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Given a choice, 46% of Citrix employees picked Macs

post #1 of 39
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As an increasing number of Information Technology departments allow employees to choose what devices to use, a big percentage are picking Apple gear. Citrix reports that about 460 of a thousand workers in its program selected Macs.

A report by the New York Times profiling the trend toward companies' support of "bring your own device" policies noted that Apple's iPhone, iPad and MacBooks have "made major inroads" into the enterprise.

In contrast, companies like Dell, HP, and RIM that previously maintained a lock on the purchasing decisions of large companies through tight relationships with IT staff are now losing out, experiencing "stagnant or sinking" sales.

"This retreat is occurring because many of those companies are finding they just arent that good at selling to consumers," the report stated, citing Barclays Capital analyst Ben Reitzes as saying, "You can basically outsource your I.T. department to Apple."

Reitzes added, "what youre seeing is that Apples approach is winning, and it is tough for the others to keep up."

Companies save money in offering employees choice

In early 2010, AppleInsider profiled a "bring your own computer" program initiated by Kraft that allowed employees to pick the system they wanted to use, as long as it met certain minimum requirements.



The Times described the program as being favorably received by employees, and further noted similar shifts occurring at companies like Netflix and Citrix, the latter of which reported that when given a choice, 46 percent picked Macs.

"That was a little bit of a surprise," reported Paul Martine, the chief technology officer of Citrix. The company makes software that enables computing clients to access externally-hosted Windows applications on both Mac OS X and iPads. That in turn has helped Apple to find even greater adoption among other companies dependent upon Windows software.

Citrix reported that its "choose your own hardware" program has saved the company about 20 percent on each notebook computer over the past three years.

Not all choices equal

Many companies are not open to supporting just any hardware that workers might own. The report specifically named Wells Fargo Bank as stating that its employees are not allowed to connect to corporate networks with their personal devices.

However, the bank's chief information officer Jim Spicer did note that it has "expanded the choice of corporate-owned devices that it issues to employees to include more consumer-oriented products," saying "the biggest challenge we have today is making sure that we dont chase every device that comes along."

That gives Apple an advantage with the iPad that it won't necessarily lose to other makers that make similar but less established or mature products, like Samsung's Galaxy Tab or Motorola's Xoom tablet.
post #2 of 39
The PC era is over. A Mac is NOT a PC. Nor was an Apple ][.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Personal_Computer

edit.. 'PC' is a marketing term originated by IBM and not to be confused (although that was the intention at the time) with the term Apple had pioneered 'personal computer'. I add this to avoid people wasting their time pointing out Apple used the term 'personal computer. first. I know! I said 'PC'!
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post #3 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

The PC era is over. A Mac is NOT a PC. Nor was an Apple ][.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Personal_Computer

Are you sure that a Mac is not a PC.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh
post #4 of 39
not officially, but we are looking at virtual desktop solutions which is a pre-cursor to bring your own equipment to work.

you get a virtual windows 7 instance on vmware or hyper-v or citrix. whichever platform we end up buying. probably vmware since they have clients for iOS and Android. you can access it on whatever computer you buy yourself
post #5 of 39
wish my employer had a program like this....
post #6 of 39
I think the Citrix receiver app is superior on Android than iOS.
post #7 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

I think the Citrix receiver app is superior on Android than iOS.

does it support xendesktop 6.5?

citrix looks nice but very expensive compared to vmware. hyper-v is a no go until windows 8
post #8 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

The PC era is over. A Mac is NOT a PC. Nor was an Apple ][.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Personal_Computer

Here's an Apple ][ ad, and Apple calls their machines the hottest personal computers. They also call it the most personal computer.

post #9 of 39
I'm the only one in the company using a Mac (2011 MBA) at work. Just hooked it up to my new Thunderbolt LED Cinema Display.

The network administrator basically told me I was on my own and refused to support me. I said no problem. He's a hardcore Linux guy. Our network runs Win2k3 w/AD.

3 years of using a mac here in the office, he finally bought an Macbook Pro, and an iPad. Hell froze over. His rationale was that he might as well start learning how to use them since it seems everyone is using some kind of Apple product nowadays.. very true. In the back of my mind, I think he just liked how slick my workstation is and that in the three years of using it, I never once had to ask him to resolve a problem with it.

