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Steve Jobs left iTunes creator in charge of connected TV initiative

post #1 of 70
Thread Starter 
Jeff Robbin, an Apple vice president and engineer who helped create both iTunes and the iPod, is leading the company's efforts to produce a connected TV with integrated search functionality, according to a new report.

Citing multiple people familiar with the project, Bloomberg reported on Monday that Robbin is in charge of Cupertino, Calif., company's secretive high-definition TV project. According to the sources, Apple is working to integrate seamless content search features into the device.

"For example, instead of having to separately check to see if a movie or show is available through Netflix or a cable service, all the material could be integrated," the report noted.

Robbin worked as a system software engineer at Apple in the 1990s before leaving to work on his own software projects. While at software publisher Casady & Greene, he helped to develop the SoundJam MP MP3 player software. In late 2000, AppleInsider was first to report that Apple had purchased the rights for SoundJam from Casady & Greene, bringing Robbin back into the fold to head up the software's transformation into iTunes.

Back at Apple, Robbin also played a crucial role in the development of the iPod, which just recently celebrated its 10-year anniversary. He is listed among the inventors of several key iPod-related patent filings, though not all of the applications were successfully converted into legitimate patents.

His current role at Apple is vice president of consumer applications and lead software designer for iTunes.

Apple VP Jeff Robbin giving a demo of iTunes in 2009 | Credit: Engadget.

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs at one point considered Robbin to be of such high value to the company that he worked to keep Robbin's role under wraps. According to the bestselling biography on Jobs, officially released on Monday, Jobs refused to allow a Time magazine reporter to use the engineer's full name in an article because he feared Robbin would be poached by another company. The book also noted that Robbin was one of the Apple executives who successfully lobbied Jobs to allow a Windows version of iTunes.

Having persisted for years, rumors surrounding Apple's connected television initiative have gained momentum after Jobs' biography confirmed that he had been working on such a device. Author Walter Isaacson quoted Jobs in an interview as saying that he wanted to make television sets "simple and elegant," just like he had done with computers, music players and phones.

"It will have the simplest user interface you could imagine," Jobs reportedly said of the project. "I finally cracked it."

Multiple analysts claimed (1, 2) on Monday that Apple has been building prototype high-definition TVs, possibly in preparation for a 2012 launch. The rumored product would represent a strong opportunity for the company, as some have projected the LCD TV market to top $100 billion next year.

Apple currently sells a $99 Apple TV set-top box, but considers the device to be little more than a "hobby."
post #2 of 70
Geez, today must have been AppleTV day or something. Well, we'll see. Still think this will be an Apple box that attaches to 3rd-party 'Apple-blessed' TVs.
post #3 of 70
I'm just hoping Apple finds a way to finally gives us all the service we really want. All the shows on all the networks, episodes available at air time, on any device, for one reasonable monthly fee. Cable without the horrible cable box.
post #4 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

Still think this will be an Apple box that attaches to 3rd-party 'Apple-blessed' TVs.

You may be right, but that'd mean they'd have to include a camera in the bezel to Apple's specs in order to include Facetime--a must have function to make this TV truly stand out from the crowd.
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post #5 of 70
Once again, this device will compete with the Bose videotape product and not the best buy "wall of stretched to fit monitors", Built to price.
post #6 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by franktinsley View Post

I'm just hoping Apple finds a way to finally gives us all the service we really want. All the shows on all the networks, episodes available at air time, on any device, for one reasonable monthly fee. Cable without the horrible cable box.

The sad thing is I think the studios would sooner kill a helpless baby than to let that happen. They don''t want to effectively cede control of their market to Apple. Keep in mind that if you actually had to PICK what you wanted to watch, more than half the cable channels would disappear, including the one obscure channel you might be interested in. The current system only works because they play round robin with the money they collect to prop up channels that wouldn't be able to support themselves on their own.

We all know the future is IPTV. The question is how do we get there when the cable companies have their powerful lobbying groups to protect themselves? They don't want to be seen as dumb pipes in which you'll have the choice of picking 6-7 providers of TV content (of which Apple could be one). They want to delay that day for as long as financially possible!
post #7 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

Geez, today must have been AppleTV day or something. Well, we'll see. Still think this will be an Apple box that attaches to 3rd-party 'Apple-blessed' TVs.

