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Jobs trusted Cook to "know exactly what to do"

post #1 of 37
Thread Starter 
Excerpts from Steve Jobs' upcoming biography have been leaked online, giving new insight into the relationship between the Apple co-founder his eventual successor.

Jobs' authorized biography, written by Walter Isaacson, will officially be released on Oct. 24, however various publications have already obtained copies and are posting excerpts from it on their respective websites, the most recent being a Bloomberg report on Tim Cook's history with Apple and his relationship with Jobs.

Cook joined the company in 1998, after being lured away from Compaq Computer, Bloomberg reports, and quickly earned the trust of Jobs, who had recently taken back control of the company he helped create after being ousted 12 years earlier.

"My intuition told me that joining Apple would be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work for a creative genius, Cook said. Engineers are taught to make a decision analytically, but there are times when relying on gut or intuition is most indispensable.

When Jobs first returned in 1997, he oversaw Apple's supply chain, though he handed that facet of the business over to Cook in order to focus on a broader strategy for the company.

"I trusted him to know exactly what to do," Jobs told Walter Isaacson, author of the biography. He went on to say that the two shared the same vision, allowing them to work together at a "high strategic level."

Before Cook took over the supply chain, Jobs was attempting to change the way Apple handled manufacturing by building "just-in-time" factories, where products are built as orders come in, limiting overstock of inventory. His goal was to make the company leaner and more agile, and he entrusted Cook to get the job done.

When Cook took over the supply chain, he cut the number of component suppliers from 100 to 24, in a move to force the companies to compete for Apple's business. Cook then shut down 10 of the 19 company warehouses to limit overstocking, and by September 1998 inventory was down from a month to only six days.

According to Bloomberg, the book paints a picture of Cook as Jobs' ideal counterpart because he was calm, decisive and didn't want to be in the public eye. Part of Cook's success at Apple was his ability to know when to disagree with Jobs, reports Bloomberg.

"I realized very early on that if you didn't express your opinion, he would mow you down," Cook said. "He takes contrary positions to create more discussion, because it may lead to a better result."



As it became more clear that a successor was needed to head the world's most valuable tech company, Cook began to take on more responsibility as a leader, and oversaw Apple's day-to-day business during Jobs' three medical leaves.

In 2009, with Jobs on leave for a liver transplant, Cook said during a conference call that Apple would thrive no matter who was in charge.

Tim Cook talks with Steve Jobs | Source: SiliconAngle

When Jobs heard Cook's remarks, Isaacson wrote, he didn't know whether to be "proud or hurt that it might be true."

At the time of his resignation in August, the Apple co-founder wrote in a public letter to the board of directors that Cook should be his successor.

"I knew what I wanted and I met Tim, and he wanted the same thing," Jobs said.
post #2 of 37
Skip article. Wait for book.
post #3 of 37
It's been said before, but Apple is in good hands.

It's not surprising to me that Apple has been so successful lately. They're truly hitting on all cylinders, from beginning to end:

-Jony Ive arguably leads the most brilliant design team in consumer electronics
-Apple uses its cash to secure cheap, dependable supply chains
-Corporate secrecy feeds curiosity, surprise, etc. about Apple's releases
-As the article mentioned, their system of inventory is very lean
-Apple's keynotes are the gold standard. They're clear, well-rehearsed, and fun. Steve will be missed of course \
-Their success in retail is the stuff of legends. Record-setting profit margins per square foot.
-Customer satisfaction and support have been topping competitors for over 6 years. ~90%+satisfaction

On top of all that, they're pioneering new fields or invigorating old ones, never content. Repeat cycle.
post #4 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by acslater017 View Post

It's been said before, but Apple is in good hands.

It's not surprising to me that Apple has been so successful lately. They're truly hitting on all cylinders, from beginning to end:

-Jony Ive arguably leads the most brilliant design team in consumer electronics
-Apple uses its cash to secure cheap, dependable supply chains
-Corporate secrecy feeds curiosity, surprise, etc. about Apple's releases
-As the article mentioned, their system of inventory is very lean
-Apple's keynotes are the gold standard. They're clear, well-rehearsed, and fun. Steve will be missed of course \
-Their success in retail is the stuff of legends. Record-setting profit margins per square foot.
-Customer satisfaction and support have been topping competitors for over 6 years. ~90%+satisfaction

On top of all that, they're pioneering new fields or invigorating old ones, never content. Repeat cycle.