'nuff said.
post #10 of 39
Misleading summary of the NYT article.

It is clear from the NYT article that the small departments who have this option are the tech types, not your common users. Cmon, Kraft foods has more than 800 employees, right?

Also, if you read the original article carefully, it appears that these BYOD programs are probably opt-in. Thus the 46% who chose Apple may be only the percentage of the users who opted into the BYOD program to get their choice of hardware, and possibly OS. There are likely many more who opted out and accepted a standard company-provided wintel device. I cannot imagine they force every employee to shop for their own hardware and get it serviced on their personal time.

Does anyone have more definitive info about whether these programs are opt-in?

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post #11 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I'm the only one in the company using a Mac (2011 MBA) at work. Just hooked it up to my new Thunderbolt LED Cinema Display.

The network administrator basically told me I was on my own and refused to support me. I said no problem. He's a hardcore Linux guy. Our network runs Win2k3 w/AD.

3 years of using a mac here in the office, he finally bought an Macbook Pro, and an iPad. Hell froze over. His rationale was that he might as well start learning how to use them since it seems everyone is using some kind of Apple product nowadays.. very true. In the back of my mind, I think he just liked how slick my workstation is and that in the three years of using it, I never once had to ask him to resolve a problem with it.

'nuff said.

I'm in a roughly analogous situation. I fought incredibly hard to get the right to use a Mac at work, and now that I've managed to show IT that their fears about having a Mac on the company network were unfounded, there appears to be a light at the end of the tunnel for other people in my company who would like to use a Mac at work. I wonder how many of us "green shoots" there are in companies around the world. It's not inconceivable that we may reach a tipping point within the next year or two and see a wave of Macs invading businesses.
post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

Misleading summary of the NYT article.

It is clear from the NYT article that the small departments who have this option are the tech types, not your common users. Cmon, Kraft foods has more than 800 employees, right?

Does anyone have more definitive info about whether these programs are opt-in?

The Citrix program is only for certain employees & departments, not all. According to WIkipedia as of 12/2009, Citrix had 4800 odd employees, that number has definitely grown in the almost 2 years since that figure.

Given the 4800 number, 460 choosing Macs is actually a little over 10% of employees, definitely not close to half the employees.
post #13 of 39
post #14 of 39
It is starting all over again, back in the 80's Apple strategy was not to come in the front door and convince IT department to replace what they had like Mainframes or Mini-mainframes, they let users do it for them. As Apple exited the 80's large Fortune 500 companies began the switch over from whatever they had to Apple because employee were bringing in their mac to work, you remember the original all in one mac with a handle on it. Then it all fell apart and companies switch to windows.

I think more and more companies will not have a choice to make the change, as CEO and other important people in the company who have clue start demanding the IT depart to support apple products.

The company I work for now is the only company that never allowed me to use my Macs. One company I world for did not stop me but heavy discourage anyone from using mac, their IT policy was they would not support any support calls you had if they knew you had a mac. No big deal I support myself, others brought in their mac too and mostly supported themselves too. Then the IT tried to convince management that macs were bad and required special support. Well the mac user asked how many support calls they got from any of us mac users over the 2 or 3 years they claim it was an issue for them. The answer was like 10 calls from about 100 users compared to the thousands of calls they got from the 1000 employees on Windows and Unix machine. management, than asked why they could not convert the other 1000 employees to mac, the IT department was not looking too good at that point.
post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

As an increasing number of Information Technology departments allow employees to choose what devices to use, a big percentage are picking Apple gear. Citrix reports that about 460 of a thousand workers in its program selected Macs.

I suspect that this underestimates demand for Macs.

Most of these programs give the employee a fixed stipend. So if, as people here argue, Macs are more expensive, it actually costs the employee more of their own money to choose a Mac.
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post #16 of 39
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post #17 of 39
I love the bit where you get to buy your own computer for your employer's use. With a stipend, admittedly, but people actually *wanting* this kind of arrangement tells me the world is on its head.
post #18 of 39
My biggest struggle isn't the machine that I use at work, although I'd prefer to use my Mac so I didn't have to switch back and forth. My issue is the corporate image and group policies they push tend to break more things than if they let Windows Update run. I just received a policy update last week that disabled plug-ins in IE. As a result, half of the company sites are missing content, not to mention external sites.

