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Apple working to secure worldwide cloud-music rights ahead of Oct. 4

post #1 of 21
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Apple is far along in negotiations to obtain international cloud-music licenses from record companies and publishers, a new report claims, and may secure a deal in time to announce it at the company's iPhone event on Oct. 4.

CNet's Greg Sandoval reports that Apple is looking to obtain similar licenses to the ones it obtained for iCloud, the company's upcoming cloud services initiative, in the U.S., according to sources familiar with the discussions. Though nothing has been decided yet, Apple is said to be close to reaching deals.

Sandoval noted that Apple would announce an international option for next Tuesday's press event if iTunes managers are able to "wrap up negotiations in time." Apple on Tuesday invited members of the press to a "Let's talk iPhone" event scheduled for 10 a.m. Pacific on Oct. 4.

The Cupertino, Calif., company is expected to unveil the fifth-generation iPhone next week, while also highlighting the upcoming release of iCloud and iOS 5. Evidence suggests that the so-called "iPhone 5" will launch soon after, possibly on Oct. 14.

iCloud is Apple's effort to simplify content and information management across devices by storing the data online, or "in the cloud." The service includes re-architected versions of former MobileMe services such as Contacts, Calendar and Mail, access to App Store and iBookstore purchases and automatic backups of iOS devices.

The bulk of Apple's negotiations with international music rights holders is likely related to the company's forthcoming iTunes Match service. For $24.99 per year, users will be able to use the service to have their iTunes libraries scanned and matched up to iTunes Music Store offerings. Matched songs will then be automatically available in iCloud. The current iTunes Match beta is only available in the U.S.



Though Apple was rumored to have negotiated cloud-based streaming music rights for iCloud, the feature was not announced at the company's June unveiling of the service. The beta version of iTunes Match initially appeared to support instantaneous playback from iCloud, but Apple quickly clarified that users still need to "keep stuff on their machine in order to play it," eventually removing the feature.

Apple is betting heavily on iCloud driving the new "PC-free" features in iOS 5 that will allow iPhone and iPad users to sync their devices without the aid of a Mac or PC. The company admitted in June that its previous MobileMe service was not its "finest hour." Former CEO Steve Jobs was reportedly furious at the MobileMe team in 2008 for botching the product's launch. In fact, MobileMe experienced widespread outages on Thursday, prompting speculation that Apple is preparing for an imminent transition to iCloud.

While taking the wraps off of iCloud at this year's Worldwide Developer Conference, Jobs promised that his company would learn from its mistakes and build iCloud so that it "all just works."

On Friday, Apple preemptively sent out "Welcome to iCloud" emails to customers with a link to instructions to get them "up and running in no time." Those instructions, however, are not yet available.
post #2 of 21
With Amazon ramping up with multimedia tablet and Spotify having a sizeable fanbase outside the US this is would seem to be an important focus for securing your HW platforms for the future.
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post #3 of 21
might have to buy into this. someone i know has a 65GB music collection and i might have to set up a lunch date to trade music
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

might have to buy into this. someone i know has a 65GB music collection and i might have to set up a lunch date to trade music

So you don't obtain your music legally?
post #5 of 21
Have I got this right?

iTunes Match means I pay Apple $24.99 a year for the privilege of listening to a poorer quality, abridged version of my own iTunes library ‽

I'll pass on this one.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

Have I got this right?

iTunes Match means I pay Apple $24.99 a year for the privilege of listening to a poorer quality, abridged version of my own iTunes library ‽

I'll pass on this one.

I understand that the iTunes Match version of your music will be streamed to you at 256kbs AAC, so unless you have a high quality spectrum analyzer built into your inner ear, you won't be able to tell one bit of difference. In fact, most people will hear a better quality version. And abridged? Explain.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings View Post

I understand that the iTunes Match version of your music will be streamed to you at 256kbs AAC, so unless you have a high quality spectrum analyzer built into your inner ear, you won't be able to tell one bit of difference. In fact, most people will hear a better quality version.


The high quality spectrum analyzer built into my inner ear is currently on the blink, but music on my iPod Classic still sounds superior to that on my iPod Touch.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Wings View Post

And abridged? Explain.

