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Error 3200: Massive iOS 5 demand hinders Apple’s servers - Page 3

post #81 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by wcbaritone10 View Post

My iP4 has been "bricked" now for about 5 hours, my MacBook will not recognize it so I can't really do anything to it, it is just shuffling from the pinwheel to the apple logo on the screen. Any ideas?

Simply go see a Genius at your local Apple Store. Bring both your phone and your computer. Convenient Appointments are available.
post #82 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Simply go see a Genius at your local Apple Store. Bring both your phone and your computer. Convenient Appointments are available.

Real simple- right?
post #83 of 124
Not good. I can access calendar and contacts, but not mail. I could for a while, but no longer.

This is seriously uncool.

Tom
post #84 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpf1952 View Post

Not good. I can access calendar and contacts, but not mail. I could for a while, but no longer.

This is seriously uncool.

Tom

I'm seeing that problem this morning too. Mail for my me.com address will not load on iCloud or on my iPhone. Strangely I can still get it via MobileMe IMAP on my mac through the old mail.me.com server.
post #85 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

I'm seeing that problem this morning too. Mail for my me.com address will not load on iCloud or on my iPhone. Strangely I can still get it via MobileMe IMAP on my mac through the old mail.me.com server.

There's more: when I attempt to access mail via Apple Mail, my password is rejected. At the moment, contact via mail to and from the world is hit or miss. I'm a home-based business. I should know better than be "Mr. Early Adopter."


Tom
post #86 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpf1952 View Post

There's more: when I attempt to access mail via Apple Mail, my password is rejected. At the moment, contact via mail to and from the world is hit or miss. I'm a home-based business. I should know better than be "Mr. Early Adopter."


Tom

Which server is your Mail program pointing at? I'm running Snow Leopard, so mine is still on mail.me.com. That works fine at present.
post #87 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Which server is your Mail program pointing at? I'm running Snow Leopard, so mine is still on mail.me.com. That works fine at present.

I'm running Lion, 10.7.2. Just discovering my password has been rejected on my iPhone as well.

Incoming mail server: p99-imap.mail.me.com
Outgoing server: iCloud

Tom
post #88 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpf1952 View Post

I'm running Lion, 10.7.2. Just discovering my password has been rejected on my iPhone as well.

Incoming mail server: p99-imap.mail.me.com
Outgoing server: iCloud

Tom

Well you could try IMAP on mail.me.com (i.e. lose the p99-imap) - as I said - that still works for me even though I transitioned to iCloud.

EDIT: Now the iCloud mail interface isn't even giving server error messages - just giving the spinning pin wheel.
post #89 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Well you could try IMAP on mail.me.com (i.e. lose the p99-imap) - as I said - that still works for me even though I transitioned to iCloud.

EDIT: Now the iCloud mail interface isn't even giving server error messages - just giving the spinning pin wheel.

I'll give the IMAP on mail.me.com a try. Beat having to acclimate clients to another e-mail address, e.g gmail.

Thanks for your help.

Tom
post #90 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Simply go see a Genius at your local Apple Store. Bring both your phone and your computer. Convenient Appointments are available.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iKol View Post

Real simple- right?

Real simple? Don't know about that. Can the Apple geniuses get through the server logjam? Nope.

If everyone took this loopy advice, imagine the hordes at the Apple stores.
post #91 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpf1952 View Post

I'll give the IMAP on mail.me.com a try. Beat having to acclimate clients to another e-mail address, e.g gmail.

Thanks for your help.

Tom

Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

Well you could try IMAP on mail.me.com (i.e. lose the p99-imap) - as I said - that still works for me even though I transitioned to iCloud.

EDIT: Now the iCloud mail interface isn't even giving server error messages - just giving the spinning pin wheel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tpf1952 View Post

Not good. I can access calendar and contacts, but not mail. I could for a while, but no longer.

This is seriously uncool.

Tom


iCloud is creaking. Hopefully, it is the stress from initial signup. Still, Apple clearly underestimated the demand. Here's hoping Amazon and Microsoft are able to support Apple in this. But do they have reasons to be less than 100% supportive?
post #92 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

iCloud is creaking. Hopefully, it is the stress from initial signup. Still, Apple clearly underestimated the demand. Here's hoping Amazon and Microsoft are able to support Apple in this. But do they have reasons to be less than 100% supportive?