Yup - At this point Apple is well and truly in control of its destiny. Long may they stay sharp, hungry and on their toes.
post #5 of 37
I can't believe this has happened so soon.

It wasn't Steve Jobs' time to leave this earth yet.
post #6 of 37
I have a feeling I'm going to be on an emotional rollercoaster while reading this book.
post #7 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

I have a feeling I'm going to be on an emotional rollercoaster while reading this book.

Ditto

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post #8 of 37
I'll bet the farm on a guess that the last chapter of the book is titled: One More Thing...

If so, I'd jerk a tear.

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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post #9 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

I have a feeling I'm going to be on an emotional rollercoaster while reading this book.

Just make sure you keep a box of tissues nearby
post #10 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by acslater017 View Post

It's been said before, but Apple is in good hands.

It's not surprising to me that Apple has been so successful lately. They're truly hitting on all cylinders, from beginning to end:

-Jony Ive arguably leads the most brilliant design team in consumer electronics
-Apple uses its cash to secure cheap, dependable supply chains
-Corporate secrecy feeds curiosity, surprise, etc. about Apple's releases
-As the article mentioned, their system of inventory is very lean
-Apple's keynotes are the gold standard. They're clear, well-rehearsed, and fun. Steve will be missed of course \
-Their success in retail is the stuff of legends. Record-setting profit margins per square foot.
-Customer satisfaction and support have been topping competitors for over 6 years. ~90%+satisfaction

On top of all that, they're pioneering new fields or invigorating old ones, never content. Repeat cycle.

+1

Nice summary.

Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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Why does Apple bashing and trolling make people feel so good?

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post #11 of 37
How about that picture of Tim and Steve. You can see the serious nature of Steve Jobs in his face. Imagine Steve looking at you that serious. Wow. I saw the iPhone 4S keynote with Tim and he seemed very much in control and very professional. I say we have our selves a rock solid CEO on our hands. Also he is a health nut. No worries there. I see at least 15 years of Tim Cook. And we have a great set of VP's at Apple. See you at the mother ship Steve. If you don't get it. Really, why ask!
An Apple man since 1977
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post #12 of 37
It's still a bummer when I come to these sites each day and have to face the fact that Sj is actually dead. Honestly, I didn't think I'd think about it this much. But it's definitely made the technology world much less interesting to me, which is a bummer. I hope it gets intriguing again.
post #13 of 37
Cook was thus a good listener who's personality knew to go with 'Job's flow'.

However there may be that next turning point to negotiate once the to do list is overtaken by current events.
post #14 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by acslater017 View Post

It's been said before, but Apple is in good hands.

It's not surprising to me that Apple has been so successful lately. They're truly hitting on all cylinders, from beginning to end:

-Jony Ive arguably leads the most brilliant design team in consumer electronics
-Apple uses its cash to secure cheap, dependable supply chains
-Corporate secrecy feeds curiosity, surprise, etc. about Apple's releases
-As the article mentioned, their system of inventory is very lean
-Apple's keynotes are the gold standard. They're clear, well-rehearsed, and fun. Steve will be missed of course \
-Their success in retail is the stuff of legends. Record-setting profit margins per square foot.
-Customer satisfaction and support have been topping competitors for over 6 years. ~90%+satisfaction

On top of all that, they're pioneering new fields or invigorating old ones, never content. Repeat cycle.

I have one tinny question: How can Apple depend on Samsung for its most critical component, the A4, 5 CPU? Apple is embroiled in a worldwide legal and marketing fight. Samsung are nothing by thieves of IPRs... they copy everything down to the icons, case and patents. They probably take apart the design and features of the A chips and duplicate the principles.

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?
post #15 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

I have one tinny question: How can Apple depend on Samsung for its most critical component, the A4, 5 CPU? Apple is embroiled in a worldwide legal and marketing fight. Samsung are nothing by thieves of IPRs... they copy everything down to the icons, case and patents. They probably take apart the design and features of the A chips and duplicate the principles.

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?

What Apple has chosen not to tell you.

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post #16 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

I have one tinny question: How can Apple depend on Samsung for its most critical component, the A4, 5 CPU? Apple is embroiled in a worldwide legal and marketing fight. Samsung are nothing by thieves of IPRs... they copy everything down to the icons, case and patents. They probably take apart the design and features of the A chips and duplicate the principles.

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?