So, I'll live with the company-issued Windows 7 machine (keep your XP/Vista to yourself), just keep your policies and third party software (do I really need 5+ third party applications running in the background for features that are baked right into Windows???) to yourself.
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Windows: 86.58%
Mac: 5.62%
http://www.netmarketshare.com/os-mar...e.aspx?qprid=9


Desktop: 92.88%
Mobile: 7.12%
http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_vs...-201008-201108


Yep, PCs are doomed.

Oh look the trollZZZ are out!

It is entirely possible that one way to understand the idea of the PC era being over, is that there is now viable choice available. You don't need a PC now, but can use one, or a Mac, or a phone, or a tablet. Thus the "PC only" era is threatened. Your numbers don't show that, they show the reality of the past.

The day Ford made the model T the horse and buggy era was over. But the horse and buggy numbers still took a while to lay down and die...
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post #20 of 39
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post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Here's an Apple ][ ad, and Apple calls their machines the hottest personal computers. They also call it the most personal computer.


Funny that ad was produced before typesetting on a computer was developed. The type in that ad is awful.

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post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Actually, they show only the reality of the present ...

Actually, didn't I just read the Mac marketshare in the US just hit 15%?

http://osxdaily.com/2011/03/18/mac-m...a-14-and-more/

Bascially, Apple's numbers here in the US have doubled over the past two-three years.
post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjbruce View Post

My biggest struggle isn't the machine that I use at work, although I'd prefer to use my Mac so I didn't have to switch back and forth. My issue is the corporate image and group policies they push tend to break more things than if they let Windows Update run. I just received a policy update last week that disabled plug-ins in IE. As a result, half of the company sites are missing content, not to mention external sites.

So, I'll live with the company-issued Windows 7 machine (keep your XP/Vista to yourself), just keep your policies and third party software (do I really need 5+ third party applications running in the background for features that are baked right into Windows???) to yourself.

I feel your pain, every time they push down those update my work PC gets slower and slower. I use to runs a program that allow you to manage and kill certain processes like SVC or what ever the name was which allow remote management. I use to have it kill that process all them time so I never got the updates and such and my system ran so much better but ran in to a problem once when I missed and update and it caused all sort of other problem since I missing the update.
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

It just wouldn't be a visit to AI without random name-calling. Thanks for making my day complete.


Actually, they show only the reality of the present (unless you want to pick fly shit from pepper and note that the stats ended on Aud 31 rather than Sept 26).

Both Mac and Linux have celebrated their 20th birthdays. The option to ditch Windows has been just as readily available for decades as it is today.

And yes, people keep writing about how the new tablet form factor will replace laptops, but note just how few of those articles were actually written on a tablet....

Your history speaks for you...

While I love the "fly shit" reference, whatever it is supposed to mean, the fact that other systems existed is not the same as their being a valid choice. Neither the date of the numbers you give nor their inaccuracy are the problem. I am just pointing out that they fail to look forward.

Again, the model T ended an era, even before the first one sold. Other cars were "choices" before that. But not a valid choice for most people. For many reasons. The same was true of both Macs and Linux until very recently, still is true for most people. Yet the direction is obvious, and more important than the location (numbers) will be in the long run.
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post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by eacumm View Post

Are you sure that a Mac is not a PC.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh

Yep totally. You confuse the term Personal Computer with the IBM marketing name 'PC' as in 'XT' etc.
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post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Funny that ad was produced before typesetting on a computer was developed. The type in that ad is awful.

It sure is bad! Pre BBDO. Helvetica bold and Garamond 80% condensed as the Apple corporate look wasn't there yet.
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post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post

Here's an Apple ][ ad, and Apple calls their machines the hottest personal computers. They also call it the most personal computer.


Show me where it says 'PC'

'IBM PC' was coined by IBM long after the Apple ][ made the phrase 'personal computer' well known. I repeat a Mac is and never has been a 'PC'. Funny how the trick IBM used still works today.

