my remarks also. They are generalisations of course and really just wild guesses.

It is true though that a lot of "free" Wi-Fi zones still requires a log-in and giving them a credit card number too. At least that's the case at a lot of hotels and airports I've been in.
post #23 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I understand why there are less "PCs' being used at airports, but where are the damn Android-based devices that are apparently so much more popular with users than anything Apple makes.

This fits perfectly in with my theory that most Android users are cheapskates and they only use their phone because they got it cheap or for free.

Such poverty stricken and technically ignorant people are also less likely to travel and embark on vacations to foreign destinations and that's why we are seeing such results.

When I flew to an international destination this summer, there were plenty of people on my flight using iPads, including me.
post #24 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Most airports I've been in had free WiFi.

Your experience is atypical, at least for US airports.

I fly well over 100,000 miles covering at least 50 segments a year. It's actually fairly unusual when I find an airport with free WiFi. Probably considerably less than 25% of US airports.

Most of my foreign travels have been to third world countries in the past few years, so I hesitate to generalize there.
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post #25 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I understand why there are less "PCs' being used at airports, but where are the damn Android-based devices that are apparently so much more popular with users than anything Apple makes.

I suspect the activation figures increment every time an Android reboots.
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post #26 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Edit: should have read the byline and not wasted my time reading another Digler invention.

DED is legendary for his brand of pseudo-journalism.

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post #27 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Many Android devices ship with apps to become a wifi hotspot themselves, so the odds of needing Android to connect to one of those expensive airport connections is relatively low.

Edit: should have read the byline and not wasted my time reading another Digler invention.

I don't get it. When I'm at an airport, I usually don't have 3G, because data roaming is ridiculously expensive abroad. So if I would want a data connection on my phone or on my iPad, it would have to go through some kind of wifi service like Boingo. How would 'an app that turns my phone into a Wifi hotspot' help with this, except when I have multiple devices with me that I want to tether through this wifi hotspot?

Unless I'm missing something, you make no sense.
post #28 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

If your phone's signal is good why would you pay extra for wifi at an airport?

Because for many people, data plans are not unlimited. When I'm on a layover at an airport and want to do some heavy duty web surfing or movie streaming, ala Netflix, I'll go for the WiFi instead of 3G.

Thompson
post #29 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by d-range View Post

I don't get it. When I'm at an airport, I usually don't have 3G, because data roaming is ridiculously expensive abroad. So if I would want a data connection on my phone or on my iPad, it would have to go through some kind of wifi service like Boingo. How would 'an app that turns my phone into a Wifi hotspot' help with this, except when I have multiple devices with me that I want to tether through this wifi hotspot?

Unless I'm missing something, you make no sense.

He didn't make sense at all, even for someone like me who doesn't travel abroad. Whether roaming or not, many 3G data plans (iPad, most iPhone) don't have unlimited data. So I'll try to attach to WiFi whenever I can find it. Plus WiFi is generally faster than 3G unless the WiFi provider is not well equipped to support the actual load. (I find Boingo comes up lacking fairly often, BTW.)

Now if I happened to be sitting by the other guy, and he happened to have his tethering turned on, perhaps I could secretly hack into it and burn HIS bytes. He could sit there all happy thinking he was right. Win/win.

Thompson
post #30 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Your experience is atypical, at least for US airports.

I fly well over 100,000 miles covering at least 50 segments a year. It's actually fairly unusual when I find an airport with free WiFi. Probably considerably less than 25% of US airports.

Most of my foreign travels have been to third world countries in the past few years, so I hesitate to generalize there.

25% is about right according to my travels.

Thompson
post #31 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

It is true though that a lot of "free" Wi-Fi zones still requires a log-in and giving them a credit card number too. At least that's the case at a lot of hotels and airports I've been in.

Not sure I've ever been asked for a cc for free access in any hotel or airport that offers free wifi....

And if they asked for it - they wouldn't get it.
post #32 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinman0 View Post

Not sure I've ever been asked for a cc for free access in any hotel or airport that offers free wifi....

And if they asked for it - they wouldn't get it.

Nor have I. I couldn't name one instance.

Thompson
post #33 of 63
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post #34 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I was being (slightly) funny in my remarks also. They are generalisations of course and really just wild guesses.

It is true though that a lot of "free" Wi-Fi zones still requires a log-in and giving them a credit card number too. At least that's the case at a lot of hotels and airports I've been in.

ReallY? As I said, I travel over 100,000 miles and 50 flight segments a year. Probably 50 nights in hotels or more. And I have NEVER seen one ask for a credit card for free WiFi access.
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post #35 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Your experience is atypical, at least for US airports.

I fly well over 100,000 miles covering at least 50 segments a year. It's actually fairly unusual when I find an airport with free WiFi. Probably considerably less than 25% of US airports.

Most of my foreign travels have been to third world countries in the past few years, so I hesitate to generalize there.

I don't travel the US that much but I can't recall the last time I had to pay at an airport.

Here is an article from 2010 talking about the growth of free airport WiFi...

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/colum...rt-wi-fi_N.htm Here is a list of airports that offer free WiFi. I can't vogue for it's completeness but all the airports I travel to are on the list…

http://www.wififreespot.com/airport.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

ReallY? As I said, I travel over 100,000 miles and 50 flight segments a year. Probably 50 nights in hotels or more. And I have NEVER seen one ask for a credit card for free WiFi access.

I think he means "open" WiFi as opposed to "free" access, which is how all "paid" WiFi networks work.
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post #36 of 63
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post #38 of 63
All the Android companies and devices together get lumped together to make fourth place, but Apple gets sliced into three--and each slice is still big enough to take one of the top 3 spots? Seems unfair... Android should be given SECOND place after iOS’s very large first place
post #39 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I understand why there are less "PCs' being used at airports...

Unless the PCs are an indistinguishable stream gushing out of computer factories, I believe you mean 'fewer' PC's...
post #40 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Assuming your question is in earnest, no, using an Android device as a wi-fi hub is pretty much like any other wifi hub, usable by any wifi-enabled device. I use mine to connect my Linux laptop when I'm on the road.

In fact, my phone came with two apps preinstalled so it can be used as a wifi hub or directly tethered via USB.

Then, you could perhaps explain why Android market share would be higher (since iPhone users can be in on it too)?

Oh, the question is in earnest. (Not even sarcastic unlike the last time!)
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