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Apple sued over microprocessor patents; Mass. to investigate iTunes fraud

post #1 of 41
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Apple has been hit with a new patent infringement suit accusing it of infringing three patents related to microprocessors. Also, the attorney general of Massachusetts has said that her office will look into complaints about fraudulent purchases on Apple's iTunes Store.

Via Technologies sues Apple

Apple is accused of violating microprocessor technology patents owned by Via Technologies in a lawsuit filed this week, according to Bloomberg. The suit, issued in federal court in Wilmington, Delaware, seeks to prohibit Apple from selling what it believes are offending products: the iPhone and iPad.

Via Technologies is a semiconductor company based out of Taipei, Taiwan. It seeks a jury trial.

"The products at issue generally concern microprocessors in a variety of electronic products such as certain smartphones, tablet computers, portable media players and other computing devices," the complaint reportedly reads.

Apple began designing and using its own custom processor last year with the introduction of the ARM-based A4 CPU in the first-generation iPad, and later in the iPhone 4 and fourth-generation iPod touch. This year, Apple released a successor, the A5, which is found in the iPad 2, and is expected to power Apple's fifth-generation iPhone.



Massachusetts attorney general to investigate iTunes scams

Martha Coakley, attorney general of Massachusetts, was recently the victim of identity theft, as her stolen credit card was used to make unauthorized purchases on Apple's iTunes Store. That helped convince her to look into the issue, according to Threat Post.

Coakley revealed her own plight this week in statements made at an address to the Massachusetts Advanced Cyber Security Center. She said her office will be looking into the issue and "demanding answers" from Apple, which has not commented on the issue.

The attorney general said the fraudulent use of her credit card was detected when the purported thieves attempted to purchase a computer from Dell. However, "a slew" of fraudulent transactions allegedly went through Apple's iTunes Store without issue.

While Coakley's specific situation is related to identity theft, fraud on iTunes has been a persistent issue over the years, as iTunes accounts have credit card information tied to them. While there is no evidence that Apple's servers have been compromised, users do fall victim by having weak passwords, allowing outsiders to hijack their account.

Attention on the issue prompted Apple to bolster security for Apple ID accounts, requiring that customers verify their account information when they log into new devices. In addition, requirements for new iTunes account passwords were changed, and must now be at least 8 characters with mixed capitalization.
post #2 of 41
For an oft-quoted blog, AI does precious little research into any of the featured stories.

Instead of rephrasing entire articles by others, is there any chance any of the writers here could actually make a phone call to get some original interviews? That would be a real shocker.

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post #3 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


Instead of rephrasing entire articles by others, is there any chance any of the writers here could actually make a phone call to get some original interviews?

Not so long as readers keep clicking at an acceptable rate on the rehash articles. Readers are the product sold by AI, not stories.
post #4 of 41
Well, when you get the be the world number one it seems that everyone wants a piece of your pie.

Apple has had processors built based on licenses from ARM. I wonder how other ARM licensees sit in respect to VIA's complaint.
post #5 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple has been hit with a new patent infringement suit accusing it of infringing three patents related to microprocessors. Also, the attorney general of Massachusetts has said that her office will look into complaints about fraudulent purchases on Apple's iTunes Store.

Via Technologies sues Apple

Apple is accused of violating microprocessor technology patents owned by Via Technologies in a lawsuit filed this week, according to Bloomberg. The suit, issued in federal court in Wilmington, Delaware, seeks to prohibit Apple from selling what it believes are offending products: the iPhone and iPad.

Via Technologies is a semiconductor company based out of Taipei, Taiwan. It seeks a jury trial.

"The products at issue generally concern microprocessors in a variety of electronic products such as certain smartphones, tablet computers, portable media players and other computing devices," the complaint reportedly reads.

Apple began designing and using its own custom processor last year with the introduction of the ARM-based A4 CPU in the first-generation iPad, and later in the iPhone 4 and fourth-generation iPod touch. This year, Apple released a successor, the A5, which is found in the iPad 2, and is expected to power Apple's fifth-generation iPhone.