That would make no sense in the context of Steve's revelation in the book. He wants it to be as simple as possible. He talks about controlling the entire user experience just like Mac, iPod, iPhone, and iPad. You can't control the ENTIRE user experience if you have to deal with other manufacturer's televisions. When he said that the cable companies' grasp on the industry couldn't be solved by selling people an add on box because they still had to pay for it when cable companies' were giving their boxes away for free, it was true. Saying that he cracked it, means that Apple would have to have the user in their hands the second they walk out of an Apple Store with one of their TVs. You get home, plug it in, sign in with your Apple ID and it already has your iCloud content already on the TV and new content ready to be purchased and watched without involving cable companies.

An Apple TV won't have a lot of the commonly used connectors at the back. Apple is notorious for retiring old I/O in favour of upcoming new tech. Coax, RCA and component are goners. I imagine it will have to have HDMI to gain industry acceptance but even that is not guaranteed.

A simple plug in TV with a power cable, Thunderbolt, with built in Apple TV software, SIRI for more complex actions than what Apple's simple remote can be practical for (text input), a FaceTime camera and WiFi for straightforward connectivity with iCloud and iOS devices.

I'm convinced Apple will hit this out of the ballpark with one minor exception: the price. Apple needs to price this to sell. Otherwise it won't. The days of premium priced Apple products for fanboys are over. Apple is pricing their products more aggressively than ever. They're still higher than the competition, but not enough to keep them out of the hands of most consumers. I don't think they can sell this for more than $1,500 and that's already very high for a 50" HDTV.
post #8 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPedro View Post

That would make no sense in the context of Steve's revelation in the book. He wants it to be as simple as possible. He talks about controlling the entire user experience just like Mac, iPod, iPhone, and iPad. You can't control the ENTIRE user experience if you have to deal with other manufacturer's televisions.

An Apple TV won't have a lot of the commonly used connectors at the back. Apple is notorious for retiring old I/O in favour of upcoming new tech. Coax, RCA and component are goners. I imagine it will have to have HDMI to gain industry acceptance but even that is not guaranteed.

A simple plug in TV with a power cable, Thunderbolt, with built in Apple TV software, SIRI for more complex actions than what Apple's simple remote can be practical for (text input), a FaceTime camera and WiFi for straightforward connectivity with iCloud and iOS devices.

I'm convinced Apple will hit this out of the ballpark with one minor exception: the price. Apple needs to price this to sell. Otherwise it won't. The days of premium priced Apple products for fanboys are over. Apple is pricing their products more aggressively than ever. They're still higher than the competition, but not enough to keep them out of the hands of most consumers. I don't think they can sell this for more than $1,500 and that's already very high for a 50" HDTV.

At that point, either your pricing it to be affordable or your stuffing in all of those features you requested. You can't really have both. There's no way to hide the price via subsidy with the iPhone, and TV makers are already operating on thin margins (something Apple doesn't do).
post #9 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

The sad thing is I think the studios would sooner kill a helpless baby than to let that happen. They don''t want to effectively cede control of their market to Apple. Keep in mind that if you actually had to PICK what you wanted to watch, more than half the cable channels would disappear, including the one obscure channel you might be interested in. The current system only works because they play round robin with the money they collect to prop up channels that wouldn't be able to support themselves on their own.

We all know the future is IPTV. The question is how do we get there when the cable companies have their powerful lobbying groups to protect themselves? They don't want to be seen as dumb pipes in which you'll have the choice of picking 6-7 providers of TV content (of which Apple could be one). They want to delay that day for as long as financially possible!

Wow that's a really good summary of what's probably stopping everything from progressing. As more and more people stop subscribing to cable TV though I think the studios will finally be forced to turn to Apple as their only hope. It happened with music and print already. TV and movies seem inevitable.
post #10 of 70
ahem..
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post #11 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

Geez, today must have been AppleTV day or something. Well, we'll see. Still think this will be an Apple box that attaches to 3rd-party 'Apple-blessed' TVs.