Well for one thing, even if Apple has decided to dump Samsung, you can't replace a company that makes 7 to 8 billion dollars of equipment for you overnight. Purchasing and manufacturing contracts must be completed, especially any prepaid contracts, then new contracts with new manufacturers, if found, must be negotiated etc. etc.

Apple products sell in the MULTI-millions, How many manufacturers, if any, could possibly ramp up to the volumes Apple would require without building new factories or at least greatly expanding their existing factories. A transition away from Samsung could easily take years to complete.

Think of the Apple's custom A5 chip as an example for a minute, How many is Apple going to need in the next 12 months? The A5 is in the iPhone4S and the iPad2 so 100 million, most likely more? Apple can't contact just any manufacturer and say I want you to start making me 2 million of my very own 'custom' chip every WEEK starting tomorrow. These things take time.
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post #17 of 37
Perhaps that there is a limited number of companies that can produce the processors at the demand that Apple needs them. Apple is working on reducing its dependence on Samsung, but it can't be done over night. Apple also has long term contracts in place that Apple probably can't breach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?
post #18 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company....

You know this for certain because....?

Do you remember the switch to Intel from Motorola for OS X? When it happened, it was revealed that Apple secretly had been building and testing the Intel version simultaneously with public Motorola version. They had their insurance in back pocket.

I'm assuming there are plenty of proto iPhones in the labs of Apple, all running different hardware and versions of iOS - 80 billion in the bank funds that kind of insurance...
post #19 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Apple also has long term contracts in place that Apple probably can't breach.

And as those contracts work both ways, neither can Samsung.

Regardless of any legal wrangling between Apple and other divisions of Samsung, Samsung Semiconductor have a legal obligation to keep supplying components to Apple until that contract is over.

Also despite all the legal action do you really think it would do Samsung any favours to lose 8 billion dollars a year in revenue? They must know that they have to compromise because they aren't going to make that difference up through Galaxy sales alone....
post #20 of 37
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post #21 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

I have one tinny question: How can Apple depend on Samsung for its most critical component, the A4, 5 CPU? Apple is embroiled in a worldwide legal and marketing fight. Samsung are nothing by thieves of IPRs... they copy everything down to the icons, case and patents. They probably take apart the design and features of the A chips and duplicate the principles.

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?

Most likely totally unrelated to Apple but I find news like this interesting:

India's Soctronics Claims 28nm Design Win

http://www.eetimes.com/electronics-n...-nm-design-win

I also think that Apple could be considering TSMC as a takeover target.
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post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrang View Post

You know this for certain because....?

Do you remember the switch to Intel from Motorola for OS X? When it happened, it was revealed that Apple secretly had been building and testing the Intel version simultaneously with public Motorola version. They had their insurance in back pocket.

I'm assuming there are plenty of proto iPhones in the labs of Apple, all running different hardware and versions of iOS - 80 billion in the bank funds that kind of insurance...

Given that they used a custom design they've probably had a lot of failed designs as well. That said do you realize just how expensive it is to develop and manufacture a one off of a single prototype? Regarding Intel Apple also mentioned they were also looking at AMD at the time, but they weren't sure if AMD could keep up with the volume requirements. I mentioned when this first started that there are very few manufacturers worldwide that are capable of filling such an order, and yet everyone was sure Samsung would be gone by the next day .

Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Perhaps that there is a limited number of companies that can produce the processors at the demand that Apple needs them. Apple is working on reducing its dependence on Samsung, but it can't be done over night. Apple also has long term contracts in place that Apple probably can't breach.

Even if the long term contracts didn't exist there's a certain process when it comes to vetting potential suppliers/manufacturing partners. Wasn't there something mentioned about Apple investing quite a lot in a new factory for Sharp or some other company? The point I'm trying to make is that unless they are investing in the infrastructure of another company, their choices for these things are severely limited, and as Apple blacklists suppliers like Samsung their pool of potential component suppliers becomes quite small.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

I have one tinny question: How can Apple depend on Samsung for its most critical component, the A4, 5 CPU? Apple is embroiled in a worldwide legal and marketing fight. Samsung are nothing by thieves of IPRs... they copy everything down to the icons, case and patents. They probably take apart the design and features of the A chips and duplicate the principles.

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?

You truly have no idea how hard it must be for them to switch manufacturers on such a component. Apple has had some real hardware failures in their product line in the past. The G5, several generations of imac screen problems, the 23" ACD, the Nvidia Quadro cards and their drivers, certain generations of macbook (pros) running at scorching temperatures, iphone antenna issue, etc.