Lots of the music in my iTunes Library isn't available in the iTunes store so can't be 'Matched'; the library of music I would have access to would be an abridged version of that currently available on my iPod Classic. And I'd have to pay to listen to it.

As I already said; no thanks
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

Lots of the music in my iTunes Library isn't available in the iTunes store so can't be 'Matched'; the library of music I would have access to would be an abridged version of that currently available on my iPod Classic. And I'd have to pay to listen to it.

As I already said; no thanks

Only if you do not pay apple their 25 dollars. Otherwise the I-Tunes match will upload those tracks that are not in the store.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol_prior View Post

Only if you do not pay apple their 25 dollars. Otherwise the I-Tunes match will upload those tracks that are not in the store.

Oh right; thanks for that, I hadn't realised that it would upload those tracks.

I have no objection to paying the $25; I've been paying more than that for years for mac.com/mobileme, it's just that I don't see the point in paying again for something I already have for free.

For as long as is possible I'll stick to storing my music on the iPod Classic and listen to superior quality audio that is accesible even when Wi-fi isn't.
post #10 of 21
This has disaster written all over it. They haven't sealed this yet? If that MobileMe crash Thursday night is shades of things to come Apple's cloud looks like a dark one. Say what you will of Amazon but execpt for 1 hiccup they've got it up and ready for the Kindle Fire.
post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

Have I got this right?

iTunes Match means I pay Apple $24.99 a year for the privilege of listening to a poorer quality, abridged version of my own iTunes library ‽

No.
If the files are not on your computer/iDevice, you can download it to that device. And you don't have to use iTunes match to upload your own library nor do you have to use iTunes match (if you have it) for every song in your library, even if it is in the store.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_bundy View Post

might have to buy into this. someone i know has a 65GB music collection and i might have to set up a lunch date to trade music

You are nothing but a troll pure and simple. I wish they would ban you, as your comments are never relevant and just take up space. At least I can put you on my ignore lists. done
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post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

You are nothing but a troll pure and simple. I wish they would ban you, as your comments are never relevant and just take up space. At least I can put you on my ignore lists. done

There's nothing off-topic or trollish about his comment at all

Yes, he's a terrible pirate, and yes, he needs to shut up and buy his crap, but that's not trolling.

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post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

There's nothing off-topic or trollish about his comment at all

Yes, he's a terrible pirate, and yes, he needs to shut up and buy his crap, but that's not trolling.

I stand corrected, he is not really a troll. He just likes to constantly make assinine comments that add nothing to a conversation. I do however still believe that his post about trading pirated music with his friend was off topic and in poor taste.
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

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Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
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post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by iKol View Post

This has disaster written all over it. They haven't sealed this yet? If that MobileMe crash Thursday night is shades of things to come Apple's cloud looks like a dark one. Say what you will of Amazon but execpt for 1 hiccup they've got it up and ready for the Kindle Fire.

It was never ever announced that they had the worldwide rights to this, in fact given the feudalistic way music rights are held, per country, I never expected them to. Now, however, I expect them to get it right for most "tier-1" countries. Like the UK. Whoooop!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

Oh right; thanks for that, I hadn't realised that it would upload those tracks.

I have no objection to paying the $25; I've been paying more than that for years for mac.com/mobileme, it's just that I don't see the point in paying again for something I already have for free.

For as long as is possible I'll stick to storing my music on the iPod Classic and listen to superior quality audio that is accesible even when Wi-fi isn't.

Good for people with the iPod classic, which is about as expensive as an iPhone. But everything else is wrong.

1) The tracks are the highest you can get on iTunes. If you had inferior versions - as many of us do- they will be replaced with better versions.
2) Its not at all clear you can stream music, but you can download for sure. So you dont need wifi after the set up.


iTunes match is huge. There are more iTunes users than iPhone users, as far as I know. Once people with a large iTunes collection, or a collection transferable to iTunes, see their friends play anything in their collection, at any time, as a stream then their next purchase is likely an iPhone.
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post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post


Good for people with the iPod classic, which is about as expensive as an iPhone.