Yeah, and Apple should licence OS X.. lol
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post #12 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

You may be right, but that'd mean they'd have to include a camera in the bezel to Apple's specs in order to include Facetime--a must have function to make this TV truly stand out from the crowd.

Then that would be in Apple's specs for 'Made for Apple TV' makers. I could see where Apple might even provide certain parts to insure a consistent experience.
post #13 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

You may be right, but that'd mean they'd have to include a camera in the bezel to Apple's specs in order to include FaceTime.

iTV will not have FaceTime.
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post #14 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPedro View Post

I imagine it will have to have HDMI to gain industry acceptance but even that is not guaranteed.

iTV will have zero HDMI ports. Just as iPad has zero USB ports.
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post #15 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPedro View Post

He talks about controlling the entire user experience just like Mac, iPod, iPhone, and iPad. You can't control the ENTIRE user experience if you have to deal with other manufacturer's televisions.

I haven't read the book yet, so I didn't know that. But I also don't know that Apple has to make the entire TV to 'control the experience'. These are TVs, not computers. The critical 'control' features could be, again, insured by insisting on certain specs inside the TV, and of course Apple still makes the attached box.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iPedro View Post

I'm convinced Apple will hit this out of the ballpark with one minor exception: the price. Apple needs to price this to sell. Otherwise it won't. The days of premium priced Apple products for fanboys are over. Apple is pricing their products more aggressively than ever. They're still higher than the competition, but not enough to keep them out of the hands of most consumers. I don't think they can sell this for more than $1,500 and that's already very high for a 50" HDTV.

You just destroyed your own argument. Price is NOT a minor consideration these days, and Apple has been keenly competitive in its pricing. You are saying: "Well, this time they WON'T be price-competitive, and so they will make a great but very high-priced product that won't sell (not widely anyway).

Read your own argument. That's what you said.

The solution of course is this: Don't make the whole TV.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Yeah, and Apple should licence OS X.. lol

I never made that argument, or anything like it... lol
post #16 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by iPedro View Post

A simple plug in TV with a power cable, Thunderbolt, with built in Apple TV software, SIRI for more complex actions than what Apple's simple remote can be practical for (text input), a FaceTime camera....

I'll rewrite this for you:

A simple plug in TV with a power cable, optical audio, an ethernet port, a physical remote control with buttons, running a built-from-scratch TV-variant of iOS with something reminiscent of a grid of icons. TV shows, obviously. Movies, obviously. App Store, obviously.

Perhaps even some sort of iOS-style folder system so when you download a certain genre of app it goes into that folder - say a news app gets put in the news folder, a game gets put in a game folder etc. After that you've apps like Settings, with no ability to change how the screen looks. Well, perhaps a possible setting for brightness, but even that could be sensed ambiently. No camera, no Siri, no weird shit. iTV.

- - -

What's the single best feature of iTV?

A feature Apple won't push really hard, but one that every owner of an iTV will become very aware of after using it for about a week: One remote per living room.
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post #17 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

iTV will not have FaceTime.

Of course it will. It'll be a key feature, the final stage for FaceTime, the thing that will boost it finally.

With more than 100 million devices out there FaceTime capable, that will be a complete success.
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post #18 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvidal View Post

Of course it will. It'll be a key feature, the final stage for FaceTime.

I cannot prove to you that you are wrong, but you'll find out you are wrong.
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post #19 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

I never made that argument, or anything like it... lol

You just don't get it. Right over your head.
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post #20 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

Then that would be in Apple's specs for 'Made for Apple TV' makers. I could see where Apple might even provide certain parts to insure a consistent experience.

I disagree that they won't make their own TV (if they go into the market at all). It just doesn't make sense to me.

If Apple can make everything else besides the screen (and they already do almost with the current Apple TV), why wouldn't they make the screen as well if they can get a good price on components? (and of course they can)

To assume they will need to "keep the TV" and just connect their box to it, is to assume that the stuff that's already connected to this TV is part of the plan. I don't see that it is. It also just makes Apple one of the many boxes connected to a TV. They already have that in Apple TV and while it's popular it's hardly going to take over the market. They will aim for a one-stop solution that *replaces* all those other boxes instead.

