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NYT: Apple expected to release Siri-powered television by 2013

post #1 of 134
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Apple has reportedly been at work on a full-fledged high-definition television set for years, but the company's recent launch of Siri for the iPhone 4S is believed to be one of the final puzzle pieces necessary for Apple to launch its own TV.

Executives at Apple knew as far back as 2007 that the company planned to eventually build its own television set, sources told Nick Bilton at The New York Times. Jobs had reportedly been pushing engineers at Apple for years to develop a new interface for living room TVs.

Apple's internal goal is said to have been simplifying the way users interact with a TV, and to replace the "awkward and confusing remote control." While early concepts included using a wireless keyboard, iPhone or iPad as a remote, the best solution said to have been discovered was voice commands through Siri.

Jobs hinted at the new user interface in his authorized biography released this week. In it, Jobs told author Walter Isaacson that he had "finally cracked" the secret to building an easy-to-use television set, and said it would have "the simplest user interface you could imagine."

Bilton first heard of a possible Apple television set over a year ago, but sources at the company reportedly told him that nothing was being actively built at the time. However, one source said that a full-fledged Apple TV set was a "guaranteed product," as Jobs apparently felt the TV hardware business "is totally broken."

The article states that Apple has "quite a bit of work" left to do on the project, as the company does not have as much expertise in building thin television sets as it does iPhones, iPods and MacBooks.

"The company also needs to wait until the cost of large displays falls," it reads. "Although some 42-inch LCD televisions from mainstream consumer electronics companies can cost as little as $500, the Apple television would include computer electronics and other technology that may make the price uncompetitive."

He sees Apple announcing a product by late 2012, with a potential final release to consumers by 2013. The piece concludes by asserting that a television set is definitely "coming."



Talk of an Apple television set has picked up considerably since the release of Jobs's biography. On Tuesday, analyst Shaw Wu with Sterne Agee said that while Jobs was "very excited" about the prospect of a true Apple TV, the project remains held up by content licensing deals that the company feels are necessary to release a competitive product.

In 2009, Apple was said to have pitched a $30-per-month iTunes subscription plan to content providers, but the company was unable to ink any deals with content providers. The company instead decided to rent individual TV show episodes for 99 cents, but that model was abandoned after it failed to catch on with consumers and content providers were reluctant to jump on board.

On Monday, Bloomberg reported that Jeff Robin, an Apple vice president who helped to build both iTunes and the iPod, is spearheading the company's efforts to produce a connected TV. Such a device is expected to have integrated search functionality that will allow users to seamlessly find their content from a number of locations, including iTunes, Netflix or a cable subscription.
post #2 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple has reportedly been at work on a full-fledged high-definition television set for years

Well ya don'y say
post #3 of 134
I NEED an Apple TV!
post #4 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple has reportedly been at work on a full-fledged high-definition television set for years, but the company's recent launch of Siri for the iPhone 4S is believed to be one of the final puzzle pieces necessary for Apple to launch its own TV.

On Monday, Bloomberg reported that Jeff Robin, an Apple vice president who helped to build both iTunes and the iPod, is spearheading the company's efforts to produce a connected TV. Such a device is expected to have integrated search functionality that will allow users to seamlessly find their content from a number of locations, including iTunes, Netflix or a cable subscription.


Apple has never been any good at search.

I predict that this will be a regular TV with Siri functionality built-in via a search app. And it will have the ability to buy stuff from Apple.

I hope that it will be more.
post #5 of 134
I've tried talking to my Xbox with Kinect, and it's inability to recognise pretty much anything makes it 100% useless. I've also played around with Siri on my wife's iPhone 4S and the results are.... to be frank, garbage.

Perhaps it's because we're English and not American, but it's accuracy was only around 50%. it produced amusing results, but it's really limited to toy value for now. The thought of trying to control a TV solely using voice commands is not in the least bit appealing. I think I'll stick with my TiVo.
post #6 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I've tried talking to my Xbox with Kinect, and it's inability to recognise pretty much anything makes it 100% useless. I've also played around with Siri on my wife's iPhone 4S and the results are.... to be frank, garbage.

Perhaps it's because we're English and not American, but it's accuracy was only around 50%. it produced amusing results, but it's really limited to toy value for now. The thought of trying to control a TV solely using voice commands is not in the least bit appealing. I think I'll stick with my TiVo.