Yet another non-issue for Apple. If it is the ARM processor, Apple has a license to use it. If the license is invalid, Apple probably has recourse against ARM. If it was a different processor, then the processor manufacturer would likely indemnify Apple.

That is, unless Apple's attorneys are idiots - and we know that not to be the case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Massachusetts attorney general to investigate iTunes scams

Martha Coakley, attorney general of Massachusetts, was recently the victim of identity theft, as her stolen credit card was used to make unauthorized purchases on Apple's iTunes Store. That helped convince her to look into the issue, according to Threat Post.

Coakley revealed her own plight this week in statements made at an address to the Massachusetts Advanced Cyber Security Center. She said her office will be looking into the issue and "demanding answers" from Apple, which has not commented on the issue.

The attorney general said the fraudulent use of her credit card was detected when the purported thieves attempted to purchase a computer from Dell. However, "a slew" of fraudulent transactions allegedly went through Apple's iTunes Store without issue.

While Coakley's specific situation is related to identity theft, fraud on iTunes has been a persistent issue over the years, as iTunes accounts have credit card information tied to them. While there is no evidence that Apple's servers have been compromised, users do fall victim by having weak passwords, allowing outsiders to hijack their account.

Attention on the issue prompted Apple to bolster security for Apple ID accounts, requiring that customers verify their account information when they log into new devices. In addition, requirements for new iTunes account passwords were changed, and must now be at least 8 characters with mixed capitalization.

Idiot. He lost his credit card. It has been known for years that if you lose your credit card, someone can use it. If he reported the theft to the credit card company, he's already protected.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #6 of 41
so why isn't the AG checking into why my card information got stolen by a waiter at Chili's.

Sound like the AG is using his power to for personal gain here. sounds like conflict of interest.
post #7 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Yet another non-issue for Apple. If it is the ARM processor, Apple has a license to use it. If the license is invalid, Apple probably has recourse against ARM. If it was a different processor, then the processor manufacturer would likely indemnify Apple.

That is, unless Apple's attorneys are idiots - and we know that not to be the case.



Idiot. He lost his credit card. It has been known for years that if you lose your credit card, someone can use it. If he reported the theft to the credit card company, he's already protected.

I realize it was a quick blurb you made, but if you are going to call a person an idiot, you might want to at least pay attention to obvious context clues like "Martha", "she", and "her".
post #8 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post

Well, when you get the be the world number one it seems that everyone wants a piece of your pie.

Apple has had processors built based on licenses from ARM. I wonder how other ARM licensees sit in respect to VIA's complaint.

You are assuming the claim is about what Apple license from ARM, it could be any number of things in the processor they are claiming IP on it may have nothing to do with the ARM architecture.
post #9 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Idiot. He lost his credit card. It has been known for years that if you lose your credit card, someone can use it. If he reported the theft to the credit card company, he's already protected.

What about "Martha Coakley" makes you think it's a dude?

That said, SHE is an idiot, and as someone from MA who's all too familiar with her track record, I'm not psyched about her using her own issues to spark an investigation. Even though I highly doubt Apple is responsible for the fraud, $100 says her iTunes password is "Password"....
post #10 of 41
What a pathetic woman.

People do get their credit cards stolen from time to time, and it's only just an issue right now because it happened to her?

And she is going to waste precious resources and tax payer money just to investigate a tiny, personal matter? She's not acting in anybody else's best interest. Like many politicians, she's just looking out for herself.
post #11 of 41
"her stolen credit card

Shortest investigation ever
post #12 of 41
Perhaps now we are seeing why Martha Coakley wasn't elected to the Senate. It seems like this investigation is a bit too personal. Would she have investigated had she not had her credit card information taken? Likely it was the card company, not Dell, who flagged the fraudulent activity. A few $1-5 purchases on iTunes might not be enough to trip the card issuer's fraud detectors.
post #13 of 41
I, through my daughter, had two types of fraud occur within days of each other. Apple is currently investigating.