Apple Store UK, iPod Classic £198; iPhone 4 £428 - £612

Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

1) The tracks are the highest you can get on iTunes. If you had inferior versions - as many of us do- they will be replaced with better versions.
2) Its not at all clear you can stream music, but you can download for sure. So you dont need wifi after the set up.

1) I've not questioned the quality of the downloads, more the sound quality of the iPod Touch vs the iPod Classic with EQ.

2) I'm not getting this at all. If my 15,000 songs won't fit on an iPod Touch now, how will they do so by downloading them using iTunes Match ? If it can't do that I don't see how it will be possible to listen to any of my songs stored in the 'Cloud' without a Wi-fi connection.

Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

iTunes match is huge. There are more iTunes users than iPhone users, as far as I know. Once people with a large iTunes collection, or a collection transferable to iTunes, see their friends play anything in their collection, at any time, as a stream then their next purchase is likely an iPhone.

I don't know what this means. According to Apple: " Heres how it works: iTunes determines which songs in your collection are available in the iTunes Store. Any music with a match is automatically added to your iCloud library for you to listen to anytime, on any device. Since there are more than 18 million songs in the iTunes Store, most of your music is probably already in iCloud. All you have to upload is what iTunes cant match. "

What do my friends' collections have to do with this?
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post


Apple Store UK, iPod Classic £198; iPhone 4 £428 - £612

Fair enough. Was thinking sticker price, but as I often point out myself that is misleading.


Quote:
2) I'm not getting this at all. If my 15,000 songs won't fit on an iPod Touch now, how will they do so by downloading them using iTunes Match ? If it can't do that I don't see how it will be possible to listen to any of my songs stored in the 'Cloud' without a Wi-fi connection.

You can delete songs. Then add more. Streaming may also work. Like iCloud the idea is that your music is in the cloud, and partially synced to the device.



Quote:
I don't know what this means. According to Apple: " Here’s how it works: iTunes determines which songs in your collection are available in the iTunes Store. Any music with a match is automatically added to your iCloud library for you to listen to anytime, on any device. Since there are more than 18 million songs in the iTunes Store, most of your music is probably already in iCloud. All you have to upload is what iTunes can’t match. "

What do my friends' collections have to do with this?

. When you see your friend with an iPhone being able to play whatever he wants on his iPhone with his collection, you will want to do the same with your collection.

Many people have an iPod and an Android phone, for instance. This is a reason to switch.
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post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post



You can delete songs. Then add more. Streaming may also work. Like iCloud the idea is that your music is in the cloud, and partially synced to the device.

Yes, I understand that, but if I don't have wifi and the album I want to hear is not one that has been synced, them I'm stuffed. And where does partial syncing leave the brilliant Genius Playlists?





Quote:
Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

When you see your friend with an iPhone being able to play whatever he wants on his iPhone with his collection, you will want to do the same with your collection.

Many people have an iPod and an Android phone, for instance. This is a reason to switch.

I, and my friends with equally large music collections, all have iPod Classics and can play whatever we want already. We also don't have either iPhones or Android phones, but basic phones that we hardly ever use
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

Yes, I understand that, but if I don't have wifi and the album I want to hear is not one that has been synced, them I'm stuffed. And where does partial syncing leave the brilliant Genius Playlists?

Thats a genuine problem. For you. For me, my phone is not really used as a music device because I use it for apps and I dont use genius. I will download an album and play that.

It would be much better, of course, if you could share iTunes match with a friend. Like - recommend a song and let them play it, or stream it for a short time. Or send a playlist ( a la spotify). That might come, at a higher fee, sometime.
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post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephenbw View Post

Yes, I understand that, but if I don't have wifi and the album I want to hear is not one that has been synced, them I'm stuffed.

Go find McDonald's, Starbucks, Home Depot, Barnes & Noble, library, mall, friend's house, etc. with free wifi.
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

Go find McDonald's, Starbucks, Home Depot, Barnes & Noble, library, mall, friend's house, etc. with free wifi.

I am pleased to say that with the exception of libraries, none of those are available on the Greek Islands, Scottish Islands, rural Wales, or any of the other remote places I spend my holidays, which is why the iPod Classic is such a boon.

One Greek Island I regularly visit did once open a McDonald's, but thankfully good taste prevailed, nobody used it, and it soon closed down
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