This is the big reason Apple stayed with Nuance for siri instead of trying to roll their own or go with someone else, IMO. Understanding what you are saying is critical and no one does it better than Nuance. The other side, understanding what you mean, is perhaps something Apple added to the process. I could imagine a similar collaboration for a TV/Home Entertainment product.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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post #7 of 134
My optic nerves are in danger of severing from the amount of times I've had to roll my eyes at this nonsense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ConradJoe View Post

Apple has never been any good at search.

Except for Spotlight, the best OS search ever made and Mail's new search, the best mail search ever made.
post #8 of 134
me: "television, find"

my kid yelling: "gogglenAdfnd!"

This will never work.
post #9 of 134
I'm kind of excited at the prospect, but it has to be competitively priced. My 61" Samsung gives me beautiful 1080p pictures, and until it dies, I'm not replacing it with anything. Even an Apple TV.
post #10 of 134
Considering Xbox is essentially going to be doing this by Christmas the end of next year is a bit late.
post #11 of 134
I'm having "Fahrenheit 451" flashbacks.
post #12 of 134
So, here's a question why would I possibly want this?

I consider my TV to be nothing other than a large monitor. I get inputs from a cable box, PS3 and an Apple TV. I can add new inputs, or remove old ones.

So why would I want to buy a new TV when all the inputs are the same? I seriously doubt Apple can make a display that's "better enough" to make me replace my existing one.

For that matter, what it is the Apple TV doesn't have now? Live channels, and *all* content. That's it.

Those two issues have nothing to do with hardware and everything to do with licensing. If Apple signed deals with every major player to stream to you, it could be in my Apple TV the next day with a software update.

So why would I buy a new TV to get *that*? Well, I wouldn't.

Simply put, I don't believe this rumour for a second.
post #13 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I've tried talking to my Xbox with Kinect, and it's inability to recognise pretty much anything makes it 100% useless. I've also played around with Siri on my wife's iPhone 4S and the results are.... to be frank, garbage.

Perhaps it's because we're English and not American, but it's accuracy was only around 50%. it produced amusing results, but it's really limited to toy value for now. The thought of trying to control a TV solely using voice commands is not in the least bit appealing. I think I'll stick with my TiVo.

Did you switch the language over to UK?
Hard-Core.
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Hard-Core.
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post #14 of 134
This could be interesting.

"Siri, tell me when House is on"
"Here are the next times for House..."
"DVR House at 4 PM."
"Recording set."
"Watch House season 3 episode 2."
"You don't have a copy of that, shall I purchase from iTunes?"
"Yes"
"Downloading. Ready to watch."

All you need is handheld microphone, and some filtration that blocks out background noise.
post #15 of 134
Siri does not handle background noises very well, so I would be very surprised to see a Siri-powered television. I can see it now -- Siri responding to televlsion shows and commercials.

TV commercial: "Try the new banana scented OxiClean! Buy two and get one free within the next ten minutes!"
Siri: "I don't understand 'oxygen clean'. Should I search for this in a web browser?"
post #16 of 134
I would like to see Apple produce a TV just to see what they come out with. I wouldn't buy one though. I already have an plasma HDTV which has excellent picture quality.
post #17 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

me: "television, find…"

my kid yelling: "gogglenAdfnd!"

This will never work.

Right- you start yelling at the TV once the loud commercials come on, get frustrated, then throw it out the window!
post #18 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

I would like to see Apple produce a TV just to see what they come out with. I wouldn't buy one though. I already have an plasma HDTV which has excellent picture quality.

Samsung?
post #19 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by enjourni View Post

All you need is handheld microphone, and some filtration that blocks out background noise.

What if you have home theater system and you have the sound up watching Transformers? Might be tough to filter out the noise. Maybe go downstairs where it is more quiet.
post #20 of 134
I think the potential goes far beyond simply talking to your TV. This could be the impetus for much better home integration with the TV becoming a type of hub. Tie in some X10 type tech that work with the Siri interface and iOS could change a lot of how we run our homes.

"Keep the house at 68 degrees until 6 am. Then take it to 70."