1) some one purchased a free game using her account. She got an email informing her a different device than her computers had been used for this transaction, but the Apple process didn't allow the transaction to be stopped, nor did it identify what device was used. Gets more interesting, in that the game that was purchased was actually attributed to a third person who did dispute the (non) charge.

2) the $100 back to school gift card she received from Apple, had previously been used by someone else. Apple initially scolded my daughter for buying a gift card from a sleazy discount broker, and suggested that she take the matter up with the credit card company to dispute the charge.

When I finally got involved, i suggested to Apple that these issues might reflect an inside job.
post #14 of 41
Via used to make some chipsets for DOS machines back in the 80s

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post #15 of 41
The attorney general of Massachusetts is becoming unreasonable with the incident of her lost credit card. This incident must be reported to the credit company at once. If she will investigate the fraud happening in Apple, it must be purely professional and not personal.
post #16 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Not so long as readers keep clicking at an acceptable rate on the rehash articles. Readers are the product sold by AI, not stories.

You know, you could always find another forum to loath.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #17 of 41
Last I checked, VIA make x86 compatible CPUs, not ARM. This will be over rather quickly.

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post #18 of 41
No wonder Coakley couldn't beat Brown in Mass - how can she fail to understand why her bank didn't flag a $1 virtual download purchase versus a $500+ durable goods purchase with a billing/shipping mismatch? If every single purchase was flagged, the use of credit cards would grind to a halt.
post #19 of 41
There's some additional detail on VIA and what they may be claiming over at Gigaom.

http://gigaom.com/apple/apples-a4-an...n-new-lawsuit/
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post #20 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

For an oft-quoted blog, AI does precious little research into any of the featured stories.

Instead of rephrasing entire articles by others, is there any chance any of the writers here could actually make a phone call to get some original interviews? That would be a real shocker.

Tell you what: you make those phone calls and post the result on the forums. Deal?

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #21 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by starnyc View Post

No wonder Coakley couldn't beat Brown in Mass - how can she fail to understand why her bank didn't flag a $1 virtual download purchase versus a $500+ durable goods purchase with a billing/shipping mismatch? If every single purchase was flagged, the use of credit cards would grind to a halt.

Yup. iTunes has simply become the new gas station in the credit card fraud game. It used to be that someone with your stolen credit card number would first go to a pay-at-the-pump gas station to verify the card was still working (no face-to-face with a casher, no one to confiscate your card if it's rejected, no drawing attention to yourself). Then if buying a couple bucks of gas was successful, they'd go make a bigger purchase. Next time they want to use the card, again first go to the gas station to make sure it hasn't been reported as stolen yet. This was a known pattern credit card companies started to watch for to detect fraud.

Now the thieves are simply using iTunes instead of going to the gas station. How is Apple at fault for this? Apple doesn't know if the person is then making purchases elsewhere. There's no pattern of behavior for Apple to watch for. The credit card companies and the consumer themselves are the only ones in a position to see this happening.
post #22 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Tell you what: you make those phone calls and post the result on the forums. Deal?

Ummm... yeeeaahh.... the news website *reader* should do the journalistic research, but the news *website* shouldn't?

Wow, that's just.....idiotic.
post #23 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

For an oft-quoted blog, AI does precious little research into any of the featured stories.

Instead of rephrasing entire articles by others, is there any chance any of the writers here could actually make a phone call to get some original interviews? That would be a real shocker.

The entire News Industry does very little investigation and draws from AP/Reuters/UPI.
post #24 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

There's some additional detail on VIA and what they may be claiming over at Gigaom.

http://gigaom.com/apple/apples-a4-an...n-new-lawsuit/

There was no new information. It was just a repackage from other sites.

Perhaps they could actually link to the court filing?
post #25 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Yup. iTunes has simply become the new gas station in the credit card fraud game. It used to be that someone with your stolen credit card number would first go to a pay-at-the-pump gas station to verify the card was still working (no face-to-face with a casher, no one to confiscate your card if it's rejected, no drawing attention to yourself). Then if buying a couple bucks of gas was successful, they'd go make a bigger purchase. Next time they want to use the card, again first go to the gas station to make sure it hasn't been reported as stolen yet. This was a known pattern credit card companies started to watch for to detect fraud.