I guess I'm a bit surprised that it is creaking already - but that does seem to be what is happening. The services are working intermittently and slowly. But I rather doubt that even a large minority have switched yet, so that does not bode so well, unless all the OS and iOS upgrades in process are stressing the same servers as the regular services.
post #93 of 124
Although not bricked, I lost almost all the apps on my 3GS after the upgrade - should have waited another day until my 4S arrives. I am waiting to upgrade the iPad and wife's 4 until it settles down a little bit.

Also noticed that notifications don't work very well on the 3GS. Calendar entries keep disappearing and coming back randomly.
post #94 of 124
Still can't move to iCloud, which doesn't bother me that much in the short term

The upgrade to iOS 5 was not as straight forward. Understandable as every man, women and child were trying to download at the same time. Two big, slow upgrades for Lion, then a manual restore on the iPad, because of the errors, fixed this.

Still, got there in the end. I like where Apple are going with this.

Upgraded ATV this morning and tried Real Racing HD2 mirrored over AirPlay. Laggy and useless!

Mirroring outside of the game was pretty slick so i foresee an update on the game or an upgrade on my internet connection. I would have thought 10mb would be enough. We'll see.

Love iMessage. Love reminders and notifications and tabbed browsing in Safari is kewl.

First impressions are very good.
A reputation is not built upon the restful domain of one's comfort zone; it is made out of stalwart exposition of your core beliefs, for all challenges to disprove them as irrelevant hubris.- Berp...
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A reputation is not built upon the restful domain of one's comfort zone; it is made out of stalwart exposition of your core beliefs, for all challenges to disprove them as irrelevant hubris.- Berp...
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post #95 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

I guess I'm a bit surprised that it is creaking already - but that does seem to be what is happening. The services are working intermittently and slowly. But I rather doubt that even a large minority have switched yet, so that does not bode so well, unless all the OS and iOS upgrades in process are stressing the same servers as the regular services.

It makes you wonder if there is perhaps no truly effective way of simulating this scale of demand on their servers.

On the other hand, I am 100% there is. I believe they simply were not adequately prepared. If this is not a temporary hiccup, I wonder if they can offload most of the load to Amazon, Microsoft, IBM or any other cloud service provider until they get their data center truly in order.

Perhaps we are now seeing the reason for the *delay* of iPhone 4S release. Just imagine the next two weeks, when millions of iPhone 4S will join the iCloud fray. The rumblings you hear are Apple engineers running back and forth in North Carolina.
post #96 of 124
I always wait at least a day. Five minute download, phone restored in 30 minutes (not much on in).

This concludes prepping the 3GS for sale, if I can actually let it go. Sturdiest phone I've ever used.
post #97 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by oberpongo View Post

I thought with iTunes Apple is Used to serving a lot of data! What was that new data center for 1 billion $ for???

Do you have any idea how much data and how many requests we're talking about? Think in the millions. Show me any server in the world that can handle that.
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post #98 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by anilo View Post

Although not bricked, I lost almost all the apps on my 3GS after the upgrade - should have waited another day until my 4S arrives. I am waiting to upgrade the iPad and wife's 4 until it settles down a little bit.

Also noticed that notifications don't work very well on the 3GS. Calendar entries keep disappearing and coming back randomly.

Are you sure that you lost them? When my phone came back up after the upgrade - fully functional and no indication that a sync was still in progress - most of the apps were missing, but over the next 45 minutes, iTunes restored them all in the background. Same with all the other content. If I had unplugged the phone I suspect I would probably have assumed that I had the same problem.
post #99 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

It makes you wonder if there is perhaps no truly effective way of simulating this scale of demand on their servers.

On the other hand, I am 100% there is. I believe they simply were not adequately prepared. If this is not a temporary hiccup, I wonder if they can offload most of the load to Amazon, Microsoft, IBM or any other cloud service provider until they get their data center truly in order.

Perhaps we are now seeing the reason for the *delay* of iPhone 4S release. Just imagine the next two weeks, when millions of iPhone 4S will join the iCloud fray. The rumblings you hear are Apple engineers running back and forth in North Carolina.

I would think that it would be easy to simulate demand directly on the server, but hard to simulate on the connectivity to the backbone networks. If the latter were the problem then it may have been hard to predict.
post #100 of 124
That is what they get for making it so easy to update the OS. Android never has this problem because many of the phones can not even be updated. Maybe Apple should not have announced the availability and just let people discover it on their own.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #101 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Android never has this problem because many of the phones can not even be updated.

That's highly inaccurate. Is there really a need to lie about Android to make iOS look good? I seriously do not believe that's necessary.

What we see with iOS is the benefit of an integrated solution and the lack of carrier control. Apple develops, controls and releases their OS updates. It's all coordinated.