That was an Apple /// screen on the optional stand for the ][e jfyi.


p.s. This is crucial knowledge for being a true Apple fan
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post #28 of 39
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post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOROM View Post

Misleading summary of the NYT article.

It is clear from the NYT article that the small departments who have this option are the tech types, not your common users. Cmon, Kraft foods has more than 800 employees, right?

Also, if you read the original article carefully, it appears that these BYOD programs are probably opt-in. Thus the 46% who chose Apple may be only the percentage of the users who opted into the BYOD program to get their choice of hardware, and possibly OS. There are likely many more who opted out and accepted a standard company-provided wintel device. I cannot imagine they force every employee to shop for their own hardware and get it serviced on their personal time.

Does anyone have more definitive info about whether these programs are opt-in?

Does not article's title states "GIVEN A CHOICE, 46% of Citrix employees picked Macs"?
Where the hell DED says it is 46% of all employees? How is it misleading then?
post #30 of 39
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post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Yep totally. You confuse the term Personal Computer with the IBM marketing name 'PC' as in 'XT' etc.

IBM PC = International Business Machine Personal Computer no matter how you slice it, sliced bread is still bread.
post #32 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

Apple's certainly made big gains with OS X in recent years, but it's unclear how that blog came up with their numbers.

They cite StatCounter as their source, yet when we go to StatCounter directly we see a very different picture, with Mac OS at 6.28%:
http://gs.statcounter.com/#os-ww-monthly-201008-201108

You have to change the Country/Region to United States of America. 6.28% is worldwide.
post #33 of 39
I can tell this is a pro-apple site because in my opinion a pro PC site would say...

"Given a choice, 54% of Citrix Employees picked PCs."
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbdragn View Post

The Citrix program is only for certain employees & departments, not all. According to WIkipedia as of 12/2009, Citrix had 4800 odd employees, that number has definitely grown in the almost 2 years since that figure.

Given the 4800 number, 460 choosing Macs is actually a little over 10% of employees, definitely not close to half the employees.

READ THE ARTICLE for what it says not what you want to interpret from it. The article says "
Citrix reports that about 460 of a thousand workers in its program selected Macs.
. There is no other information given so keep your ASSumptions to yourself. Is the program currently in place and are all new purchases part of this program? I don't know and i'd imagine neither do you.

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post #35 of 39
I've suffered through 20 yrs of corporate supplied PCs
Windows 3.1
Windows 95
Windows 98
Windows NT4
Windows XP
Windows 7
on IBM, Dell and HP boxes

do you really think I'd choose another windows box?
Nooo chance.
post #36 of 39
I'm a CCEA and I work for a Citrix partner. When I brought my Mac in to do a demo, our previous Citrix rep mentioned the BYOD program and that many users were choosing Macs. Apparently, they had the idea that if the person was a part owner of the computer, they'd take better care of it. I'm getting a lot of requests to replace token-based security for SMS-based security on phones partially paid for by the employer. The rationale for the change is the same it's cheaper to subsidize a personal phone that the person will take extra care of than to buy them a security token.

Apple's making a lot of inroads into the enterprise realm...

At my last Citrix training session, the instructor was shocked when not more than half of the trainees didn't have Macs. Apparently, most of the IT staff they see are Mac users. At Summit, they had to make special announcements when labs weren't iPad compatible.

I went to a meeting recently and almost everyone took notes an iPad. At another meeting, the IT director said, "I don't understand why management wants to set up XenApp to work with iPad". I picked up my iPad and showed him I was logged into a XenApp system checking on performance.

At Synergy, Citrix demonstrated <a href="http://www.citrix.com/tv/#videos/4198">XenDesktop for Mac OS Snow Leopard/Lion</a>, so expect more Mac OS X in the enterprise.
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by veblen View Post

You have to change the Country/Region to United States of America. 6.28% is worldwide.

Correct.

What I find as a mutual opportunity is for the big Linux Vendors ala Red Hat, Ubuntu, SuSE, etc., to develop Cloud Services and distributed GPGPU services and much more that work in parallel with OS X.

If Linux ever wants a chance to eat away at Microsoft they'll have to do this or they will continue to hibernate in the Server backend.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhead View Post

wish my employer had a program like this....

Mine does
(typing this a 27" iMac )
post #39 of 39
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