"Lock all doors"

In addition I see the content delivery changing. Siri is a feature, it doesn't reshape how we get our content. For that Apple will need to get deals with content providers. That's the hang up.
~Tokolosh
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post #21 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by iKol View Post

Samsung?

Panasonic.
post #22 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So, here's a question why would I possibly want this?

I consider my TV to be nothing other than a large monitor. I get inputs from a cable box, PS3 and an Apple TV. I can add new inputs, or remove old ones.

So why would I want to buy a new TV when all the inputs are the same? I seriously doubt Apple can make a display that's "better enough" to make me replace my existing one.

For that matter, what it is the Apple TV doesn't have now? Live channels, and *all* content. That's it.

Those two issues have nothing to do with hardware and everything to do with licensing. If Apple signed deals with every major player to stream to you, it could be in my Apple TV the next day with a software update.

So why would I buy a new TV to get *that*? Well, I wouldn't.

Simply put, I don't believe this rumour for a second.

In case you didn't notice the Apple TV you have does not support voice recognition.
post #23 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

I've tried talking to my Xbox with Kinect, and it's inability to recognise pretty much anything makes it 100% useless. I've also played around with Siri on my wife's iPhone 4S and the results are.... to be frank, garbage.

Perhaps it's because we're English and not American, but it's accuracy was only around 50%. it produced amusing results, but it's really limited to toy value for now. The thought of trying to control a TV solely using voice commands is not in the least bit appealing. I think I'll stick with my TiVo.

That is why Siri is still in beta!
post #24 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Negafox View Post

Siri does not handle background noises very well, so I would be very surprised to see a Siri-powered television. I can see it now -- Siri responding to televlsion shows and commercials.

TV commercial: "Try the new banana scented Oxyclean! Buy two and get one free within the next ten minutes!"
Siri: "I don't understand 'oxygen clean'. Should I search for this in a web browser?"


Well, hopefully they would improve Siri by the time the new Apple TV came out. Also it might have something to do with the 4S microphone, possibly a better microphone would fix it.

Your TV commercial example is easily fixed by making the handheld microphone push-to-talk.
post #25 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by enjourni View Post

Well, hopefully they would improve Siri by the time the new Apple TV came out. Also it might have something to do with the 4S microphone, possibly a better microphone would fix it.

Your TV commercial example is easily fixed by making the handheld microphone push-to-talk.

I'd agree with this approach, too. The primary mic is on the hand remote, when you activate it it might reduce the background volume too, in the process.
post #26 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by enjourni View Post

All you need is handheld microphone, and some filtration that blocks out background noise.

Rendering it completely pointless, as anything you're holding would be better served as a remote.
post #27 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by enjourni View Post

This could be interesting.

"Siri, tell me when House is on"
"Here are the next times for House..."
"DVR House at 4 PM."
"Recording set."
"Watch House season 3 episode 2."
"You don't have a copy of that, shall I purchase from iTunes?"
"Yes"
"Downloading. Ready to watch."

All you need is handheld microphone, and some filtration that blocks out background noise.

"Siri, tell me when House is on"

"When the House is on what? On fire? Is there a switch to turn the house on and off?"

"Never mind, Siri, I'll use the remote."

"I like the way you touch the remote."

"Siri, this has to stop. I'm calling Apple."

"Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do. I'm half crazy, all for the love of you. It won't be a stylish marriage. I can't afford a carriage. But you'll look sweet upon the seat of a bicycle built for two "
Hmmmmmm...
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Hmmmmmm...
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post #28 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

Simply put, I don't believe this rumour for a second.

I believe the rumor, that Apple is working on their own TV. But I have doubts if it will be successful. I even have doubts that such a device would see the light of day. Steve would push it out the door against any doubts by other Apple employees. But would any voices of concern now have a greater say in the release of such a product now that Steve is gone?

The bigger question in my mind, is if the Apple HDTV doesn't pan out, do that have another "next great thing" in the pipeline?
post #29 of 134
To all the people who have come up with reasons why this will not work. Do you really think you are smarter than Steve Jobs was, and he never considered all of these technical issues?

Really!
post #30 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

Rendering it completely pointless, as anything you're holding would be better served as a remote.

Agreed. For general searching, voice could be useful so you don't have to type in your search conditions. But for all other functions, I think I'd be able to navigate using a remote much more efficiently. If I want to browse what's currently playing on my cable, I can push a single button on the remote and see the grid much faster than saying, "Siri, display the current cable lineup" and waiting for my request to be translated and understood.

