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Should I Zero All Data?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I'm getting ready to do a clean install of my system like I do every year, but this year I thought to ask If it would be better to zero all data before. I know it takes a long time, but I'd do it if it would make my system better.
post #2 of 22
That is only necessary if you want to completely wipe the hard drive to prevent any recovery of the files, such as sensitive data.
post #3 of 22
You do a clean install once a year? Why? I like zeroing out my disks. It gives me a nice clean fresh feeling.
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
I do a lot of fiddling on my computers. I install programs and uninstall them. By the end of the year, I have all kinds of gunk I don't need, so I do a whole redo in the spring. Also, my new computer, iBook, didn't come partitioned, so I need to do that for X.
post #5 of 22
I understand thed fiddling... My new TI PB wasn't partitioned and I am still using it.. Did I f*ck up??
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
I don't think there's anything wrong with not partitioning. I only did it because 1) All the people at MWNY 01 said to 2) I have found that, on my iMac, it makes things much more manageable and organized.
post #7 of 22
How big is your disk? When I once zeroed my 60 gigger, it seemed to take for-eeevvveeerrrr. I think I had to leave it running for a whole day and a half uninterrupted (back when I was using OS9).
post #8 of 22
Doh! I did a clean OS X install, was I supposed to partition? Is there a benefit of doing so? Where do you do that? I dont remember there being an option for that during the install.

Also, where is the disc defrag utility in OS X? The disc utility program in OS X won't let you do or test anything on the main drive, only a second drive without the system folder. What good is that? Isn't the main concern - the top drive with all the system files on it? Is there no defrag or check-disk built into OS X?
post #9 of 22
[quote]Originally posted by Patchouli:
<strong>Doh! I did a clean OS X install, was I supposed to partition? Is there a benefit of doing so? Where do you do that?</strong><hr></blockquote>No, no, no. Partitioning is certainly not necessary and I don't recommended it for beginners. Partitioning is usually just for people who want to keep their documents or apps on a separate volume or for people who tinker with their OS and want to have a second or third copy of the OS in case they screw up. The problem with partitioning, though, is that if you ever decide to change the number of partitions or resize them, you have to format the entire drive effectively erasing all your data.
post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by starfleetX:
<strong>No, no, no. Partitioning is certainly not necessary and I don't recommended it for beginners. Partitioning is usually just for people who want to keep their documents or apps on a separate volume or for people who tinker with their OS and want to have a second or third copy of the OS in case they screw up. The problem with partitioning, though, is that if you ever decide to change the number of partitions or resize them, you have to format the entire drive effectively erasing all your data.</strong><hr></blockquote>

You got that right. I tried to walk my dad through partitioning once, and I don't know what he did, but he ended up needing a new drive!

I have a 10gb disk on my iBook. I went ahead and zeroed it. I'm not sure how long it took, because i started it before I went to bed and it was done when I got up.
post #11 of 22
I think when you buy a new disk it's a good idea to zero it but other than that I wouldn't bother.
post #12 of 22
every year I zero all data... On old iMacs (4gb drive) it would take about 30-45minutes. I dont think processor speed makes a differnce... the bigger the drive the bigger the wait. I dare not think of how long a 60GB drive would take.. but I hope you have nothing to do for a weekend ;-)

Seriously though, when I zero a drive and do a nice fresh install and then install all the apps I need n want, and then go through with a Disk Setup to optimize the drive, getting all yer little bits of data nicely packed together... your mac will feel like it got a nice boost.
I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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I'm having deja-vu and amnesia at the same time. I think I've forgotten this before.
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post #13 of 22
Zeroing a drive doesn't give [virtually] any benefits, except that there is absolutely no trace of the previous data. It's almost never necessary. Partitioning isn't too difficult, but I've never tried walking a novice through it, so I suppose I'm not the best judge of that.

