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Apple University revealed as plan to teach executives to think like Steve Jobs - Page 2

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by philipm View Post

Many people have tried to codify what it takes to be a successful CEO but a lot of it is judgment calls, and you can't teach that. Jobs didn't invent much of what Apple is about; his role was a bit like someone watching a sculptor chipping away the rock that doesn't look like the desired statue, and yelling stop when it looks right. Or start again, if it goes way wrong. I don't agree with a fair number of things Apple has done but they are closer to right than much of the competition. Putting design at centre is one important aspect of culture that I hope will live on, but a company can keep going on momentum long after what made it successful at the start has gone. Look at HP, for example.

So wrong.

It would be interesting for you give us your insight of what you don't agree with. NOT.

Best you read the new book coming out.
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by aep528 View Post

Is LSD included with the tuition or do they have to buy it at the campus bookstore? Do they have field trips to Asia to visit Zen Buddhists? Like it or not, these are things that Steve jobs credited with helping him "think different."

On a somewhat more serious note, are they really teaching people to think like Steve Jobs, or to imitate Steve Jobs? Teaching people to think like Steve Jobs must include critical thinking of Steve Jobs, and finding the flaws and shortcomings in his approach to make the next one better. Is that really going to happen?

Don't knock LSD till you've tried it: there's actually plenty of research indicating that it can change people's lives in positive ways; but I expect employees are on their own in that regard. As for Zen Buddhists, there are plenty in the area, so no need to go to Asia.

But, I don't think people should be skeptical about this. The military have, very effectively, been teaching people to think a certain way for years. The most important part of getting a PhD in, say, physics, is not the specific knowledge your acquire or research you do, but learning how to think like a physicist. Done the right way, this could be a very successful program.
post #43 of 50
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post #44 of 50
Here's a link to a decent article in the business section of today's Los Angeles Times:

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-f...,2205323.story
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
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post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I'm skeptical too. Steve learned his ways from the school of hard knocks, and so did a lot of garage tinkerers. The trash coming out of MBA programs is laughable to say the least.

I enjoyed watching Steve Job's 2005 Stanford speech about not attending college due to not knowing what he wanted to do and did not want to bankrupt his parents. He took a calligraphy class that honestly, the "Biff, Tad, & Muffy" MBA-types would have ridiculed him for and most likely label Job's a lazy-hippie.

He did everything that no self-respecting school of higher education would ever recommend he do.

You can't learn what Steve learned from going to school. School teaches you to get a job, maybe learn how to run a company, but not to actually take the risks, the falls, and the reap the rewards of creating a company such as Steve Jobs did.

However, Steve Jobs did know to surround himself with an army of gifted people that knew how to do those things that frankly, Steve did not want to deal with. His ability to attract those people and those people in return believing in his vision and wanting to improve themselves thanks to Steve were key to all of Apple's successes.

I really, really hope that AU has some secret sauce to tap that potential in people. I really, really hope it does. I want to believe that.

Yeah, same reasons Reagan was such a successful president. Vision, attracted good people to his vision. Didn't relent on his vision. A bit of a showman. And thought different. We need someone in the White House who is like Steve!
post #46 of 50
Steve was reputed to be an INTJ aka "Mastermind". According to the Compleat Idiots Guide to the INTJ:

"Q: Can I become an INTJ?

A: Unless you are born an INTJ, your only hope is to find a genie lamp while strolling on the beach, rub it, and make a wish. You can fake being one of us by burying yourself in a mound of books, nerding out on a favorite subject (like quantum mechanics, not needlepoint), wandering around by yourself, not giving a damn what others think of you, etc. If this sounds like too much work, just try doing a good robot impersonation."


http://intjcentral.com/manual1

Steve's ways of doing things were easy to understand ... to another INTJ
post #47 of 50
This is complete and utter BS. I'm sorry but if there was a way to teach someone to be Steve Jobs...it would have been long ago....

This is starting to sound like one of those Ponzi schemes or "get rich" infomercials.
post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

I'm skeptical too. Steve learned his ways from the school of hard knocks, and so did a lot of garage tinkerers. The trash coming out of MBA programs is laughable to say the least.

I enjoyed watching Steve Job's 2005 Stanford speech about not attending college due to not knowing what he wanted to do and did not want to bankrupt his parents. He took a calligraphy class that honestly, the "Biff, Tad, & Muffy" MBA-types would have ridiculed him for and most likely label Job's a lazy-hippie.

He did everything that no self-respecting school of higher education would ever recommend he do.

You can't learn what Steve learned from going to school. School teaches you to get a job, maybe learn how to run a company, but not to actually take the risks, the falls, and the reap the rewards of creating a company such as Steve Jobs did.

However, Steve Jobs did know to surround himself with an army of gifted people that knew how to do those things that frankly, Steve did not want to deal with. His ability to attract those people and those people in return believing in his vision and wanting to improve themselves thanks to Steve were key to all of Apple's successes.

I really, really hope that AU has some secret sauce to tap that potential in people. I really, really hope it does. I want to believe that.

Ironically, it's like what my business teacher told our entire class: YOU'RE NOT ENTREPRENEAURS! OTHERWISE, YOU WOULDN'T BE HERE!

Kind of a slap in the the face of reality for me. School would have put Mr. Jobs on a totally different path. His drive is what got him here. He could have suddenly done a different path like you said.

Schools don't teach you to take risks, but "be safe". But the current economic crisis says that you're not safe ANYWHERE.
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by dpackman View Post

He is Harry Seldon.

Thanks for this, it was actually my first thought.
They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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They spoke of the sayings and doings of their commander, the grand duke, and told stories of his kindness and irascibility.
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post #50 of 50
Pixar is led by Ed Catmull who has 2 phds. Steve backed Pixar for a decade before Toy Story came out. Ed has great ideas, is a great leader and visionary too. The degrees he has are only part of that story, but they do show commitment. Many people with degrees aren't innovators-but having a degree does not cause anyone to be uncreative.
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