As for Android phones that cannot be upgraded, that's because the users don't know how as a result of too many cooks in the Android kitchen. But it's not true that many phones cannot be upgraded. Please don't lie.
post #102 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by muppetry View Post

I would think that it would be easy to simulate demand directly on the server, but hard to simulate on the connectivity to the backbone networks. If the latter were the problem then it may have been hard to predict.

I think it's quite easy to simulate the demand. Just ask hackers who stage DoS attacks on websites Not identical situations, but you get the gist.

This is why I had a change of mind in the middle of my post.
post #103 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Simply go see a Genius at your local Apple Store. Bring both your phone and your computer. Convenient Appointments are available.

LOL not. Try to get an appointment in NYC for anytime soon.

And judging by what I'm seeing having passed by two Apple Stores this morning, that's a strategy for someone who doesn't need to use their phone for a few weeks.

Maybe if Apple quickly quintuples the workforce in response to this, but otherwise not.
post #104 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

I think it's quite easy to simulate the demand. Just ask hackers who stage DoS attacks on websites Not identical situations, but you get the gist.

This is why I had a change of mind in the middle of my post.

Not sure I see what you mean. Hackers don't simulate it do they? They just hit the servers as hard as they can.
post #105 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Simply go see a Genius at your local Apple Store. Bring both your phone and your computer. Convenient Appointments are available.

Yeah I would call that CONVENIENT, as I am sure there will be NO line at all and you appointment will be right on time.

Half or more of the Apple stores are filed with people needing help. Brilliant idea to stage it that way, makes the stores look like they are crowded with shoppers.
post #106 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

As for Android phones that cannot be upgraded, that's because the users don't know how as a result of too many cooks in the Android kitchen. But it's not true that many phones cannot be upgraded. Please don't lie.

Sorry, apparently I am misinformed. I thought I read that the carriers were responsible for releasing updates for the Android phones that they sell and in many cases they never released any upgrades, which is why so many Android users simply buy a new phone in order to get the newest OS.

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post #107 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by SDW2001 View Post

Do you have any idea how much data and how many requests we're talking about? Think in the millions. Show me any server in the world that can handle that.

Here are some comparisons:

Facebook users upload 300M photos per day. Assume an average file size of 100kB. Of course, they do other things as well.

Netflix has 7M customers who on average stream 5 TV shows and 4 movies per week. In other words, they stream the equivalent of an iOS upgrade (including iTunes upgrade) each day.

Depending on how many *millions* of Apple customers were upgrading yesterday, it is possible the traffic load was close to the same scale as what FB, Netflix and others face daily.

But let's say it's much more. There are companies that can handle it.

For example - AWS: They store 500B+ "objects" and handle close to 400k requests per second. What does this mean? Object size varies, of course. But clearly they handle bigger traffic loads daily than what Apple had to handle yesterday. So yes, someone in the world could have dealt with this.

Having said that, Apple is an Amazon customer. So it's a question of how much they depended on AWS, Microsoft and their own data center.
post #108 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Sorry, apparently I am misinformed. I thought I read that the carriers were responsible for releasing updates for the Android phones that they sell and in many cases they never released any upgrades, which is why so many Android users simply buy a new phone in order to get the newest OS.

I was a bit harsh. Sorry.

Yes, carriers do control the OS releases in many cases, which is implied in my post. But you can get around that.

But how do you know that "so many" Android users buy a phone to upgrade their OS? That is not true. Most users don't really care about the OS, frankly.
post #109 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

I was a bit harsh. Sorry.

Yes, carriers do control the OS releases, which is implied in my post. But you can get around that.

But how do you know that "so many" Android users buy a phone to upgrade their OS? That is not true. Most users don't really care about the OS, frankly.


Many, is a relative term. All the Android users I know have purchased new phones before their contracts expired. When I asked them they usually say something like my old one broke or it was too slow or it stopped working. Several, another relative term, switched to iPhone. 'Many' times I speculate, or extrapolate based on a limited survey sample of my own experience.

You do seem a bit sensitive to the subject though.

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post #110 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

But how do you know that "so many" Android users buy a phone to upgrade their OS? That is not true. Most users don't really care about the OS, frankly.

Getting a new OS that improves the experience, extends it's longevity which also adds to its resale value. These of these affect the total cost of ownership. It sounds like you are saying consumers of Android-based devices don't consider this very important aspects of being a savvy consumer.