[quote] The disc utility program in OS X won't let you do or test anything on the main drive, only a second drive without the system folder. What good is that? Isn't the main concern - the top drive with all the system files on it? Is there no defrag or check-disk built into OS X? <hr></blockquote>

On the computer's startup (and/or restart), the main hard drive is checked, and fixed by the disk utiltity program. If it is the culprit of any problems, you can restart back into os x which will cause the precautionary disk check, or restart onto another drive (if it has an OS on it, including cds), then check the x-disk as if it were the secondary drive.
post #14 of 22
> The problem with partitioning, though, is that if you ever decide to change the number of partitions or resize them, you have to format the entire drive effectively erasing all your data. <

The problem is that if you don't back up in the first place, you have a problem. So, you just back up, and then partition, followed by a re-install of your stuff. No problem.

Also, if my X-partion crashes badly, which is not unlikely considering how flaky X is, I can just re-install X, knowing that all my apps are safe on another partition, as well as my 9 and my Classic.

"Partitioning Rules" IMHumbleO

- T.I.

[edit: Why is UBB not enabled here?]

[ 03-27-2002: Message edited by: The Installer ]</p>
MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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post #15 of 22
Quote:
Also, if my X-partion crashes badly, which is not unlikely considering how flaky X is, I can just re-install X, knowing that all my apps are safe on another partition, as well as my 9 and my Classic.

Okay, I've heard anti-OSX arguments, but none claimed to infect and destroy the whole partition. If an OS is slow, or crashes (note: mine doesn't crash, and is only slow cuz my comp is old; but these are arguments i've heard) it doesn't mean that the hd is in danger. If my OS totally crapped out, I can just as easily re-install x on the same hard drive (or partition) as always. Nothing to stop me. Re-installing the operating system on the same partition as apps won't affect any programs any more than on a separate partition. Sys files should be kept in a diff part of the hierarchy anyway, so if you want to purge the OS, you could delete the "System" folder (for OS X, or "System Folder" for os 9).
post #16 of 22
How do you zero data??
Because the people who are crazy enough to think thay can change the world, are the ones who do
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Because the people who are crazy enough to think thay can change the world, are the ones who do
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post #17 of 22
[quote]Originally posted by Alpha Mac:
<strong>How do you zero data??</strong><hr></blockquote>First I need to know what you have on your HD . . .

Seriously though, you have to restart with your 9-disk, go into "Drive Setup" / "Functions" / "Initialization Options" and then you will see a window that gives you the option "Zero all data".

- T.I.
MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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post #18 of 22
[quote]Originally posted by The Installer:
<strong>First I need to know what you have on your HD . . . </strong><hr></blockquote>
If i told you i'd have to kil you!!!

P.S.Thanks

[ 03-29-2002: Message edited by: Alpha Mac ]</p>
Because the people who are crazy enough to think thay can change the world, are the ones who do
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Because the people who are crazy enough to think thay can change the world, are the ones who do
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post #19 of 22
I have heard that the "zero all data" option should only be used with SCSI disks and NOT IDE disks. I believe the reason was something along the lines of the drive not giving you the use of the full capacity after the zeroing.

Can anybody confirm or refute this?

-Ender
If you find yourself sided with the majority, it is time to change your thinking.

-Mark Twain
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If you find yourself sided with the majority, it is time to change your thinking.

-Mark Twain
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post #20 of 22
whoops

[ 03-29-2002: Message edited by: Ender ]</p>
If you find yourself sided with the majority, it is time to change your thinking.

-Mark Twain
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If you find yourself sided with the majority, it is time to change your thinking.

-Mark Twain
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post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by Ender:
<strong>I have heard that the "zero all data" option should only be used with SCSI disks and NOT IDE disks. I believe the reason was something along the lines of the drive not giving you the use of the full capacity after the zeroing.

Can anybody confirm or refute this?

-Ender</strong><hr></blockquote>

I'm not an expert, but on my system (IDE disk), it seems to have all the drive space. One partition is 7.41 gb and the other is 1.95 gb (I have a 10gb drive).
post #22 of 22
[quote]Originally posted by Ender:
<strong>I have heard that the "zero all data" option should only be used with SCSI disks and NOT IDE disks. I believe the reason was something along the lines of the drive not giving you the use of the full capacity after the zeroing.</strong><hr></blockquote>First time I have heard this, but then I am no expert. Anyone?

- T.I.
MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013) / 2.6 GHz Intel Core i5 / 8GB RAM / 500GB SSD
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