Now the thieves are simply using iTunes instead of going to the gas station. How is Apple at fault for this? Apple doesn't know if the person is then making purchases elsewhere. There's no pattern of behavior for Apple to watch for. The credit card companies and the consumer themselves are the only ones in a position to see this happening.


yep, very true, and happen to the wife card and after the gas station purchase the CC company shut our card off, which piss the wife off since she was traveling at that time. Thieves just found a new way to check if the card number is valid anymore and apple is the target. The only question is if a number of different itune accounts use the same number within a short period of time. Not sure if Apple does a cross check to see if another account is using the same CC number. That could be the only way apple could address this issue since most CC # which are stolen are sold many times over especially when they work.
post #26 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

Yup. iTunes has simply become the new gas station in the credit card fraud game.... There's no pattern of behavior for Apple to watch for. The credit card companies and the consumer themselves are the only ones in a position to see this happening.

This. Reading the original story includes this gem: "Coakley said her office was pursuing a "common sense" approach to enforcement and notification."

Martha, don't let your office have all the fun! How 'bout you pursue some of that "common sense" for yourself?
post #27 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

There's some additional detail on VIA and what they may be claiming over at Gigaom.

http://gigaom.com/apple/apples-a4-an...n-new-lawsuit/

That website was right that X86 and ARM processors used different technologies all together, but claim that it could be low power change that apple deployed and VIA may have used in the X83 chips, as everyone know X86 Intel technologies are power hogs that is also why apple chose not to use the Intel parts on the iProducts.
post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane Boxyroom View Post

The attorney general of Massachusetts is becoming unreasonable with the incident of her lost credit card. This incident must be reported to the credit company at once. If she will investigate the fraud happening in Apple, it must be purely professional and not personal.

Perhaps she should looking into why her bank cleared use of the card by someone else. Because if they cleared it as okay, how is Apple supposed to know she didn't give the card to someone else to use
post #29 of 41
Chen Wen-Chi (CEO of VIA) is married to Cher Wang the Chairperson of HTC. Apple is HTCs biggest competitor. Hmmmm
post #30 of 41
deleted
post #31 of 41
deleted
post #32 of 41
We just had our cards stolen. After they had success at gas stations, they tried the Sony store, the apple store (not iTunes), lenova, a jeweler in RI. They got my wife's visa and am exp cards. Am exp cards have different numbers, but somehow they got my number as well (probably from receipts in the car with the last 4 numbers). I got an email from am exp querying the lenova purchase; they said they had also flagged the Sony and apple store charges (these are still listed as pending, with a $1 charge). The jeweler from RI actually called me to check.

They are trying to get stuff they can easily fence.

Is the AG confusing the apple web store with iTunes?
post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

Sound like the AG is using his power to for personal gain here. sounds like conflict of interest.

Attorney generals, and prosecutors are some of the least responsible of all government officials. They regularly bring legal action to promote themselves to move up the political ladder. Personal gain seems to be the only reason some of these people are even in the positions they are in.
post #34 of 41
Why roll in a story about a stupid attorney general with one about a patent case? The Via story could have been developed into something more interesting. For example discussion of the patents involved.

I have to agree with others this article is to much regurgitation and to little effort.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by waldobushman View Post

I, through my daughter, had two types of fraud occur within days of each other. Apple is currently investigating.

1) some one purchased a free game using her account. She got an email informing her a different device than her computers had been used for this transaction, but the Apple process didn't allow the transaction to be stopped, nor did it identify what device was used. Gets more interesting, in that the game that was purchased was actually attributed to a third person who did dispute the (non) charge.

2) the $100 back to school gift card she received from Apple, had previously been used by someone else. Apple initially scolded my daughter for buying a gift card from a sleazy discount broker, and suggested that she take the matter up with the credit card company to dispute the charge.