If Apple can get the providers to agree to content deals that would let me get rid of cable, that would be something. But I don't see them agreeing to that without also giving other's the same (or better) deals (think Amazon, Netflix, etc). And those other's would likely have a much better proposition than buying a new, high-margin, Apple-branded TV.
post #31 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post

My optic nerves are in danger of severing from the amount of times I've had to roll my eyes at this nonsense.

Send your address and $9.95 for shipping and handling to receive your FREE WHITE CANE! If you respond within the next 15 minutes I'll DOUBLE THE OFFER. Just pay additional shipping and handling.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

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post #32 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by kent909 View Post

To all the people who have come up with reasons why this will not work. Do you really think you are smarter than Steve Jobs was, and he never considered all of these technical issues?

Really!

To the people who think this product actually exists and that we know absolutely anything about any feature set beyond what random analysts are spewing just to be paid ludicrous amounts of money:

REALLY?! Really really? How can you POSSIBLY defend a product that doesn't exist? Until someone on stage cranks up the Billy Mays and tells a Siri-enabled Apple TV (no HDTV) to turn the volume down and it actually works, it's up in the air.

And until you can explain to me why I'm supposed to hold a microphone to use a hands-free means of interaction with my devices when a normal touchscreen remote would do perfectly well OR BETTER than that, I'll continue to have doubts that Siri for televisions is the right way to go.
post #33 of 134
In my opinion, Apple's ability to successfully bring such a product to market will be a true test of their ability to execute post-SJ...
post #34 of 134
Consistency is the last refuge for the unimaginative.
post #35 of 134
Interesting if true as Apple never leaked a new product and such details this early before. Why give Google, Microsoft and Samsung that much lead time to copy?
From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
Long on AAPL so biased
"Google doesn't sell you anything, they just sell you!"
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post #36 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maury Markowitz View Post

So, here's a question why would I possibly want this?

I consider my TV to be nothing other than a large monitor. I get inputs from a cable box, PS3 and an Apple TV. I can add new inputs, or remove old ones.

So why would I want to buy a new TV when all the inputs are the same? I seriously doubt Apple can make a display that's "better enough" to make me replace my existing one.

For that matter, what it is the Apple TV doesn't have now? Live channels, and *all* content. That's it.

Those two issues have nothing to do with hardware and everything to do with licensing. If Apple signed deals with every major player to stream to you, it could be in my Apple TV the next day with a software update.

So why would I buy a new TV to get *that*? Well, I wouldn't.

Simply put, I don't believe this rumor for a second.

Sooner or later you will have to buy a new TV. When you do, a Siri driven Apple TV will have evolved to be the best of the Smart TV category, just like the iPhone is now the leader of Smartphone category. I bet you'll buy an Apple TV.

And so will a whole lot of people over the lifespan of the Smart TV category.

Apple is going to sell billions of these.
post #37 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by pt123 View Post

Panasonic.

I approve this message. If it happened to be inside the next plasma I was gonna buy anyway I would be happy to give it a try.
post #38 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by enjourni View Post

This could be interesting.

"Siri, tell me when House is on"
"Here are the next times for House..."
"DVR House at 4 PM."
"Recording set."
"Watch House season 3 episode 2."
"You don't have a copy of that, shall I purchase from iTunes?"
"Yes"
"Downloading. Ready to watch."

All you need is handheld microphone, and some filtration that blocks out background noise.

No microhone, Siri will learn to filter out home background noise.

Great software makes great hardware.
post #39 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokolosh View Post

I think the potential goes far beyond simply talking to your TV. This could be the impetus for much better home integration with the TV becoming a type of hub. Tie in some X10 type tech that work with the Siri interface and iOS could change a lot of how we run our homes.

Yes, you get it.

"Keep the house at 68 degrees until 6 am. Then take it to 70."

"Lock all doors"

In addition I see the content delivery changing. Siri is a feature, it doesn't reshape how we get our content. For that Apple will need to get deals with content providers. That's the hang up.

iTunes will still reign, content not a problem.
post #40 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Beige View Post

iTunes will still reign, content not a problem.

King of Beige doesn't know content is King?
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