I wonder if most Android-based devices are eligible for updates since it seems there a lot more no-name vendors using Android than there are of the named vendors updating their flagship devices on a somewhat regular basis, which is what people usually reference.
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post #111 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by anilo View Post

Although not bricked, I lost almost all the apps on my 3GS after the upgrade - should have waited another day until my 4S arrives.

But you got them all back when you restored from backup, right?
post #112 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by bettieblue View Post

Yeah I would call that CONVENIENT, as I am sure there will be NO line at all and you appointment will be right on time.

Half or more of the Apple stores are filed with people needing help. Brilliant idea to stage it that way, makes the stores look like they are crowded with shoppers.

Welcome back. I guess you have recovered from your "no one will want an iPhone 4S" prediction embarrassment. These upgrade problems are, indeed, a most cunning strategy to make Apple stores look popular.
post #113 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by wcbaritone10 View Post

My iP4 has been "bricked" now for about 5 hours, my MacBook will not recognize it so I can't really do anything to it, it is just shuffling from the pinwheel to the apple logo on the screen. Any ideas?

If you live conveniently near an Apple Store, I would make a Genius Bar appointment and have someone look into it.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #114 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

If everyone took this loopy advice, imagine the hordes at the Apple stores.

You've obviously never been to the Genius Bar at an Apple Store. You have to make a reservation in a time slot to see a Genius. This guarantees you a time slot in which you have the Genius' full attenton, and it also manages traffic and minimizes wait times for patrons. There wouldn't be "hordes" unless everyone ignored their appointment times and showed up at once. Fandroid flights of fancy...

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

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post #115 of 124
Well apparently the term "bricked" has been hijacked and the meaning watered down. It used to mean that a device was completely useless and could not be repaired, it might as well be a brick.

But overly dramatic kids on the internet kept using it to refer to corrupted installations that require a reinstall. So now bricked simply means a corrupted installation. Unfortunately this leaves us with no word for "bricked" as in "bricked".

Let's have a moment of silence for the death of a useful term. Our language is now less precise. Now we have to add an adverb to the front of bricked for it to be useful in communication.

</language nazi>
post #116 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Well apparently the term "bricked" has been hijacked and the meaning watered down. It used to mean that a device was completely useless and could not be repaired, it might as well be a brick.

But overly dramatic kids on the internet kept using it to refer to corrupted installations that require a reinstall. So now bricked simply means a corrupted installation. Unfortunately this leaves us with no word for "bricked" as in "bricked".

Let's have a moment of silence for the death of a useful term. Our language is now less precise. Now we have to add an adverb to the front of bricked for it to be useful in communication.

</language nazi>

Bricked like a bricky brickyard!
post #117 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

That's highly inaccurate. Is there really a need to lie about Android to make iOS look good?

Not a lie at all. There are many Android phones that can't be upgraded, just look at the phones that are available for sale and see what versions they are on. I was just looking at some options, and other than the newest and most expensive, the ones I saw were shipping new right now with 2.2. One had 2.3 support announced almost a year ago but it still hasn't become available.

Sure it might be possible in some cases for a user with technical savvy to hack an unsupported phone to the newest version, but for the general public that's not a real option.

So chill out with the "don't lie" nonsense, the facts just don't back you up.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dfiler View Post

Well apparently the term "bricked" has been hijacked and the meaning watered down. It used to mean that a device was completely useless and could not be repaired, it might as well be a brick.

Totally agree, this was really annoying me. Anyone who says "It bricked my phone!!!!...and then I had to restore it from the backup" doesn't have a clue what the term means.
post #118 of 124
Thursday afternoon, servers over capacity. Apple's iCloud launch is going just as well as its MobileMe launch. Ok, minus the mass-data-loss but there's still time. This company is so out of its depth it's embarrassing.
post #119 of 124
After wasting my time getting hte 3200 error, i waited for americans to slepe.

Downloaded ok, updated ipad ok. Iphone has been a pig, absolute pig. never ending restoration errots, and other niggly things. its still not right, as everyime i resync, it tells me it has failed to restore, would I like to repeat again.

Just works.

Excellent.
Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
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Household: MacBook, iPad 16gb wifi, iPad 64gb wifi, iPad Mini 32gb, coming iPhone 5S, iPhone 4S 32gb, iPhone 32gb, iPod Touch 4th gen x1, iPod nano 16gb gen 5 x2, iPod nano gen 3 8gb, iPod classic...
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post #120 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

And you know for a fact that it wasn't Microsoft and Amazon servers that were buckling under demand?

Common sense should tell you it wasn't Microsoft/Amazon servers. In any case the answer is yes, I do.
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