An Apple branded TV wouldn't have many connectors, it wouldn't have external speakers, it wouldn't have cable. And once you take that stuff away, all that's left is the screen and the software.
post #21 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

You just don't get it. Right over your head.

Oh, I completely 'got it', what little there was to get. It was just so terribly tired and lame is all. Kinda sad really.
post #22 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

Oh, I completely 'got it', what little there was to get. It was just so terribly tired and lame is all. Kinda sad really.

Apple already makes the box you think they'll make. Look at what Steve said. He's very specific.
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post #23 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

If Apple can make everything else besides the screen (and they already do almost with the current Apple TV), why wouldn't they make the screen as well if they can get a good price on components?

1) Because in order to buy this thing, you have to dump your existing TV. This is not a market (like the iPod market, like the iPhone market, like the iPad market) where Apple's product defines a brand-new, wide open market. People already HAVE TVs. This thing would have to be so radical that people would feel as if they never had a worthwhile TV before it came.

You could say that about other Apple products: People never owned/used/cared about MP3 players until Apple came along. Same thing re tablets until Apple came along. Same thing about smartphones.

But people HAVE TVs. They have add-on boxes. They have TiVos. Apple may improve the experience but it's unlikely they'll define a product category here.

2) Because making the screen means now they have to get the thing into Sears, Best Buy, etc., and fight for space among all the other TVs. It's a bad strategy to do that, and it's also a bad strategy NOT to do it. That is, if they're making the entire TV.

But if they're making something that works with sets that are "Made for AppleTV", then they have TV manufacturers elbowing each other out of the way hoping that gives them an edge. These manufacturers already HAVE floor space and distribution channels.

Compare with this: For all Apple's success in wide-open, new markets it defines, its progress in gaining share among PC makers has only been gradual. That's because people HAVE PCs. It's not a new market Apple can define.

Same deal with TVs.
post #24 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I disagree that they won't make their own TV (if they go into the market at all). It just doesn't make sense to me.

If Apple can make everything else besides the screen (and they already do almost with the current Apple TV), why wouldn't they make the screen as well if they can get a good price on components? (and of course they can)

To assume they will need to "keep the TV" and just connect their box to it, is to assume that the stuff that's already connected to this TV is part of the plan. I don't see that it is. It also just makes Apple one of the many boxes connected to a TV. They already have that in Apple TV and while it's popular it's hardly going to take over the market. They will aim for a one-stop solution that *replaces* all those other boxes instead.

An Apple branded TV wouldn't have many connectors, it wouldn't have external speakers, it wouldn't have cable. And once you take that stuff away, all that's left is the screen and the software.

The only thing I disagree with in your post is the cable connection. I think that it would include it. Cable companies are already rolling out apps with subscriptions. Why wouldn't you get a cable plan with just a cable and no box and premium cable apps with a subscription fee?
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post #25 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

ahem..

Unless Siri is enabled through a connected device. Not intended for use across a room but with your iPhone, iPad or iPod if you so choose.
post #26 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Apple already makes the box you think they'll make. Look at what Steve said. He's very specific.

I could be wrong. But you're (and others here are) interpreting his words and deciding 'it must therefore be this'. I see (and have described) the problems with the approach of building/marketing an entire TV.

The biggest problem, which is worth reiterating, is this: Apple has done incredibly well in markets it more or less 'created' and defined. But it has done much less well with its computers. By which I mean, yes, the computers are selling quite well these days. But they do not dominate the market, even now. PCs do.

That's because Apple did not get (or I should say 'seize') the opportunity to get out in front and define the PC market. MicroSoft did, by cloning its products. Apple did not need to license the iPod or iPad because they were out front with the right product from the get go and were very aggressive. But with the iPhone, they came up against a very aggressive competitor in Google - which cloned its products - and Apple does NOT dominate in smartphones (in the sense that more Androids are sold).

