or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Bill Buxton of Microsoft Research calls Steve Jobs' patents a lesson for CEOs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bill Buxton of Microsoft Research calls Steve Jobs' patents a lesson for CEOs - Page 2

post #41 of 52
In a secret meeting, Mr. Ballmer hastily asks that his name be placed on several Microsoft patents. He doesn't care which. Something technological sounding.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

In a secret meeting, Mr. Ballmer hastily asks that his name be placed on several Microsoft patents. He doesn't care which. Something technological sounding.

Sad but quite likely true.

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply

Please update the AppleInsider app to function in landscape mode.

Reply
post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

That's your problem, not the grammar cop's, no?

*sb; grammar cops'
post #44 of 52
did anyone else read this thinking the whole time that he was thinking "(unlike ballmer)" ?
post #45 of 52
I admit that typos in the articles bug me too, but I highly doubt that any posters or forum moderators have the ability to change the typos. So what's the point of pointing out the errors on here? On each and every article, however, there is an email link to the author. Bugging the author over and over again about his typos (instead of fellow forum users) might have a bit more effect.
post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by BestKeptSecret View Post

I was wondering when you'd show up. I was missing you.


Well, here's hoping that your aim soon gets better. .....
Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
Reply
Apple, bigger than Google, ..... bigger than Microsoft,   The universe is unfolding as it should. Thanks, Apple.
Reply
post #47 of 52
Not only was it Jobs innovation and ideas that drove products, but the way that Apple operates internally (which is not like other companies) that helped propel it to astonishing success.

Other companies should look seriously at how Apple grew into the largest company in the world, in short order, at the helm of Steve Jobs.

Memo to CEOs: Think Different was not just a marketing slogan.
post #48 of 52
Someone should forward a link to Christopher Hawthorne, the architecture critic of the L.A. Times. He was trying to build a case that Jobs was positioning himself as the designer of his new building. This testimony from a competitor should carry some weight. I can clearly see Steve acting as curator of the design process of this building. Since such a role by a CEO is rare, I can see how Hawthorne could misinterpret it.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Psych_guy View Post

I was watching the Walt Disney special the other evening on MSNBC and they way described Walt was the way people have described Steve Jobs and it occurred to me that Steve is the Walt Disney of his day in his field. Total visionary, total control, megalomaniac, but in the end he knows what scores, and he isn't without some failures, but never let that get him down.

I had exactly the same thoughts while watching the Disney doc too.

Disney was way ahead of his time. He didn't invent animation or the theme park, or even the cutting edge equipment they used (multi-plane camera, etc.), but he put these things together in an innovate way that gave his audience/guests a superior experience.

Disney had an enormous number of critics and naysayers, but he fundamentally knew what he wanted to do and how it could be successful.
post #50 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Grammar cops are more irritating than typos.

ah come on do not pick on the guy, this is all he can do is pick out someone obvious typo, if he did not do this he would not being any value to the world.
post #51 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

That's your problem, not the grammar cop's, no?

As an aside, there's nothing wrong with demanding - no, expecting - that a high-profile, widely-quoted outlet like AI aspire to write better. Better writing (incl. the right grammar, not having typos, good punctuation, etc) is not uncorrelated with clearer thinking.

Actually studies have shown most people of average intelligence can read through some horrific typos and bad grammar and still understand what is being said and communicated. Unlike making math mistake which the majority of populations make most times and there is no way to know for sure it was a mistake or not.

Why is it a few people demand that people spell correctly and not make typo or use some sort of grammar convention they like verse chastising people for making a math or scientific mistake.

So did the typos change the outcome of the article, did people take different actions because of the typos, how did your life change because of typo.

Sorry to everyone else to the off topic diversion.
post #52 of 52
deleted
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Bill Buxton of Microsoft Research calls Steve Jobs' patents a lesson for CEOs