The ipad is a huge deal for them. They don't want to add a comparable ipad incident to that list by using an untested manufacturer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Realistic View Post

Well for one thing, even if Apple has decided to dump Samsung, you can't replace a company that makes 7 to 8 billion dollars of equipment for you overnight. Purchasing and manufacturing contracts must be completed, especially any prepaid contracts, then new contracts with new manufacturers, if found, must be negotiated etc. etc.

Exactly aside from current liabilities there's a huge vetting process to it and they need to bring an assembly line up to par for this. Factories tend to make runs on whatever product or component. They try to maintain as little downtime as possible so these things are scheduled out. There aren't just empty factories with fully people waiting to make something for Apple . Also Apple may pay cash but that doesn't allow them to supersede existing contracts. It takes a while to build something with a new supplier or manufacturer up to what they had with Samsung.
post #23 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by acslater017 View Post

It's been said before, but Apple is in good hands.

It's not surprising to me that Apple has been so successful lately. They're truly hitting on all cylinders, from beginning to end:

-Jony Ive arguably leads the most brilliant design team in consumer electronics
-Apple uses its cash to secure cheap, dependable supply chains
-Corporate secrecy feeds curiosity, surprise, etc. about Apple's releases
-As the article mentioned, their system of inventory is very lean
-Apple's keynotes are the gold standard. They're clear, well-rehearsed, and fun. Steve will be missed of course \
-Their success in retail is the stuff of legends. Record-setting profit margins per square foot.
-Customer satisfaction and support have been topping competitors for over 6 years. ~90%+satisfaction

On top of all that, they're pioneering new fields or invigorating old ones, never content. Repeat cycle.

But Apple don't have Adobe flash in their products. Nobody wants a tablet or phone without it.
Just look at the last reports. Apple missed all goals. They only grew 54% and the shares went down 7%

We are DOOMED.


post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

I have one tinny question: How can Apple depend on Samsung for its most critical component, the A4, 5 CPU? Apple is embroiled in a worldwide legal and marketing fight. Samsung are nothing by thieves of IPRs... they copy everything down to the icons, case and patents. They probably take apart the design and features of the A chips and duplicate the principles.

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?

On Friday, August 12, 2011, the partnership between TSMC and Apple was announced and TSMC has begun trial production the A6 chip for Apple's next-generation iPads and iPhones.[8][9

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSMC

Enjoy, your fears should be gone now...
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post #25 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendon View Post

On Friday, August 12, 2011, the partnership between TSMC and Apple was announced and TSMC has begun trial production the A6 chip for Apple's next-generation iPads and iPhones.[8][9

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSMC

Enjoy, your fears should be gone now...

From more recent news it seems that Apple is sticking with Samsung for the A6... and I find that odd because there are reports saying that Samsung is behind in their 28nm production and TSMC has already started pumping out 28nm chips.

... but... now TSMC has successfully taped out a 20nm A15 chip scheduled to begin production next September.

Hmmmmmm...
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post #26 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

From more recent news it seems that Apple is sticking with Samsung for the A6... and I find that odd because there are reports saying that Samsung is behind in their 28nm production and TSMC has already started pumping out 28nm chips.

... but... now TSMC has successfully taped out a 20nm A15 chip scheduled to begin production next September.

Hmmmmmm...

Relationship looks fine to me...

http://www.phonearena.com/news/TSMC-...-chips_id22755

But what do I know...
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post #27 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendon View Post

Relationship looks fine to me...

http://www.phonearena.com/news/TSMC-...-chips_id22755

But what do I know...

The news about the A6 production seems to be all over the map these days. My bet is that Apple is seriously eyeing TSMC as its major supplier in the future.
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post #28 of 37
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post #29 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The question with TSMC is about yields. See post #20 above, and the recent AI article and others from this week noting long-term discussions about A6 and A7 between Cook and Samsung's Lee.

TSMC will likely participate, but it seems increasingly unlikely they'll be able to provide everything Apple needs to sustain its growth, hence Cook's interest in maintain the relationship with Samsung.

... and then there are other reports that say that Samsung is far behind on the 28nm front.

Hard to say...
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post #30 of 37
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post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacRulez View Post

The question with TSMC is about yields. See post #20 above, and the recent AI article and others from this week noting long-term discussions about A6 and A7 between Cook and Samsung's Lee.