Therefore, because Apple is hardly the first TV manufacturer, they do NOT have a wide-open field here. If they make a standalone TV, even a company at the height of its powers like Apple is going to have a difficult time defining this product category. History shows us this.

The solution is the 'Made for AppleTV' brand, with manufacturers making Apple-spec'd products designed to work with the AppleTV box. This is 'cloning' in a sense, and solves all kinds of problems Apple faces in getting this device accepted and into homes - where it will work with (and therefore sell) more iPhones and iPods and iPads. (And for Apple, that is where the real money is.)

Now, you can argue that Apple did just fine, as it turned out, in deciding NOT to clone its MacOS machines. True. But there's a bigger picture. There are two main computer operating systems in the world (three if you count Linux). Apple makes superior and fairly-priced PCs, so therefore it should sell about half the computers, no? But it clearly does not. Even with only one or two rival systems, it sells a very modest share of the world's computers.

Apple has always made a better machine. The VCR was also inferior to BetaMax. But there are factors of distribution, consumer education, habit, and mindshare that very often trump merely having a somewhat better product. Apple triumphed with iPods and iPads because they could define the entire product space AND make a superior product. There simply was nothing else.

But there are a zillion TVs out there, made by a boatload of manufacturers. For the headache of fighting for floor space at Sears, etc., and attempting to educate floor salesmen (something that did not work for Macs, thus Apple's retail stores were born) Apple might attain 10 percent of the TV market. If it really, really fights for it and spends a ton of money on ads. (Whereas the same effort applied to making and selling, say, more iPads would be hugely more lucrative.)

Or it can 'clone' and get its potential competitors on board, instead of fighting them, and work to establish a standard that way. It is a path of far, far less resistance.

So there you have it. You can go with what you think the implications of 'what Steve said' are, or you can look at the actual situation and Apple's actual track record, and try to understand how Apple might approach this particular problem.
post #27 of 70
I know the Fanbois think AAPL invents everything, but you do know that the Fall Xbox update will make the Xbox do all of these very same things? Steve Jobs wanted to make the Xbox without games, brilliant!
post #28 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

You may be right, but that'd mean they'd have to include a camera in the bezel to Apple's specs in order to include Facetime--a must have function to make this TV truly stand out from the crowd.

I am not sure about that.

The iPhone, Macbook or iMac are natural devices for FaceTime style video chatting, because you're the right distance from the camera. The TV? Not so much, IMO. Where would you sit? Close to the TV? Far away?
post #29 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Snitch View Post

1) Because in order to buy this thing, you have to dump your existing TV. This is not a market (like the iPod market, like the iPhone market, like the iPad market) where Apple's product defines a brand-new, wide open market. People already HAVE TVs. This thing would have to be so radical that people would feel as if they never had a worthwhile TV before it came.

You could say that about other Apple products: People never owned/used/cared about MP3 players until Apple came along. Same thing re tablets until Apple came along. Same thing about smartphones.

But people HAVE TVs. They have add-on boxes. They have TiVos. Apple may improve the experience but it's unlikely they'll define a product category here.

2) Because making the screen means now they have to get the thing into Sears, Best Buy, etc., and fight for space among all the other TVs. It's a bad strategy to do that, and it's also a bad strategy NOT to do it. That is, if they're making the entire TV.

But if they're making something that works with sets that are "Made for AppleTV", then they have TV manufacturers elbowing each other out of the way hoping that gives them an edge. These manufacturers already HAVE floor space and distribution channels.

Compare with this: For all Apple's success in wide-open, new markets it defines, its progress in gaining share among PC makers has only been gradual. That's because people HAVE PCs. It's not a new market Apple can define.

Same deal with TVs.

People had cell phones, including smartphones, before the iPhone came along.
People had laptops before the Macbook Air.

Both products are doing well.

And it's not just Apple that's capable of disrupting the incumbent. People had flat screen TVs before Vizio came along. Vizio is now the top US seller.
post #30 of 70
That fallacy being made in this thread is one where Apple is supposed to take over a large portion of the market.

That's shortsighted"

Apple controls the largest media store online that this world knows. So like the iPod they control and profit off of both ends where competitors could only profit off of one.