When I finally got involved, i suggested to Apple that these issues might reflect an inside job.

\\ Having five children, the youngest now a teen, I would suggest that the more likely culprit is a friend? getting her password and the gift card details at the same time. As with stolen CC mentioned here, the free game is a test, the gift card the real fraud. Have her think about when she showed ppl the gift card, every kids phone has a camera,
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Yet another non-issue for Apple. If it is the ARM processor, Apple has a license to use it. If the license is invalid, Apple probably has recourse against ARM. If it was a different processor, then the processor manufacturer would likely indemnify Apple.

That is, unless Apple's attorneys are idiots - and we know that not to be the case.

Your expert legal opinion? Surely Via's attorneys have thought of that?



Quote:
Idiot. He lost his credit card. It has been known for years that if you lose your credit card, someone can use it. If he reported the theft to the credit card company, he's already protected.

Perhaps you're not aware, but the issue of fraudulent iTunes transactions with little response from Apple has been going on for well over a year.
post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by igxqrrl View Post

Perhaps you're not aware, but the issue of fraudulent iTunes transactions with little response from Apple has been going on for well over a year.

Could it be that her statement regarding the office investigating the matter could mean a larger look at the problem as a whole and what can be done to increase security of personal information for all and not just an investigation of her particular case?

It seems to me that a Fraudulent iTunes purchase isn't quite accurate here. Yes iTunes fraud if gift card numbers are hacked or an iTunes account is hacked - but this is a case of Fraudulent (or the very least unauthorized) use of a credit card which just so happened to be conducted through the iTunes store. as mentioned it could have happened anywhere. and as for Dell raising an alarm but Apple not - the amount of the transaction likely was a factor. Then again - if someone used my credit card number to create a new account from a device which has never been authorized before then a check might be nice. Not that I am suggesting Apple should have no concern and do no checking but can you imagine the nuisance it would be if you got a phone call or email to verify every 99 cents you spend?

I did get a call once from a credit card company to verify that I had made a purchase. In contrast my sister-in-law did NOT get a call when someone used her credit card to buy plane tickets and ski rentals despite those purchases putting the card well over its limit.
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

Could it be that her statement regarding the office investigating the matter could mean a larger look at the problem as a whole and what can be done to increase security of personal information for all and not just an investigation of her particular case?

It seems to me that a Fraudulent iTunes purchase isn't quite accurate here. Yes iTunes fraud if gift card numbers are hacked or an iTunes account is hacked - but this is a case of Fraudulent (or the very least unauthorized) use of a credit card which just so happened to be conducted through the iTunes store. as mentioned it could have happened anywhere. and as for Dell raising an alarm but Apple not - the amount of the transaction likely was a factor. Then again - if someone used my credit card number to create a new account from a device which has never been authorized before then a check might be nice. Not that I am suggesting Apple should have no concern and do no checking but can you imagine the nuisance it would be if you got a phone call or email to verify every 99 cents you spend?

I did get a call once from a credit card company to verify that I had made a purchase. In contrast my sister-in-law did NOT get a call when someone used her credit card to buy plane tickets and ski rentals despite those purchases putting the card well over its limit.



I would suggest your sister-in-law change CC companies then, we get calls from time to time on our own transactions especially when they are outside out buying habits. There are times the wife and I are both traveling at the same time and use the CC at about the same time in two locations and we get a call to make sure they are ours. Some CC companies do this to make sure it is you verse fraud transaction.
post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Tell you what: you make those phone calls and post the result on the forums. Deal?

Why should I make those calls? Am I running my own rumor/news web site?

It would do wonders for AI's credibility and newsworthiness and I'm sure I wouldn't be the only one who notices.

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post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

The entire News Industry does very little investigation and draws from AP/Reuters/UPI.

But they also PAY for those news services. AI gets a free ride by merely switching around a sentence here and there and calling it their own. I think they can do better. Otherwise, they should merely provide the links and stop the spin and interpretation on these stories. We've seen many times stories here that were "repackaged" and consequently loaded with errors.

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