TSMC will likely participate, but it seems increasingly unlikely they'll be able to provide everything Apple needs to sustain its growth, hence Cook's interest in maintain the relationship with Samsung.

It could be that Apple is hedging it's bets, it would prefer TSMC but TSMC may not be fully ready in time. Apple would logically continue the relationship with TSMC while also getting Samsung up to speed, it could be both supplying parts to Apple as Apple slowly weans itself from Samsung while allowing TSMC time to get their house in order. Once Apple has confidence that TSMC has their quality and yield issues in order then they will start to reduce their orders to Samsung. I don't think with orders this large it is healthy to look at the supplier situation as all Samsung or all TSMC there is room for both, plus this means there should be no supply issues with the A6 or A7 as Apple pushes into China.
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post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by acslater017 View Post

It's been said before, but Apple is in good hands.

It's not surprising to me that Apple has been so successful lately. They're truly hitting on all cylinders, from beginning to end:

-Jony Ive arguably leads the most brilliant design team in consumer electronics
-Apple uses its cash to secure cheap, dependable supply chains
-Corporate secrecy feeds curiosity, surprise, etc. about Apple's releases
-As the article mentioned, their system of inventory is very lean
-Apple's keynotes are the gold standard. They're clear, well-rehearsed, and fun. Steve will be missed of course \
-Their success in retail is the stuff of legends. Record-setting profit margins per square foot.
-Customer satisfaction and support have been topping competitors for over 6 years. ~90%+satisfaction

On top of all that, they're pioneering new fields or invigorating old ones, never content. Repeat cycle.

+1

Perfection in a post. Thanks.....
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_in_sb View Post

Ditto

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

I have a feeling I'm going to be on an emotional rollercoaster while reading this book.

I'm hoping for some closure. I need closure.
post #34 of 37
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post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

I have one tinny question: How can Apple depend on Samsung for its most critical component, the A4, 5 CPU? Apple is embroiled in a worldwide legal and marketing fight. Samsung are nothing by thieves of IPRs... they copy everything down to the icons, case and patents. They probably take apart the design and features of the A chips and duplicate the principles.

Apple has no real back up to the A chips. It is the most important component for the entire company. Cook is not dumb. What am I missing?

Why do you say "Apple has no real back up to the A chips"? I think you are vastly misreading the situation.

You forget that one of Tim Cook's first jobs was running Apple's supply chain. Apple doesn't have just one supplier for anything, not just one plan. I'm sure they have plans B, C, and D figured out for each of their parts suppliers. I have no doubt Apple's got the CEO of every volume chip fab in the world on speed dial. And these companies have Tim Cook on speed dial.

To me, the fact that Apple keeps using Samsung for chips says more about the strength of Samsung's semiconductor business. Apple chose Samsung to fab the A chips, probably because Samsung can do it at the volume Apple needs for a competitive price.

Also, this isn't a divorce. There's a legal and PR battle between the companies, but the drama between the companies is largely fabricated by the media. Consider for a moment that Samsung's slavish copying of Apple isn't going to stop even if Apple withdraws their business. It won't put Samsung Semiconductor out of business. It won't stop cloning of Apple designs or icons or even user-interface elements. I'm sure Apple's ARM-derived designs are heavily protected from copying, so there's no chance Samsung could get away with theft of Apple's chip IP. At the end of the day, why NOT keep Samsung as a chip supplier, if they are good at it?

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post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrang View Post

...Do you remember the switch to Intel from Motorola for OS X?...

To be clear, there was never a period in history when Apple switched directly from "Morotola to Intel". By the time Apple switched over to Intel-manufactured CPUs, Motorola was already years out of the desktop CPU business, with Freescale as the designated successor.

Even if you ignored that point, the fact still remains that Apple had stopped using single-sourced "Morotola/Freescale" parts back when they dumped the old 68K series of processors. PowerPC had always been a joint venture between Apple, IBM, and Motorola/Freescale, with IBM and Motorola/Freescale both participating in the manufacturing chain. For example, Apple sourced its G5 CPUs from IBM, not from Motorola/Freescale.

The transition from PowerPC to x86 actually marked Apple transitioning from two different desktop-class CPU suppliers to only one. (But never forget -- in the desktop domain, Apple almost certainly maintains a stable of engineering prototype Macs running on x86-based AMD processors, just in case anything ever went wrong with their relationship with Intel.)
post #37 of 37
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