Apple making a HDTV makes sense if you look at a TV as just an oversized iPad much like and iPad was an oversized iPod.

It's really more about building the ecosystem than wondering what Vizo or Samsung is doing. Even with computers today there's little interest from Cupertino about chasing the low end market.

With HDTV there will always be the affluent consumers that want to buy better than what their friends bought at Costco or Best Buy. That market is indeed lucrative and likely the focus.
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post #31 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

iTV will not have FaceTime.

What makes you think that?
post #32 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

People had cell phones, including smartphones, before the iPhone came along.

There were MP3 players before the iPod, too, but they were niche products and virtually unknown when Apple entered the market, thereby giving them the opportunity to define it. Smartphones were at about that same place when Apple came along. That was the point I made, and you have not refuted it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stelligent View Post

People had laptops before the Macbook Air.

As I said, Apple is indeed selling computers. Never said they weren't. Never said Apple was the first with a laptop, either, so I have no idea what point you're trying to make.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Apple making a HDTV makes sense if you look at a TV as just an oversized iPad much like and iPad was an oversized iPod.

You plan on holding this TV in your hand and carrying it around, do you? Going to operate it by touching the screen? I'll assume not. Bang goes that poorly-reasoned comparison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

That fallacy being made in this thread is one where Apple is supposed to take over a large portion of the market.

'THE' fallacy being made here, actually, is that Apple can make an AppleTV set and DEFINE the market. Apple has not actually 'taken over' any EXISTING markets under Jobs. It has created and defined NEW markets, but taken nothing over.

It is possible that, as you say, Apple merely wants to make a high-end (i.e., expensive) product for the relative few, as Tiffany's does or Mercedes does. It's possible, but it flies in the face of the simple observation that Apple has, under Jobs (and presumably for the immediate after-Jobs period) made price-sensitive high-performance products for the MAJORITY. As they used to say, 'Computers for the rest of us'.

So sure, the company could be making a 180 degree turnabout here, but where is your actual evidence of this?
post #33 of 70
The guy is responsible for iTunes? That does not excite me about an Apple TV. Will I have to accept Apples Terms & Conditions every time I turn it on?
post #34 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizzpooper View Post

I know the Fanbois think AAPL invents everything, but you do know that the Fall Xbox update will make the Xbox do all of these very same things? Steve Jobs wanted to make the Xbox without games, brilliant!

Except the Apple TV will block trolls.
post #35 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

The guy is responsible for iTunes? That does not excite me about an Apple TV. Will I have to accept Apples Terms & Conditions every time I turn it on?

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post #36 of 70
Quote:
You plan on holding this TV in your hand and carrying it around, do you? Going to operate it by touching the screen? I'll assume not. Bang goes that poorly-reasoned comparison.

Not if you're looking at it from the perspective that a HDTV is just another display hooked up to electronics. Much like an iPod Touch or iPad.

Also remember that the touch screen need not be the surface of the display but can also be on a device that lays on the table flat. Magic Trackpad anyone.

I've yet to read a valid argument why Apple , owner of the largest media store on the planet, should not make HDTV.

Doesn't take a rocket scientist to put two and two together.


1. iTunes
2. Apple TV
3. Apple rumored agreement with Rovi
4. 1080p content coming
5. iCloud

Hard to look past the elephant in the room here.
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post #37 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Except the Apple TV will block trolls.

Presumably you wouldn't buy another $1000 device just to comment on the interwebs. But seriously, the Xbox already does all these things. And it sells like crazy. And does many more things. What's the market for an AAPL TV?
post #38 of 70
I'm sure Samsung will try to rush out their Google TV before this thing hits stores... it it's even true...
post #39 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizzpooper View Post

I know the Fanbois think AAPL invents everything, but you do know that the Fall Xbox update will make the Xbox do all of these very same things? Steve Jobs wanted to make the Xbox without games, brilliant!

Are you an idiot savant? How else could you know this since nobody else knows for sure what Apple's plans are?
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."
Reply
post #40 of 70
if apple ever do a Apple TV Set it will have everything build into the tv including Siri,menus,facetime and itunes,gaming and more...it will be plug and play.
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